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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Digging up Potatoes


As crazy as it sounds, some people have never dug up potatoes. Years ago, this was a common practice on farms, where most of the familes food came straight from the garden.


Digging potatoes is a simple straight forward thing to do, you just dig them up. Usually, the tops of the potatoes can be grabbed and gently pulled out of the ground. Sometimes this will result in the potatoes remaining attached to the stalk.


The example below is a bunch of red skin potatoes grown in my home garden.



After the tops of the potato plants have been removed, use your hands and dig around in the soft soil. Potatoes will grow all around the potato plant, not just at the base of the potato top.



Extreme care should be used to prevent the bruising of the potatoes. One of the easiest way to bruise the potato is by dropping into a bucket. When using a large bucket, such as a 5 gallon, lower the potato to the bottom of the bucket by hand. Try not to "drop" the potato into the bucket, as the fall will bruise the potato and hasten rotting.


While digging up the potatoes from my home garden, I used a small 1 gallon bucket. This bucket is an ice cream container. It was bought from a local grocery store with ice cream in it. After the ice cream was ate, the bucket was washed out and is the perfect size when gathering food from your home garden.



The whole area around the plant should be dug up to make sure all the potatoes have been harvested. There is a slight chance, if any of the potatoes were missed, they may sprout next spring.


Once the potatoes have been dug up, they should be moved out of direct sunlight as soon as possible. Sunlight causes the skin of the potato to turn green. If the potato is left in direct sunlight and the skin turns green, it should not be eaten.


After the potatoes have been dug up, the dirt should be removed and the potato should be left to dry in a cool spot out of direct sunlight. While the potatoes are drying after being washed, roll them several times and wipe them with a dry cloth. If extra water is left on the potato, this will promote the growth of mold.



The end result:

These potatoes have been washed, dried and ready for storage. If stored properly, these potatoes will stay edible for several months. Some of these potatoes will be saved and used as seed for next years garden.
 

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not a nut
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I have a question for potato growers. I was told to only use certified seed potatoes that store bought potatoes wouldn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How do you know when they are ready to pick, planted potatoes for the first time and not sure when to tell that they are ready.
When the tops die, the potatoes are ready to be dug up.
 

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Guss Chiggins
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bags

You can grow patatos is bags as well, I did it this year. all you have to do is sew a cubic bag out of garden fabric, fill with dirt, put in you spuds, fill with more dirt and sit on porch, water as well of course. when tops die move bag to garden area cut open and tumble the tater out.
 

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My crop was disappointing this year. Only got about a 3 gallon bucket full. They died off early. I think bugs got to them. Next year I'm trying the tire stack method I've read so much about. As for using the stor bought potatos, as long as they grow eyes they should work.
 

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"Certified seed potatoes" are to be without fungus and wireworms.

Planting contaminated potatoes contaminates the land, and future potato crops will also be infected. Then you have to avoid planting potatoes for a decade or so to let the pathogens die.

Basically, certified potatoes are worth it in good times. After tshtf then plant what your have.
 

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"Certified seed potatoes" are to be without fungus and wireworms.

Planting contaminated potatoes contaminates the land, and future potato crops will also be infected. Then you have to avoid planting potatoes for a decade or so to let the pathogens die.

Basically, certified potatoes are worth it in good times. After tshtf then plant what your have.
Yes, potato blight can be a problem with store bought potatoes. They can carry viruses as well, which make the tubers grow smaller.
 

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As mentioned above, 'Certified Seed Potatoes' are supposed to be fungus, mold, and disease-free, plus inoculated with plant foods. Store-boughts work good, too, just cut 'em up so there is an eye in each piece, as the eye is what grows. We always had to dig ours with a mattock. Most of our neighbors just plowed theirs out using a cutting stock plow with the cutter removed, or a turning plow.
KY Jim
 

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The great potato famine of Ireland came because eventually potatoes will have disease. That's why the dirt you plant potatoes in this year should not be used for a couple of years. If you don't buy seed potatoes you do stand the risk of bringing blight to your dirt and then it can't be used for potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, any relatives. I too have used store bought potatoes in the past but I don't anymore just to be safe. I also only grow my potatoes in garbage cans now. It just keeps my garden safe. Potatoes are big disease spreaders which was proven when thousands of people died because of this or had to move to the United States and start over because their soil was destroyed by potato blight.

Tury
 
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