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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just harvested quite a few idaho potatoes, grown from potato seeds I made from potatoes I bought from Kroger.

The potato plants grew fine in my raised beds and I got a lot of decent sized, nice shaped potatoes. The only problem is that the skin was completely different from the smooth potatoes the cuttings came from (rough skin). I have never had potatoes grow with skin like this. So, I am not sure they are safe to eat.

Please take a look at the image and let me know what you think:
Hand Plant Gesture Finger Thumb
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Bobcat! Thanks for the feedback. Funny thing is, there is not images of any potatoes like this online.

Again, thanks. I guess they are okay.
 

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It looks most like 'elephant hide' (see here: https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/catalog/files/project/pdf/em8948.pdf )
Nobody really knows what causes it. My guess is that the clues are the words 'potatoes I bought from Kroger' and 'raised beds'.

You don't know what the potatoes you bought were treated with; could have been a sprout suppressant which delayed growth once they were in the ground, for example. This could lead to uneven skin set, if they grow at all. I planted some shop-bought Jersey Royals (International Kidney) this year and they just sat in the soil waiting for the skin treatments to wash off. As far as I know they're still waiting. Seed potatoes grown for that purpose will not have been treated with anything.

The soil in your raised beds is almost certainly very high in organic matter. It probably also depends on you to keep it well watered. Any variations in your watering pattern could affect the skin set.

It's not practically important, because you can just peel it off, for home use. This is true for all potato skin defects. The only really bad one is late blight, but once it's in the tuber the whole thing will stink so you don't want to eat it anyway.
 

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Some spuds get something called scab when they are grown in alkaline soil. What you have could be a form of that, doesn't look quite the same but there are lots of varieties of potatoes and lots of different types of soil. Scab is ugly but doesn't effect edibility,
My scab ended when my soil changed from alkaline to slightly acidic.
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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When the pH goes above 7ish I would get rougher skins (still good) though those would head towards the skinned food plans. I would also get more non uniform shapes. I do containers and I get what I get, I do miss my fireplace ash... and when it comes planting it is what it is

For those that shop for most of their produce in the off seasons and such will have to expect to see more nonstandard shapes and lower qualities. I dont expect as much produce will tossed and hang out on shelves longer due to the higher prices.

There was a store I used to go that got 2nds and at times had really good deals and good content. Large winter squash for a dollar each, or lemons/apples 10 for a dollar. Sometimes I would leave with several bags and others just a handfull.

 

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Food Ingredient Plant Fruit Staple food

Mine looked just like yours. Here one is two weeks later. I cure mine in newspaper. (probably the only reason we still get a newspaper.)
I also did mine from volunteers the sprouted from an old bag of potatoes from Aldi.

The thing is, they look pretty much the same as the ones that we got from the store. I suspect that they are a hybrid Russet and the 'children' take after one of the hybrid strains.

Regardless, they are quite tasty and harden well. We will keep them in the newspaper in the root cellar and see how they do. We got a nice crop this year.
BTW, also done in a raised bed using a variation of Mel's Mix.

Not bad for 'free' potatoes.

PS, we used all the little guys without hardening. Great in a Curry or stew. We stored them in a paper lunch bag until use. You want to keep your potatoes out of the light as much as possible, even the ones you get from the store. Light exposure causing them to green.
 

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I had kind of an odd one this year, too, it was more like "goosebumps" all over some of the potatoes. Not all of them. Seemed quite different than the scab I see sometimes. Didn't seem to be a problem, just odd. I couldn't tell from your picture whether it was just something you see or whether it was a texture thing happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I had kind of an odd one this year, too, it was more like "goosebumps" all over some of the potatoes. Not all of them. Seemed quite different than the scab I see sometimes. Didn't seem to be a problem, just odd. I couldn't tell from your picture whether it was just something you see or whether it was a texture thing happening.
It is a rough texture. Kinda like snake skin.
 

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@MikeMic, I find it interesting that you've had success using potatoes bought in a grocery store as seed potatoes. It is my understanding that potatoes sold in grocery stores are treated with a substance that inhibits formation of sprouts, and of course you want sprouts on seed potatoes.
 

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@MikeMic, I find it interesting that you've had success using potatoes bought in a grocery store as seed potatoes. It is my understanding that potatoes sold in grocery stores are treated with a substance that inhibits formation of sprouts, and of course you want sprouts on seed potatoes.
More often than not we get standard store bought potatoes that sprout after a while. It seems to happen all of the varieties we buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
@MikeMic, I find it interesting that you've had success using potatoes bought in a grocery store as seed potatoes. It is my understanding that potatoes sold in grocery stores are treated with a substance that inhibits formation of sprouts, and of course you want sprouts on seed potatoes.
Yes. They were already sprouting eyes in the bag so, I removed them and once they developed, I cut them up and planted them. They all grew fine.
 

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I had a ready to cook box of fingerlings sprout when it go pushed back an missed in the pantry. It was planted but out of season and froze early with no production. I dont remember the brand as the product info film was removed for the pic.


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I've been growing potatoes successfully for 4 years using seed potato's from my winter crop. I alternate between two beds built up using compost made from grass cuttings dug into a horrible base soil of clay, sand, and a basic bagged peat compost.
This year for the first time the spuds have thick brown spots on them, in both beds.
Which I've been peeling off and the spuds taste fine.
However a few have "classic scab".

I was going to put it down to being too hot and dry, but by reading your posts, I now know what's going on.

So, no more potatoes of a couple of years.
With a PH in the high 6-7 Range, it also looks like I've got a lot of conditioning to do.
Still it does leave the two beds for other veg.
Apart from my tomato crop which is always potted.

Thanks for your comments
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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At first ... I thought you were talking about this potato:
Forehead Nose Chin Eyebrow Microphone


But seriously ... different soil can have a lot to do with how various fruits, plants, and veggies end up looking. Acid soil vs alkaline. Hi nitrogen vs low. High content of one type of mineral vs other minerals. Moist vs dry soil. Etc.
 
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