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Discussion Starter #1
I came across this article just a few minutes ago. I hadn't seen anyone else post this here.

http://kplu.org/post/home-canning-hobby-leads-near-fatal-medical-emergency

Home canning is regaining popularity as part of the local food movement. If done right, families can enjoy home grown fruits, vegetables and even meat all through the winter. But if done wrong, it can be devastating, if not deadly.
And there is so much misinformation out there. A few years ago I was looking to can pumpkin. I found a youtube video with some nut job who just microwaved the pumpkin, scooped it out and put it in jars, and that, according to her, is how you can pumpkin! (For those who've never canned pumpkin before, they say you have to can it as cubes and not as puree, otherwise it is too dense and the center will not heat up correctly and it would be unsafe to use).

Even just reading the comments to the article, people cannot agree about boiling the food once you open it, and many people get terms reversed.

Also, when using a new canning recipe, double check it! This poor guy here lost 28 quarts of meat due to a mistake in the canning book.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/blogs/...aled-and-canning-time-for-johnsonville-brats/

This blog is also where I got the link to the first article.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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There are some things you can just do however your creative mind thinks it up. Canning isn't one of them. Canning food is a safe procedure IF you follow a few basic guidelines. Don't let fear keep you from canning but don't throw the safe canning instructions out the window either.

It appeared the person in the article was almost making an effort to ignore safe procedures. There are, on average, only 23 cases of foodborne botulism in the U.S. each year. He managed to avoid following directions enough to be one of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There are some things you can just do however your creative mind thinks it up. Canning isn't one of them. Canning food is a safe procedure IF you follow a few basic guidelines. Don't let fear keep you from canning but don't throw the safe canning instructions out the window either.

It appeared the person in the article was almost making an effort to ignore safe procedures. There are, on average, only 23 cases of foodborne botulism in the U.S. each year. He managed to avoid following directions enough to be one of them.
Yep, canning is very safe as long as you follow the directions. One thing I've learned to do is to ALWAYS read the instructions before canning, even if I just canned the same thing the day before. That's saved my hide a number of times in regards to correct processing times.
 

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There are still people on this board, right now, that argue that a pressure canner is not needed at all, and his family's been water-bath canning meat since Grandma's time. I really, really tried to stay calm in my response!
 

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There are still people on this board, right now, that argue that a pressure canner is not needed at all, and his family's been water-bath canning meat since Grandma's time. I really, really tried to stay calm in my response!
I read a blog once about canning pumpkin puree and they said that they water bath it for 3 hours and they've been doing it for years and that's how gramma did it and they are fine.

And yes, perhaps 9 times out of 10, you will be fine. But there's always that chance...

I read somewhere that perhaps more people died of food poisoning long ago than we really realize... because they may not have realized the cause. Case in point, even in that article they didn't initially suspect botulism.
 

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I ain't doing that!!
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You only have to see someone sick from botulism once to become a true believer. Not only am I obsessively compulsive about the what/how of canning, I refuse to eat anything canned by someone else. Botulism is NOT to be trifled with ...
 

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You only have to see someone sick from botulism once to become a true believer. Not only am I obsessively compulsive about the what/how of canning, I refuse to eat anything canned by someone else. Botulism is NOT to be trifled with ...
which is why i say canning anything but pickles is retarded.

dehydrate, its way better/easier/safer/lighter/more compact
 

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Shade Tree Gynecologist
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I have been canning stuff with meat in it for a few years now. I followed the rules and my 2 years old veg beef soup still taste great. Even my sweet and sour pork is good. It's great for a quick meal.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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which is why i say canning anything but pickles is retarded.

dehydrate, its way better/easier/safer/lighter/more compact
Canning is a very safe, reliable, tasty way to preserve food. You just have to follow the rules.

I suppose if following instructions is an issue, it is probably a superior idea for you personally to avoid canning, but that is certainly not the normal situation.
 

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I've been pressure canning since I was a teenager, some 30 years now. I am extremely careful about cleanliness and following instructions. I don't want to promote botulism in my canned foods, but the main reason I follow directions each and every time I can is because I cannot afford to waste the food I am canning--meat is often home grown or the product of hunting or fishing. Low acid vegetables are again often home grown, such as carrots and potatoes. Why in the world would I risk ruining mulitple pints and quarts of meat, vegetables, soups, stews, & etc.? I don't have that kind of money to throw away. I also value my time. The time it took to raise the animal to butchering size plus the time and effort to butcher and process it; the time and money spent growing the carrots, potatoes, beans, & etc. and then to harvest and process those for canning. AND my time actually spent canning. AND the gas to run the stove. AND the water used in all the jar washing, food prepping, lid simmering, & etc.

In terms of OVERALL costs, canning isn't always the cheapest thing to do.

Why in the world would I risk wasting food, gas, water, and time by taking shortcuts? Now THAT would be foolish, wouldn't it?
 

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Canning is a very safe, reliable, tasty way to preserve food. You just have to follow the rules.

I suppose if following instructions is an issue, it is probably a superior idea for you personally to avoid canning, but that is certainly not the normal situation.
sure, but knowing that botulism is odorless, tasteless
could be present even if the lid is not bulged
and you wont know a thing until your paralyzed and dieing

who can ever enjoy eating canned food?

i dont.
 

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Fence sitting heathen
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The misinformation out there definitely had me worried at times. I just started canning and did a batch of chicken. Looks like it came out just fine.

What I'd really be interested in though is some good recipes that are basically meals in a can rather than individual items to make a meal.

I want to do both, but are there any good trustworthy resources out there that give recipes for one stop meals in a jar?
 

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It's important to follow a recipe from a reliable source. Youtube videos are not considered reliable. Universities do the scientific research as do companies like Ball. Here are a few sources.

National Center for Home Food Preservation
http://nchfp.uga.edu/

Western Center for Food Preservation.
University of California At Davis
http://wcfs.ucdavis.edu/

Washington State University
http://foodsafety.wsu.edu/

Colorado State university Cooperative Extension
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/safefood/index.html

Utah State University Cooperative Extension
http://extension.usu.edu/foodstorage/

Oregon State University Cooperative Extension
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/fch/food-preservation

Penn State University Cooperative Extension
http://extension.psu.edu/food/preservation

University of Idaho Cooprative Extension
http://www.extension.uidaho.edu/minidoka/canningtips.htm

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/forsale.php?pub_autokey=421

What can happen if you don't do it right
http://www.kplu.org/post/home-canning-hobby-leads-near-fatal-medical-emergency

Follow the proper procedure and recipes and it's a great way to preserve ypur harvest for the winter, and bad times.
 

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If SHTF and I say if, don't bother stopping by our homestead/bol, you'll be starving.

I wonder how many "fresh Veggies" you buy at the local grocery and box stores?
Every year there are numerous cases of food born illnesses caused by cantaloupe, spinach, sprouts and the oh so convenient salad in a bag. Way more case of food born illness than from home processed foods I would bet.

I'll take my chances with my own food over the Big Ag for $ industry any day.

As a little test, if you cook with garlic, look at the label and see where it was imported from, 90% chance it comes from china, you know the country that gave us poisoned dog food, shrimp/catfish raised in poop water :thumb:









sure, but knowing that botulism is odorless, tasteless
could be present even if the lid is not bulged
and you wont know a thing until your paralyzed and dieing

who can ever enjoy eating canned food?

i dont.
 

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Actias Luna
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When I first started canning, I watched a nice video about canning butter. It was entirely wrong. We used one jar before I understood how dangerous her way is. Now I may watch a video about canning but I still follow the Ball Blue Book.

When it comes to my kids, safe canning is the only option.

Something about meals in jars doesn't sit well with me yet though. As of now I still preserve only single meats, fruits, jams, or vegetables with nothing added other than seasonings.

I'm either a purist or weirdo. :D: Probably the latter.
 

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Thorough heating the canned food above 80C (176F) degrees for 5 mins. neutralizes the A botulism toxin and 15 mins. Neutralizes the B toxin. (Source: Food Microbiology, Frazier and Westoff third edition, page 426) This is what has saved a many southern country folk. We tend to over cook everything. Since I have started canning myself, and compared notes with my mother-in-law, it's a wonder we are alive. Turns out she's been frying country sausage putting it in a can and slapping a lid on it. That's right no processing what so ever. Obviously, she thinks the purpose of canning is to seal the lid. The lid seals with just the heat of the meat and jar so she sees no need in pressure canning it. I've found so many mistakes in what she does and there's no correcting or explaining it to her. She's 75yrs old and don't understand much of anything scientifically. The answer is; I've done like this for years and nobody's died.
I've said all this to say this. Following your buddy's recipe, who followed someone else's recipe leads to stuff like above. Unless you are a microbiologist or food scientist use the recipes found in the Ball canning books or in Sgtbooker44's list.
 

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sure, but knowing that botulism is odorless, tasteless
could be present even if the lid is not bulged
and you wont know a thing until your paralyzed and dieing

who can ever enjoy eating canned food?

i dont.
Also knowing that simmering for a few minutes destroys the botulism toxin. Proper safe canning procedures nearly eliminate that risk, but simply simmering the canned food after opening removes it completely.
 

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Also knowing that simmering for a few minutes destroys the botulism toxin. Proper safe canning procedures nearly eliminate that risk, but simply simmering the canned food after opening removes it completely.
yes i am aware of this, and i certainly would not turn my nose up at home canned food if hungry

post SHTF/in hard times i'd be the guy that would gladly take the bulged can that nobody wants cuz most dont know you can destroy the BOT toxin, heck most dont know anything about BOT or canning or anything else.

but right now i think dehydrating kicks canning's azz all day long.

we take "meals in a jar" camping, just add water, cook on the campfire and your eating delicious chili or lasagna at camp.

seal up ready made meals in mylar bags for your BOB or GHB

canning your cooking out all the nutrients so if you use the food and dump the sauce/water your getting less nutrition out of your food.
 
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