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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No this is not about telling time nor about rushing preps against a looming disaster. It is instead a observation about the time it takes to do things in a self-sufficient living arrangement.

Take for instance I was reading up on cold smoking ham that done right would preserve it practically forever. This came from a old cookbook I have. Just the salting of the meat took days and than 10 days of keeping a smoke fire going to get it preserved properly. Many of the other methods of food producing, gathering, preservation were also time consuming. You look around at the work previous generations had to do to wrest a living and if you are not simply amazed at the effort, you fail to understand the time spent on it.

In the US today I think most people expect stuff to happen immediately. That many are not prepared in a rather vital area, shear patience. I see where people start to lose tempers simply because they get slowed down on the freeway to the point they want to whip out a gun and kill someone. 2 minutes of delay is intolerable. I wonder what that personality trait will do when facing sitting all day waiting, hoping for a deer to pass by. Or having to spend all day getting rocks out of a field.

At any rate it just struck me that one thing to prepare for is time.
 

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That's a very good point, and true. Look at old family pictures, especially of people who lived in pioneer times or those who raised families in the Depression. Notice how old they look. The women especially, at 40 or 45 look like today's 70 year olds.
 

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Also consider that the wood requried to smoke that same ham would take days to prep instead of hours (hand cutting versus chainsaw)...... anything now with a machine that take minutes or hours would take twice as long should somethign significant happen and we not have the equipment available now to use.....
 

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The weak and instantly gratified part of the population will HAVE to learn to put their big girl panties on and be a man. Patience will be learned one way or the other in a shtf scenario. Patience in hunting, building with scrap lumber, finding water, etc. will humble the "boys" that honk on the highway over those two minutes you mentioned. You will learn to be patient or you will die. It's that simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good point Ackbob. Hello jjm from Tennessee. Thanks Buffy. They might have looked older Monique, but I bet they could put up preserves all day while raising 10 kids.
 

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Good post.

I think that this is why people tended to specialize in their jobs, and to work together as a community.

For one man to hunt a deer might take a day or two with no guarantee of success. that's time you didn't get to invest in smoking a ham.

Getting a couple of dozen neighbors together for a drive hunt takes an afternoon, allows the experienced hunters to demonstrate/train the kids in hunting, shooting, cleaning, and butchering, (virtually) guarantees you at least a quarter of a deer, and lets you get home in time to reload the smoker.

It's not just patience we're going to have to relearn, it's learning to depend - really depend - on our neighbors. Even the ones we don't get along with.
 

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Previous generations had a hard life. That is why we had advances in making things easier. Hopefully we won't have to learn exactly how hard it was for them. We should still be able to do things easier since the infrastructure and resources will still be around. But in much limited supplies.

For the impatient, instant gratification crowd they will get a cold and rude slap upside the head by the reality of the situation. It will be a very hard learning curve for most people whether they are resource prepared or not.
 

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I am sooooo lucky. We have been prepping for quite a few years, but when a car died, we decided I would stay home full time. I grew up living like it was 100 years ago, so I know what it takes to survive, I am just a little out of practice. Now I have time to practice! My husband is much younger, he is in the instant gratification generation. But he IS learning. You should have seen the look on his face the first time he saw me grind coffee and chicory then set a coffee pot on the stove "WTF is that thing?" Recently I wanted a new small pressure cooker for meals only and at the same time the mircowave fried. We could have gotten cheap versions of both, but he made the decesion to spend all the money on the pressure cooker. It may not be quite as fast as the microwave, but as he has learned it tastes a whole heck of a lot better. Oh yeah - and now he takes my coffee in a thermos to work so he dosen't have to drink that "crap" out of the office pot.
 

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Prepared Firebird
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That's a very good point, and true. Look at old family pictures, especially of people who lived in pioneer times or those who raised families in the Depression. Notice how old they look. The women especially, at 40 or 45 look like today's 70 year olds.
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You're missing a basic observation, about the women. Those big families of a dozen or more children were not found under a cabbage leaf. The women in those old photos look old for a reason. They were prematurely aged and died young because of an unending succession of pregnancies and childbirth.

Women in pioneer times were treated like brood mares. Men wanted children to help with the work on the farm and homestead. When a wife died under the load of hard work and endless pregnancy, the widower simply looked around for a replacement wife.
 

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Prepared Firebird
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No one can get more time, no matter how much money they have. Time is one of the few elements that is fairly portioned out in life. Everyone gets the same 24-hour time span in life, each day.

What we need is to realize that everyone in developed countries has been living in an artifically accelerated time concept. Instant communication......just whip out the cell phone. Instant coffee. Fast food. Microwave dinners. Jet travel. Fast cars. Instant access to information........just turn on the computer.

As we went thru the 20th century, we were bombarded with an endless parade of "time-saving" inventions that quickly became things we thought we could not live without. (Funny how all those time-saving inventions ended up making us work a lot harder just to earn the money to buy them, though.......isn't it??)

What we have to re-learn is the art of slowing down. Unfortunately, this will be nearly impossible for the current "wired" generation.
 

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No this is not about telling time nor about rushing preps against a looming disaster. It is instead a observation about the time it takes to do things in a self-sufficient living arrangement.

Take for instance I was reading up on cold smoking ham that done right would preserve it practically forever. This came from a old cookbook I have. Just the salting of the meat took days and than 10 days of keeping a smoke fire going to get it preserved properly. Many of the other methods of food producing, gathering, preservation were also time consuming. You look around at the work previous generations had to do to wrest a living and if you are not simply amazed at the effort, you fail to understand the time spent on it.

In the US today I think most people expect stuff to happen immediately. That many are not prepared in a rather vital area, shear patience. I see where people start to lose tempers simply because they get slowed down on the freeway to the point they want to whip out a gun and kill someone. 2 minutes of delay is intolerable. I wonder what that personality trait will do when facing sitting all day waiting, hoping for a deer to pass by. Or having to spend all day getting rocks out of a field.

At any rate it just struck me that one thing to prepare for is time.
Time is a luxury we don't have ! :mad: get your affairs in order,
God ,Family, food, medical and a means to protect all....." hint"
A short temper won't last long in a SHTF world !...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Time is a luxury we don't have ! ...
Sometimes you have to take the time. Even when things are at their most rushed, acting without doing the thinking will end up costing you more time than you saved. There are good reasons to be methodical. Now if you are in a High Noon shoot out, being able to draw quicker with down range accuracy, will be more important than taking your time. But that comes from much time spent ahead practicing your speed draw. :cool:
 

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I wish there was more time in the day as it is.... I'm so used to multitasking, that if there ever was an event that threw us all back to the 19th century I would be bored out of my mind doing one thing for hours if not days at a time... One of the reasons I don't wish for a SHTF moment.
 

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This thing about time and the most effeicent use of it...What do you think your dying thought would be if it happened to you tonight? - Gee, I wish I could have more time to finish that bunker I was building OR just one more minute with your family?
 
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*************************

You're missing a basic observation, about the women. Those big families of a dozen or more children were not found under a cabbage leaf. The women in those old photos look old for a reason. They were prematurely aged and died young because of an unending succession of pregnancies and childbirth.

Women in pioneer times were treated like brood mares. Men wanted children to help with the work on the farm and homestead. When a wife died under the load of hard work and endless pregnancy, the widower simply looked around for a replacement wife.
My point was related to the original question -- the time and sheer labor involved in maintaining daily life. My great-grandmother had only two children, but was an old woman at fifty because of the unremitting labor -- her daughter, my grandmother, had six children (out of ten pregnancies), and had a very rough time during the Depression, but eventually owned a vacuum cleaner, an electric iron, etc. and was an attractive woman into her eighties. I know several women with large families who don't look old. It's not the just children, it's the work.
 
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