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Hi Guys,

I am preparing for SHTF by first thinking about just what I would do if the power went out. I have a propane BBQ that would work to boil water and cook soup, but I would like to have a simple, easy, and long term solution to heat food. Can anyone suggest a stove solution that would allow me to cook off of? I don't have a ton of space (no garage...), so I am thinking more along the lines of a camp stove type solution.

Thank you very much for your suggestion,
 

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Coleman makes a great line of cookstoves,thay use propane or coleman feul,some of the newer modles also use unleaded gasoline but i would avoud using that as a feul(jmo)but you shouldnt use it in a confined area without adequate ventilation.We have used one on several occasions in the kitchen but we always had a kitchen window open when it was in use.The propain modles are the most hassle free but it uses fuel faster that the other modles,the gas modle will cook several meals(3 a day for about 3 days )without having to refill the tank.The cost of propain and the cost of the american camper brand of fuil are about the same but you get more use out of the liquid fuel......jmho......ms,hillbilly
 

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Thanks for the help. I am for sure looking for the best house hold solution. I have been able to find a lot of info on pocket stoves and the like, but basically I am after a cooking solution that would best substitute for the house hold stove.

Maybe my propane Weber Genesis with an extra tank is not a bad answer after all.
 

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Now coleman also makes a gridle that operates off of propain,we are thinking about getting one for our pontoon boat,could fry burgers or boil water on it i supose....just another option.....
 

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Plants don't run!
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Bow drill. Learn it and do it as a hobby, learn to do it in good weather, rain, snow, wind, or what ever weather you don't want to do it in, that is where you want to practice. Make it fun for yourself, a challenge. Matches come in second. Then Lighters.

Be able to start a fire with only one match. Like I've said, make it a game. That's how we learn. If you can't start it fully with one match, reset! "Okay, I can make it with THIS one match" you'll learn. Don't get down on yourself and hate yourself for not being able. Practice makes perfect. Try it now, in all sorts of weather!

"If it ain't raining we ain't training!" try to make your fire in rain, and snow, and wind, and what ever condition you can get. After you can do this with a match, move on up to trying it with bow drill!

Being able to do these things will allow you to cook where ever, deserts are not my area of expertise.
 

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The propane stove is great ,if its got a lid there's your oven ;if not get a campstove tin box oven that goes on top of camp gas stove ,found in any major retailer's catalog.
 

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Servo quod Servo
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A nice hot bonnet (sorry dont know the US word) of a car/vehicle.
That would be a cars hood......

Also look into the denatured alcohol stoves, I have one and really like it. Then there is the smaller fuel tabs, trioxane or some such.

I have a cord of wood in the back of the house, and 20 acres of hickory...so I am thinking I will use wood...
 

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Purdy Bear's on the right track. Liquid fuel-fed heating units are not going to be as sustainable as solar or wood-fed units.

Solar ovens....easy to make (some even made with a basic cardboard box layout and alum foil)

Rocket stove...easy concept (some made with large tin cans and piping)

Just google these and you'll find reference articles and videos.
 

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Long term I'd look for the most efficient grill/smoker you can afford. If things end up long term, it'll come down to wood. Getting a grill/smoker combo will allow you the option to jerk meat easier than with a regular BBQ grill. Get a stainless steel one if able.
 

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I use two main methods. First off, I have an Alpaca kerosene cooker. Kerosene stores well, and holds more heat per gallon than propane. It can be treated with preservative (Pri-D is best for kerosene) and re-treated to stay useable for a very long time. Not sure what an Alpaca costs now, but it was about $90 when I bought it.

Secondly, I use a small, fold up camp wood stove. Wood is available pretty much everywhere, even here in the desert. And after the SHTF, you'll have plenty of it to scavenge out of abandoned and damaged buildings and old trees. This stove also does double duty as heat for the home. It's too small to heat a home in the colder northern climates, but is about perfect for our mild winters here where you don't really even need heat in the winter. I lived 17 years in an unheated home here and didn't miss it one bit.

Rather than go to all the trouble to install the pipe permanently, I made a plywood panel the size of a window. The pipe passes through it. In a crisis, I remove the window, install the panel, and have a heat and cooking source. Total cost, about $250.

I'd suggest a small, inexpensive propane stove and a few tanks of propane just to help get you through short term disasters and for convenience in longer ones. You just can't count on propane for long term because of how much you'd have to store. That's where wood stoves really come in handy.
 

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There are all sorts of proplane, white gas, butane, alcohol and wood burning stoves available to buy or make yourself. Just depends on what specifically you want out of the stove, not only cooking power, but fuel use/storage/expense and portability.
For example, propane takes a lot of space to store, but never rots and can be stored indefinately, but is heavy to carry around in quantity, and doesn't work as well as white gas in cold or at altitude. White gas cooks hotter and is better at altitude and in cold than propane, but rots in storage and is dangerous to store, is also heavy and bulky and expensive. Wood stores well, is available nearly anywhere (break up furniture if necessary) and since it's readily available, not much need to transport it, and it's relatively cheap, but it is hard to burn when wet and it does rot. Stoves that use these fuels will have related issues, depending on their fuel.
If you're looking for something to use at home or car camping, a Coleman or Primus propane stove is hard to beat. For extremely light and efficient stove use in cold, at altitude or backpacking, a Coleman Peak 1 Multi-Fuel would be my pick, or perhaps an MSR stove of some sort. A homemade hobo wood-burning stove is light, cheap and fun to make and use, but hard to cook gourmet dinners on one.
 

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Hi Guys,
have a propane BBQ that would work to boil water and cook soup, but I would like to have a simple, easy, and long term solution to heat food. Can anyone suggest a stove solution that would allow me to cook off of?
Forgive my asking the obvious:
Does your current BBQ have a side burner? That's effectively a camp stove, though less portable?
 

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Coleman makes a great line of cookstoves,thay use propane or coleman feul,some of the newer modles also use unleaded gasoline but i would avoud using that as a feul(jmo)but you shouldnt use it in a confined area without adequate ventilation.
Coleman's current lineup includes propane, coleman fuel, unleaded (and kerosene, Jet A, and inverted liquified gas fuel bottles in some of the skeleton-style exotic expedition stoves).
IMO no liquid fuel stoves should be run indoors.

The cost of propain and the cost of the american camper brand of fuil are about the same but you get more use out of the liquid fuel......jmho......ms,hillbilly
According to Coleman propane stoves and lanterns cost about 5x as much to run as coleman fuel models. At current local gas prices propane costs about 12x as much as unleaded (dual/multifuel models only). Of course, at some point you'd have to figure in the replacement or repair costs associated with unleaded-fouled generators.
 

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