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Hokie
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I've never seen an expiration date on raw spaghetti, so I'm wondering A) if anyone knows whether it goes bad and B) if it is a viable option for food stocking in bulk?
 

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The packages have a "Best By..." date 6-18 months out, similar to rice. Now, since "Best By.." is not "Will spoil immediately after...", it should last quite a while under the right conditions.

Keep it dry and cool, rotate your stock, it should be fine!

Edit: The first thing it will do is get stale, which can be covered up with sauce. Be sure to stock up with something to put on your plain spaghetti noodles. (I'm leery of canned tomato-based pasta sauces, since the tomato is acidic and could cause problems in a metal can. Glass would be better, IMO.)

As for actually getting moldy and rancid, I've never heard of that, but everything goes bad eventually. Sorry I can't be more help there.
 

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This is one of the things we got from the LDS Pantry (Canned with oxygen absorber) and to my understanding that is supposed to be good for a couple of decades. But you will have to Mylar bag it with an oxygen absorber or something similar. We have done this with other noodles and elbow macaroni .
 

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This is one of the things we got from the LDS Pantry (Canned with oxygen absorber) and to my understanding that is supposed to be good for a couple of decades. But you will have to Mylar bag it with an oxygen absorber or something similar. We have done this with other noodles and elbow macaroni .

if you stack it tite .... 30+ pounds of spaghetti per 5 gallon bucket .....
 

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Born to prep
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The biggest problem is bugs. I lost two boxes of lasagna noodles because of moths. The best way to store pasta short of putting it in Mylar bag it with oxygen absorbers is to store the bags in popcorn tins. Boxes to can tape the openings shut and dip the boxes in wax. I have noticed that when pasta gets older it takes on a yellow cast, gets brittler and takes longer to cook. It sill tasted like pasta.

My mom is an Italian chef with 25 year experience she says dry pasta does not go bad if you can keep the bug out of it.
 

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That "Best By.." date that I quoted (6-18) months is based on packaging that is a plain, non-sealed cardboard box. Given correct packaging, the possibility is for a VERY long time.

Pasta (and rice) is a big part of my prep-stock, tied with Rice.
 

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Libertarian
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We just put the boxes of pasta as is from Wallyworld in large plastic containers also from Wallyworld. No mylar, no 02 absorbers, no problemo!
 

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That's "Ma'am" to you
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We routinely eat pasta that's been sitting on the self in nothing but whatever it came home from the store in for at least a year or two, and who knows how long it sits on the shelf before you buy it. As long as it's dry it should be fine.
 

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What about fresh pasta? I cannot stand boxed pasta. If there a way to store fresh pasta for a long period of time?

Of course, worse case, I could eat boxed..but I would rather not.
 

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My oldest dried pasta (stored in mylar with 02 absorbers) is 8 years old. It is still perfect with no stale or papery taste at all.

Fresh pasta won't even last until Dec. 21 when the world ends. :zombie:zombie:zombie

That box pasta be goooood if ya hongry!!!
 

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Recent research has shown that white wheat pasta has the same lifespan as the wheat berries. Stored with O2 absorbers in a sealed contained, in a temperate environment, the expected lifespan is 25-30 years. Ensure there is no egg in your pasta if you plan to keep it more than 5 years.

That said, it is estimated that 30-40% of the population is wheat intolerant. If you are among that group, your stored wheat will be of no use when SHTF. Wheat intolerance typically rears its head during periods of intense stress, and it doesn't go away afterwards. It is an autoimmune disorder, so even minuscule amounts of wheat will cause your immune system to attack your intestines. The effects are damaging, physically draining, and emotionally tiring.

You can easily determine if you are predisposed to a gluten/wheat intolerance. Have a blood test done. If you're an O Type, there's a good chance intolerance will develop if your wheat intake is moderate or higher during a period of sustained and intense stress. Other blood types are much less likely to be affected.
 

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The biggest problem is bugs. I lost two boxes of lasagna noodles because of moths. The best way to store pasta short of putting it in Mylar bag it with oxygen absorbers is to store the bags in popcorn tins. Boxes to can tape the openings shut and dip the boxes in wax. I have noticed that when pasta gets older it takes on a yellow cast, gets brittler and takes longer to cook. It sill tasted like pasta.

My mom is an Italian chef with 25 year experience she says dry pasta does not go bad if you can keep the bug out of it.
First I truly believe that putting ALL grains in the freezer overnight kills the larvae that causes your bugs and moths. Also for the kitchen pantry I put Bay Leaves on the shelves and replenish them about every 6 months. Just one on each small shelf should do it. If shelf is larger use more.
 

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This is one of the things we got from the LDS Pantry (Canned with oxygen absorber) and to my understanding that is supposed to be good for a couple of decades. But you will have to Mylar bag it with an oxygen absorber or something similar. We have done this with other noodles and elbow macaroni .
if you stack it tite .... 30+ pounds of spaghetti per 5 gallon bucket .....
This is great! I have been wondering about this for a few weeks, just haven't researched it yet. Now I have another product to store, and something to try my first canning on. Now just to find out if I can store tomatoes with a pressure canner.
 

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Angry ol' coot
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What about fresh pasta? I cannot stand boxed pasta. If there a way to store fresh pasta for a long period of time?

Of course, worse case, I could eat boxed..but I would rather not.
Store some wheatberries (have a grain mill), powdered eggs and water...and you can have fresh pasta whenever you desire it.

And it will blow away the 'fresh pasta' you buy in the stores...taste wise and nutritionally.
 

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I have eaten 10 year old pasta that was fine that was in original, un-punctured (probably nitrogen purged) plastic packaging.

I have eaten pasta 12 months old, that was in an opened package, that was as stale as old boots, but although it didnt taste the best there was certainly no ill effects.

I have never had pasta go "bad" in an inedible way on me (or become bug infested, for me) but thats not to say it cant happen.
 

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This is great! I have been wondering about this for a few weeks, just haven't researched it yet. Now I have another product to store, and something to try my first canning on. Now just to find out if I can store tomatoes with a pressure canner.

before you start LTS food packing of pasta .... lots of previous postings covering the subject .... there's some special considerations ...
 

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That's "Ma'am" to you
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This is great! I have been wondering about this for a few weeks, just haven't researched it yet. Now I have another product to store, and something to try my first canning on. Now just to find out if I can store tomatoes with a pressure canner.
You can either pressure can or water bath can tomatoes.
 
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