Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Colt .45 m1991 a1 commander model that I bought in about 1993. Recently, a deputy has been coaching me on my shooting skills. He recommended I practice drills at home, dry firing 10 times for every live round I shoot at the range.

So, my question is, does dry firing handguns damage them?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
I was trained to never dry fire any firearm. It wears out the firing mechanism faster than if you're using real ammo or a snap cap, or so I was taught.

HippieSurvivalist
 

·
I'm keeping my eye on you
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
You can dry fire the 1911 without doing any harm to the handgun. And I agree with the deputy assisting you. I taught firearms to law enforcement and citizen groups for over 20 years and that is the best way to perfect your trigger pull. Kev posted a thread a few days ago regarding the Weaver Stance (which I don't recommend). In the first video, the instructor gives some very good tips on firing the 1911, to include grip and trigger pull. Here is the link.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=31072&highlight=weaver+stance

(Don't pay too much attention to Kev's shooting with all that trick photogrophy and all.) :)
 

·
Rifleman
Joined
·
1,600 Posts
I have been a competitive rifle and pistol shooter for several years. Part of my practice is dry fire drills. I have dry fired and practiced magazine changes thousands of times and have never hurt anything. The only gun I know of that you will damage is a rim-fire. On some of those the firing pin will hit the barrel and can damage the firing pin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,785 Posts
I have dry fired my no dash 66 several thousand times in the process of learning the art of draw and shoot. It still functions fine and I can still hit the x at 50 yards no problem.

Good quality gun, the dry fire wont hurt it, if you have an RG than the above advise is useless..............
 

·
Domestic Terrorist
Joined
·
243 Posts
I was trained to never dry fire any firearm. It wears out the firing mechanism faster than if you're using real ammo or a snap cap, or so I was taught.

HippieSurvivalist
Same here, thats how I was brought up. It freaked me out in Basic training when they had us doing dry fire drills with the M-16A2. Of course a lot of what I grew up with about weapons had to go by the wayside. One was Never Aim a weapon at something/someone you don't intend to shoot and a weapon is always loaded. They had us getting good sight pictures on each other while we did washer/dime drills (place dime across front sight post then dry fire, if someone jerked the trigger it fell).
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top