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Red White and Blue
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The Pennsylvania Game Commission is testing deer for the presence of chemicals similar to those found in Maine that resulted in a “do not eat” advisory.
According to Game Commission spokesman Travis Lau, the action is in response to an October 2021 “do not eat” advisory for Pennsylvania fish in the Neshaminy Creek basin in Bucks and Montgomery counties due to extremely high levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). All of the samples will be taken from deer in Tyler State Park, which is part of the basin, and testing will be done to detect “forever chemicals,” or PFAS, which is in the same group of chemical substances as PFOS.


apparently past toxic waste (from coal mines etc)

also a problem in Maine


The discovery of “forever chemicals” in deer in central Maine and the subsequent guidance to not eat the meat raises serious questions about whether it is safe to consume venison killed in areas of the state where high levels of the chemicals have been detected or are suspected to exist.
The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife on Tuesday issued a “do not eat” advisory for deer meat killed in the Fairfield area, warning hunters who killed deer from that area to throw away the venison.
Five of the eight deer tested by the state were found to have high levels of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), manufactured materials often referred to as “forever chemicals.” They are used in numerous industrial and household products, and have been found to present health risks in humans.


slude from wastewater treatment is also suspected as a source.

anyone with any firsthand knowledge of?
 

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The Pennsylvania Game Commission is testing deer for the presence of chemicals similar to those found in Maine that resulted in a “do not eat” advisory.
According to Game Commission spokesman Travis Lau, the action is in response to an October 2021 “do not eat” advisory for Pennsylvania fish in the Neshaminy Creek basin in Bucks and Montgomery counties due to extremely high levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). All of the samples will be taken from deer in Tyler State Park, which is part of the basin, and testing will be done to detect “forever chemicals,” or PFAS, which is in the same group of chemical substances as PFOS.


apparently past toxic waste (from coal mines etc)

also a problem in Maine


The discovery of “forever chemicals” in deer in central Maine and the subsequent guidance to not eat the meat raises serious questions about whether it is safe to consume venison killed in areas of the state where high levels of the chemicals have been detected or are suspected to exist.
The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife on Tuesday issued a “do not eat” advisory for deer meat killed in the Fairfield area, warning hunters who killed deer from that area to throw away the venison.
Five of the eight deer tested by the state were found to have high levels of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), manufactured materials often referred to as “forever chemicals.” They are used in numerous industrial and household products, and have been found to present health risks in humans.


slude from wastewater treatment is also suspected as a source.

anyone with any firsthand knowledge of?
water is a "forever chemical."
 

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Figures that this would happen in the Eastern side of PA near Philly. World of difference between W and E PA. W = Heartland, E = Big City East coast mentality.
Near philly is/was a very industrial to serve the city. With lax laws decades ago I'm not suprised theres contamination. Same goes for nearly all of the area around NYC. The Hudson river also has major contamination as it's been an industry drainage ditch for over a century.
 

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My Hero Was Derion Albert
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Valley creek that runs through valleyforge national park has a lot of trout with heavy metal and PCB contamination. Its a no harvest artificial lures only creek
If the game commission bans hunting deer in SEPA the population will explode as it is already really high.
You can tell when your deer herd is getting too big when you can see everything green eaten off at about 4 feet in the woods and heavy brush, and I have seen that national park (no hunting allowed) look like this.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I live in Central Maine. I have been involved with fighting landfills here. In our public hearings we learned that all landfills are required to have liners under them, and so far every liner ever used has leaked. Our landfill primarily takes Municipal Waste from out of state and from Quebec [out of country]. Our local landfill is getting close to reaching its full capacity. Rainwater percolates down through the waste as 'leachate' which then drains into our river. Some of the leachate is collected and hauled to a nearby town, then dumped into their Municipal water treatment plant, before flowing into the river. All of this is legal, and carefully monitored but it creates a toxic environment.
 

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Some of the grand children of the original people who ingested the milk from contaminated cows are still above national average. A flame retardant was mixed in with cattle feed in the 70’s. Good thing my family moved from Michigan in the 60’s and back in the 90’s.

 

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Valley creek that runs through valleyforge national park has a lot of trout with heavy metal and PCB contamination. Its a no harvest artificial lures only creek
If the game commission bans hunting deer in SEPA the population will explode as it is already really high.
You can tell when your deer herd is getting too big when you can see everything green eaten off at about 4 feet in the woods and heavy brush, and I have seen that national park (no hunting allowed) look like this.
It's a crime to think of how we've fowled our waterways and streams. The Green deal crowd needs to look at water way pollution and focus on tangible eco clean up, not bankrupting us with there la la land ideas.
 

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It's a crime to think of how we've fowled our waterways and streams. The Green deal crowd needs to look at water way pollution and focus on tangible eco clean up, not bankrupting us with there la la land ideas.
90% of environmentalists are morons who leave piles of refuse after every ecological "protest". Our government agencies and any "green" policies are less about the environment and more about corruption, mostly by grossly incompetent bureaucrats. I will acknowledge that we've had some companies do some serious damage to the local ecosystems and waterways, which is where EPA oversight and "assistance" needs to be.

I think most outdoors conservatives are far more involved and better stewards of the lands they hunt, fish, hike/camp, etc. These problems should drive the solutions we should be getting from our high taxes; instead we get ECO terrorists, draconian regulations, bloated bureaucracies, little oversight from bribed bureaucrats, and anti-hunting/fishing environmentalists who spend no time in those environments.

Sad situations for all of us.

ROCK6
 

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The Pennsylvania Game Commission is testing deer for the presence of chemicals similar to those found in Maine that resulted in a “do not eat” advisory.
According to Game Commission spokesman Travis Lau, the action is in response to an October 2021 “do not eat” advisory for Pennsylvania fish in the Neshaminy Creek basin in Bucks and Montgomery counties due to extremely high levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). All of the samples will be taken from deer in Tyler State Park, which is part of the basin, and testing will be done to detect “forever chemicals,” or PFAS, which is in the same group of chemical substances as PFOS.


apparently past toxic waste (from coal mines etc)

also a problem in Maine


The discovery of “forever chemicals” in deer in central Maine and the subsequent guidance to not eat the meat raises serious questions about whether it is safe to consume venison killed in areas of the state where high levels of the chemicals have been detected or are suspected to exist.
The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife on Tuesday issued a “do not eat” advisory for deer meat killed in the Fairfield area, warning hunters who killed deer from that area to throw away the venison.
Five of the eight deer tested by the state were found to have high levels of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), manufactured materials often referred to as “forever chemicals.” They are used in numerous industrial and household products, and have been found to present health risks in humans.


slude from wastewater treatment is also suspected as a source.

anyone with any firsthand knowledge of?
Still better than eating good from a store
 
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