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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering storing drinking water in one of those
big blue 55 gallon food grade plastic containers.

I can find them used for around $10 and new ones for around $60.

Provided that I clean the heck out of the used ones, is there any
reason I shouldn't store drinking water in them?

Also, if anyone has better ideas for water storage, I am open to
suggestions.

Thanks,
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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They're one of the most common water storage containers, and sold as such by most of the survival supplies companies. $10 is a good deal. It seems like no matter what container you look into, they run about a buck a gallon and to me, that's ridiculous.

I struggled for years trying to find the right solution. Then when I was looking for irrigation parts, I stumbled across the perfect setup. Those IBC totes. You know, the square plastic tank inside the metal cage that they use to transport liquids. Those things are available cheap everywhere. I paid $20 each for mine, but they seem to run a little higher everywhere else. They hold 275 gallons.

You need to make sure they held food grade liquids though. Some of them are used to ship lubricants and chemicals. Mine originally held soy oil. Take a look on craigslist, in your local classified listings, and check food factories. There's a sandwich factory here that makes sandwiches for convenience stores. They always have them for sale. Also, most cities have materials resellers that resell shipping and packing material. They always have them also, since they're rarely reused.

They can be stacked 3 high when full. They're about 4 feet by 4 feet and two high will generally fit underneath a standard 8 foot ceiling. So if you can spare 4 feet in the corner of the garage, you can pack 550 gallons of water in it, for just a few bucks and some work cleaning it out.
 

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Sorry About Your Feelings
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Kev made a good video about Portable... Water... Storage... :D:


------------------------
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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This is dependent upon your specific circumstances, of course, but I've wrestled with the water storage thing myself. What I've concluded is that I'm better off having great water filters than in having a ton of water stored.

Right now I have about 9 cases of bottled water (we rotate through it slowly). I also have a water heater full of 'prox 30 gallons of drinkable water.

But I also have purchased some of these:

http://www.monolithic.com/stories/a-practical-life-sustaining-water-filter

My rationale is that it's easier to make water from roof runoff, stream water, and so on, than it is to store a whole bunch. The filter has the added value of being portable as well as what I believe to be a very valuable barter item.

Now, if you don't have decent rainfall you can harvest from you roof, or other nearby sources, then you have a different circumstance than do I. But I want the ability to "make more" rather than to rely completely on my own storage.
 
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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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This is dependent upon your specific circumstances, of course, but I've wrestled with the water storage thing myself. What I've concluded is that I'm better off having great water filters than in having a ton of water stored.

Right now I have about 9 cases of bottled water (we rotate through it slowly). I also have a water heater full of 'prox 30 gallons of drinkable water.

But I also have purchased some of these:

http://www.monolithic.com/stories/a-practical-life-sustaining-water-filter

My rationale is that it's easier to make water from roof runoff, stream water, and so on, than it is to store a whole bunch. The filter has the added value of being portable as well as what I believe to be a very valuable barter item.

Now, if you don't have decent rainfall you can harvest from you roof, or other nearby sources, then you have a different circumstance than do I. But I want the ability to "make more" rather than to rely completely on my own storage.
It's pretty hard to find much water here. But either way, a combination of storage and treatment makes sense. You can't store a lifetime supply, but there are also times when it might be safer to drink from storage than try to go outside to get more water. Unfortunately I'm in the desert, so it takes a trip to the river to refill. The fewer trips, the better. I have a 325 gallon tank I can take to the river as well as a bunch of 5 gallon ones.
 

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Cautious Optimist
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This is dependent upon your specific circumstances, of course, but I've wrestled with the water storage thing myself. What I've concluded is that I'm better off having great water filters than in having a ton of water stored.

Right now I have about 9 cases of bottled water (we rotate through it slowly). I also have a water heater full of 'prox 30 gallons of drinkable water.

But I also have purchased some of these:

http://www.monolithic.com/stories/a-practical-life-sustaining-water-filter

My rationale is that it's easier to make water from roof runoff, stream water, and so on, than it is to store a whole bunch. The filter has the added value of being portable as well as what I believe to be a very valuable barter item.

Now, if you don't have decent rainfall you can harvest from you roof, or other nearby sources, then you have a different circumstance than do I. But I want the ability to "make more" rather than to rely completely on my own storage.
That filter system is awesome. Ordering a couple now!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well, I just picked up 3 of these from China Mart:



That should be enough for 72 hrs.

I'll probably just fill them with tap and add a few drops of bleach.
That should last me a few years right?

As for filtration, I bought one of those Just Water Ceramic Drip Filters:


I'm thinking it might be a good idea to still get the 55 gal barrel though.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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How long are you trying to prepare for? Water storage is the most common sticking point for a lot of us. I know it took me years to finally work out a system.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'd like to plan for as long as possible.
I'm not short on space either.

Right now I've got one 50 gallon rain collector,
three 7.5 gallon containers, a ceramic drip filter,
and about 20 Katadyn Micropur water purification
tablets.

I'd like to add a 55 gallon drum and perhaps some
more water purification tablets.

I've also got the water heater.
 

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They're one of the most common water storage containers, and sold as such by most of the survival supplies companies. $10 is a good deal. It seems like no matter what container you look into, they run about a buck a gallon and to me, that's ridiculous.

I struggled for years trying to find the right solution. Then when I was looking for irrigation parts, I stumbled across the perfect setup. Those IBC totes. You know, the square plastic tank inside the metal cage that they use to transport liquids. Those things are available cheap everywhere. I paid $20 each for mine, but they seem to run a little higher everywhere else. They hold 275 gallons.

You need to make sure they held food grade liquids though. Some of them are used to ship lubricants and chemicals. Mine originally held soy oil. Take a look on craigslist, in your local classified listings, and check food factories. There's a sandwich factory here that makes sandwiches for convenience stores. They always have them for sale. Also, most cities have materials resellers that resell shipping and packing material. They always have them also, since they're rarely reused.

They can be stacked 3 high when full. They're about 4 feet by 4 feet and two high will generally fit underneath a standard 8 foot ceiling. So if you can spare 4 feet in the corner of the garage, you can pack 550 gallons of water in it, for just a few bucks and some work cleaning it out.
I found a local, about 70 miles from the house, company that sells open and closed top barrels. Which is it that most use for water storage? The closed top are $20, the open top are $35 and they also have the IBC for $90. All are advertised as food grade. Probably others closer but that was the first I found.
 

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We have quite a few options for water storage. One of these options, our boxed water kits, are on sale this month. The boxes are heavy duty and are stackable up to 3 high. They have metallized five-gallon water storage bags with pour spouts. On a side note, the storage boxes can be converted into portable toilets as well if needed. These portable kits can also be loaded in your vehicle if necessary.

100-Gallon Boxed Water Kit - On sale for $114.99



25-Gallon Boxed Water Kit - On sale for $29.99

 

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I buy a few gallons of bottled water every time I go to the store--cheap and it adds up quickly and I have a least a week's worth of bottled water alone-probably two if we use it sparingly--but we want to smell good :) I have been looking into getting a rainwater system (not from the roof) and a charcoal filteration system as it seems to be the cheapest way to go and still have a lot of water for bathing and using the bottled water for consumption. Making sure you have potable water is essential so a good filtration system (or bleach or chlorine) must be a part of your water storage plans. Also, if up north, you must watch out for freezing temperatures as they can make your water ice, not a problem for me though.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I found a local, about 70 miles from the house, company that sells open and closed top barrels. Which is it that most use for water storage? The closed top are $20, the open top are $35 and they also have the IBC for $90. All are advertised as food grade. Probably others closer but that was the first I found.
Either are good for water storage. The open top units are good for rain gathering. I'd say figure cost per gallon and footprint. The reason I went with IBCs is because they were not only so much cheaper per gallon of storage, but because they let me store more water per square foot. 550 gallons only takes a 4 foot square.

Can you share your system? I'm in SoCal ,dry here also. Thanks
I haven't gotten into rainfall gathering yet. But my current system is storage in irrigation tanks and IBC totes. I had originally tried Aquatanks. Those are bladder storage systems. I found that they took up a lot of space and were prone to leak at the seams. They also don't have a very long life before the plastic errodes.

I learned to keep an eye on the farming communities in the area. They are always replacing or removing irrigation tanks. I got a 325 gallon one for free, just for hauling it off. But they regularly sell them used for a fraction of the cost of new. Then I found IBC totes. As I've gone along, I've found more and more sources of them, so it's wise to research sources then compare prices.

This is about the cheapest way to store large amounts of water. It seems like all the other systems run about a dollar a gallon, which to me, is ridiculous.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Question - Anyone know how much bleach per gallon I should be adding to my water?
I would say don't even start down the path to bleach. I did that for years. It doesn't have a long shelf life and it loses potency. Take a look at the threads here about using calcium hypochlorite, AKA pool shock. It lasts for decades and you can make up your own bleach whenever you need it for disinfecting around the house and for water treatment. Better to just start there to begin with.
 

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never satisfied

I was perplexed at what to do about water at first. I live in the Mid-Atlantic region (Delaware).
I started out buying gallon jugs from the supermarket. Word is that they leak after some time. I didn't wait to find out.
I bought a blue food-grade 55 gallon barrel that I stored in my basement and filled it with tap water.
Next was two 50 gallon rain-catch barrels, one is out and one is stored in the garage (I found that one is enough for my use in "normal" times).
A few months ago I had a few extra bucks so I bought the Berkey Light system. It is a great addition.
The combination of a close (within 100 yards) stream, rain-catch, and Berkey should get me through most 'stay-at-home' situations. I am never satisfied, though, and am always on the lookout for improvements.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I've decided to go with pool shock to purify my water
if need be.

Anything wrong with buying the premixed liquid solution or should
I go with the powder? The reason I ask is that most of my research
suggests creating the mixture yourself before adding it to the water.

I think I'd be ok here but just figured it wouldn't hurt to see what
everyone else thinks. Is there a certain percentage of calcium hydrochloride
I should be looking for, etc?
 
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