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Founder
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Honda makes a dual generator set-up. This means the two generators can be connected to almost double the output.

Each generator can put out 2000 watts. Connected together, they put out somewhere around 3500 watts. I think some wattage is lost in the cascade, so its less the 2,000 + 2,000.

If one generator goes down, break the cascade, decide what you "really" need to power and keep going.

These generators go to my parents RV.

The silver box on the front of one of the generators is where you plug one generator into the other one.
 

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Voyager
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The Honda generators have the option on 1000 w 2000w and the 3000w gens that I know of so they are the same sine wave.

I like kev's idea on if one goes down rather than one large gen set it's all down.
 

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Savage intellectual
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1,866 Posts
I wonder how they co-ordinate the two different sine waves into one?
Probably through a phase lock loop set-up.

Wikipedia "phase lock loop" said:
A phase-locked loop or phase lock loop (PLL) is a control system that generates a signal that has a fixed relation to the phase of a "reference" signal. A phase-locked loop circuit responds to both the frequency and the phase of the input signals, automatically raising or lowering the frequency of a controlled oscillator until it is matched to the reference in both frequency and phase. A phase-locked loop is an example of a control system using negative feedback.

Phase-locked loops are widely used in radio, telecommunications, computers and other electronic applications. They may generate stable frequencies, recover a signal from a noisy communication channel, or distribute clock timing pulses in digital logic designs such as microprocessors. Since a single integrated circuit can provide a complete phase-locked-loop building block, the technique is widely used in modern electronic devices, with output frequencies from a fraction of a cycle per second up to many gigahertz.
 

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Savage intellectual
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http://www.gen-tran.com/eshop/10Browse.asp?Category=PPK

They are going to be digitally controlled to lock the sin-wave. If not, then the stronger of the two will "force" the weaker genset into phase. This isn't a problem for the alternator-end, but the prime-mover is going to turn into sharp bits of hot metal flying through the air for you and your friends. Fun!
I disagree. Almost all small generators are DC output and are inverted by electronics to 120V/60Hz AC. Since the inversion is electronic, then the PLL can set the phase and frequency to any benchmark determined by the "lead" output signal.

Edit: Aha, it says so right here in the page you referenced:

Our GenTran parallel power kits offer an affordable, convenient power solution to use two inverter generators in parallel for operating appliances or lights while camping or during a power outage at home.

These generators incorporate parallel jacks for parallel connection as well as a microchip to synchronize the sine waves of both generators for one continuous output.
So they are DC generators on an inverter circuit. The coupling is most probably a PLL circuit that synchronizes the two outputs to a single-phase 120V/60Hz AC sine-wave output, at the same phase.
 

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trois pour cent
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I would just like to comment that I have almost the same setup, Kev. My box attachment is configured slightly different. I'm very pleased with the setup. I have used it for remote camping with a fifth wheel and for power at my house. Often only use one at a time. Cable them together for bigger needs. They have an efficiency setting which works well. They are extremely quiet (big plus) and they are so small they can be stored in my truck tool box.
Only downside is it would be a nice to have a bigger tank. There are plans available online if you care to adapt a 3 or 6 gallon tank which they can both draw from or you can purchase already built.
These things are so quiet it's amazing. A big plus if you don't want your generator heard from miles away.

This is a post from another forum that I found interesting.
This is the Honda EU2000i gasoline powered generator:

http://www.mayberrys.com/honda/generator/models/images/eu2000i.gif

I am sure many of you are familiar with this generator and know it is an outstanding power source. It delivers 2000 watts and has all sorts of features that overall make it a great (and quiet) little generator. A full tank (about a gallon) with a moderate load will run for 10 hours or so. It weighs 46 pounds. The EU2000i costs about $900.

If you need more power, there is a device that allows you to combine two EU2000i generators to provide 4000 watts:

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/100174_lg.jpg

Using the "twins" approach you could also use one for parts if one broke down on you.

In the event of a sudden power outage, assuming you have a 5 gallon can of gas in the garage and 10 gallons of gas in your vehicle, you could run this generator for 5 hours per day for approximately 30 days.

If you had a couple of deep cycle batteries such as the Optima yellow top in your vehicles (has plenty of cranking amps and lasts for many years--I have them in my vehicles), a 1500 watt inverter and a battery charger you would be able to charge these each day during the generator run time and have a decent amount of power for the hours of the day you aren't running the generator.

http://www.offroaders.com/directory/products/images/optima-yellow-top.jpg

This simple setup could provide you with up to a month of intermittent electricity in the event of a sudden power outage. This is clearly not a long term solution to electricity needs, but for a relatively minor investment you would have several weeks of electricity when others might have none.

I have one and just start it and let it run for a while each time I mow the grass. I service it when I service my lawnmower. I have had mine for several years and have used it in many different situations (though thankfully a long-term power outage was not one of them).
 

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I drink your milkshake!
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I disagree. Almost all small generators are DC output and are inverted by electronics to 120V/60Hz AC. Since the inversion is electronic, then the PLL can set the phase and frequency to any benchmark determined by the "lead" output signal.

Edit: Aha, it says so right here in the page you referenced:



So they are DC generators on an inverter circuit. The coupling is most probably a PLL circuit that synchronizes the two outputs to a single-phase 120V/60Hz AC sine-wave output, at the same phase.

Thanks for your comments and clarifications. Perhaps I could have worded it clearer, but you'll note I stated above in my comment that UNLESS THEY ARE DIGITALLY CONTROLLED....
 

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Savage intellectual
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Thanks for your comments and clarifications. Perhaps I could have worded it clearer, but you'll note I stated above in my comment that UNLESS THEY ARE DIGITALLY CONTROLLED....
I was more concerned with the implication in your post that somehow the engine would fly apart.

This isn't a problem for the alternator-end, but the prime-mover is going to turn into sharp bits of hot metal flying through the air for you and your friends. Fun!
There's no concern is all I'm pointing out. Since the output of the generators is DC before inversion, then the device just acts as an outboard inverter with a higher rating, and uses the DC outs from the gensets.

No problem though.
 

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trois pour cent
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Just wanted to add a little something on the Honda EU 2000. As I posted before, I have two and run them singly or sometimes in parallel.
My power has been off for about 36 hours now due to storms. Last night, I ran one generator only to keep the fridge/freezer cold and to provide me with a nice big fan for sleeping comfort.
The generator has a 1.1 gallon fuel tank. I filled it up just before 10 pm last night. It ran dry at 08:30 this morning. That's pretty good economy for 10.5 hours of use.
 

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Good Bye
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Just wanted to add a little something on the Honda EU 2000. As I posted before, I have two and run them singly or sometimes in parallel.
My power has been off for about 36 hours now due to storms. Last night, I ran one generator only to keep the fridge/freezer cold and to provide me with a nice big fan for sleeping comfort.
The generator has a 1.1 gallon fuel tank. I filled it up just before 10 pm last night. It ran dry at 08:30 this morning. That's pretty good economy for 10.5 hours of use.
wow... that is impressive!
 

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Transplant
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This may be slightly off topic - but several years back there were some local storms and the power was out for a bit in a lot of areas. A guy I now work with bought a generator, only to have the power kick back on after a week (right after he started unpacking it). However, he said that soon after he contacted FEMA about a reimbursement thing and they sent a rep out a few days later. He ended up being reimbursed for the cost of the generator and the cost of repair to his gutters.

I'm not sure what to make of it, but this is a guy who really isn't a BS'er... anyone hear anything about this?
 

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Founder
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm not sure what to make of it, but this is a guy who really isn't a BS'er... anyone hear anything about this?
Yes, it is standard for FEMA to reimburse people for buying a chainsaw and genny after a bad storm.

You should really start a new thread when you have an off topic question.
 

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Da BADDEST MoFo!!
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I bought a 5200 watt and a 1500watt quite run genny. The quite run is nice and is used to power light when bow fishing and camping in areas where they only allow so many deciple levels or you cant have em.
 

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I am whatever I say I am
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Does anyone have any experience with the EU3000i generator? I am thinking of getting it rather than the 2000, but my only concern is its weight: it weighs about 115 lbs, and I am worried I will not be able to carry it far. Would it be easier to deal with two 2000's hooked up together rather than a single 3000?
 

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trois pour cent
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I find the two of them easier to handle. Each weighs about 55 lbs with the tanks filled. Easy to move around. I love being able to run one or two depending on the need. They usually are stored in the tool box on the bed of my truck. Easy to load, unload from there.
 
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