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First video for my new youtube channel. This is an exciting time of year, simply because the weather is getting nice and everything is coming back to life after winter.


How does everyone feel about GMO crops? Are they really needed?

Remember Golden Rice? It has yet to be cultivated for mass production. All the hype of all the good it was going to do, and so far, nothing has been done with it.
 

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feel about GMO crops? Are they really needed?
It is just a money maker for Monsanto. Once you grow Roundup resistant crops, it is all you can grow in that soil. It takes years to reduce soil contamination and farmers can not afford to take that land out of production for that long.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I am against Genetic Modification in plants. When the technology can be used to treat diseases in humans, I am okay with it. But only within that limited scope.

I think this is a pandora box that will let loose some really bad stuff.

IMHO, using GMOs everywhere will eventually prove to have been a really bad idea.
 

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Great topic for a video!

To clarify slightly - the reason the hybrid mule is sterile is because the cross is between two distinct and different species (Equus ferus and Equus africanus). Think of it as Mother Nature's way of "disapproving", sorry mule, no baby mules for you. However, Mother Nature has nothing against a cross between a jalapeño pepper and a cowhorn pepper since the cross is within the same species (Capsicum annuum). There is no reason to suspect infertile seeds in the progeny and in fact crosses within species are typical methods of developing new varieties.

On a related point - the key factor for saving seeds is that the variety is open-pollinated (OP). Heirloom simply implies the variety has been grown reliably for at least 50 years.
 

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It is just a money maker for Monsanto. Once you grow Roundup resistant crops, it is all you can grow in that soil. It takes years to reduce soil contamination and farmers can not afford to take that land out of production for that long.
Really? Funny how a lot of farmers will grow wheat after soybeans. There's no Round Up Ready wheat approved to be grown anywhere in the world. Round Up doesn't sterilize the ground.
 

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A GMO cultivar like any new and unknown plant species needs to be evaluated for all conceivable issues. If it serves my purposes which foremost gives a good yield of something I want then it is fine.
I have an heirloom peach called Roddenbury that I am most enthusiastic about. The typical commercial peach or nectarine get attacked by borers and declines on my place. Other diseases also attack them. If the heirloom can survive the diseases that occur in our humid, hot NWFL climate I want them. I also have what is in effect an heirloom apple called joy that grows on my place without spraying called joy. It was found growing at an old homestead not far from Tallashassee. Not the best tasting apple, but it matures early and is bullet proof. I grow it and Anna a modern non-heirloom apple because it also does not require spraying, although the other day I had to remove four webworm nests from it.
Hybrids, I like them, but the only downside is that the seeds are most often not so useful, but if the seeds are normally available than all is good. But since many our seeds do come from china, any disruption of world trade could end the availability of seeds. So that is the downside of most hybrids.
I am pragmatic and choose what seems to work. I see all of the people that get so upset about GMO to the point it becomes a religion with them. Once some belief becomes an item of faith saying anything that contradicts, regardless of how strong the evidence, faith will win.
 

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On a related point - the key factor for saving seeds is that the variety is open-pollinated (OP). Heirloom simply implies the variety has been grown reliably for at least 50 years.
I've been trying to explain that for years. But there's no getting past the mindset that it's either hybrid or heirloom. I finally just gave up. If people are only buying heirlooms, they're shortchanging themselves on the much wider number of OP varieties that may perform even better for them.
 

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It is just a money maker for Monsanto. Once you grow Roundup resistant crops, it is all you can grow in that soil. It takes years to reduce soil contamination and farmers can not afford to take that land out of production for that long.
Here's another incorrect mindset. Nothing about this post makes any sense.
 

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Here's another incorrect mindset. Nothing about this post makes any sense.
Most of the anti-GMO people do not want to be confused by facts.

For the moment most GMOs that that I am familiar with are intended for commercial farming. I hope eventually the GMO technology will begin producing things that I can use. Like put what ever genes that chickasaw plums have to fight off borers into peaches along with resistance to fungal attacks. It is very difficult to grow stone fruit in the south east without spraying a lot of pesticides. The latest enemy in the eastern USA is the ambrosia beetle and the fungus that it introduces to many southern fruit trees. What I see now days is reminiscent of the old time weavers throwing their wooden shoes (Sabots) into the machinery of the new textile mills. In long run it was not able to stop that technology and since there is money in GMO it will also survive.
 

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It is just a money maker for Monsanto. Once you grow Roundup resistant crops, it is all you can grow in that soil. It takes years to reduce soil contamination and farmers can not afford to take that land out of production for that long.
More 100% dead wrong BS.

It’s okay to despise glyphosate and be against its use.
However, you make a better case if you actually know what you’re
talking about.

The fact is that one of the great things about glyphosate is that you can kill
back a flush of weeds/grasses and immediately plant whatever crop it is
that you’re growing, Roundup Resistant or not. There is no residual soil activity.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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It is just a money maker for Monsanto. Once you grow Roundup resistant crops, it is all you can grow in that soil. It takes years to reduce soil contamination and farmers can not afford to take that land out of production for that long.
I see a lot of news articles about Round-up residue in the soil, and now in our water-table.

The company says it has a short half-life. Scientists say otherwise.
 

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I see a lot of news articles about Round-up residue in the soil, and now in our water-table.

The company says it has a short half-life. Scientists say otherwise.
The residues will not prevent other plants from growing in the treated soil. It is best of course to pull up every weed by the roots, but it is a lot work. I am going out now to use a new sprayer. I use high concentrations of generic round up and 2,4 D and still have a lot of trouble killing green briar. For run away bamboo I cult the stalks and spay directly into the hollow of the tube.
 

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I don't like and won't grow GMO stuff. But love both hybrids and heirlooms. Like heirlooms because you can get some really different looking stuff than what you normally see. I like them for the uniqueness factor a lot. But I plant hybrids too. As far as GMO goes I have several issues with it. Monsanto runs roughshod over a lot of farmers. IMO. Although there is technically a difference between GMO vs roundup ready. Maybe I'm just old fashioned.
 

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I don't like and won't grow GMO stuff. But love both hybrids and heirlooms. Like heirlooms because you can get some really different looking stuff than what you normally see. I like them for the uniqueness factor a lot. But I plant hybrids too. As far as GMO goes I have several issues with it. Monsanto runs roughshod over a lot of farmers. IMO. Although there is technically a difference between GMO vs roundup ready. Maybe I'm just old fashioned.
All roundup ready seed ( corn, soy, canola, sugar beets)is GMO. GMO can provide other traits beside glyphosphate resistance.

Note there are other sources of roundup ready seeds besides Monsanto. They call themselves glyphosate ready of course, Monsanto still holds the trademark on roundup even after the patent expired.
 

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True. Roundup ready is GMO. Just saying that what GMO really means is that it's genetically modified. So if a gardener crosses two plants to create something new is it genetically modified? I get around this in my mind by generally saying that GMO is made in a lab. Everything else is okay for me. Just a weird quirk I have.
 

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Remember Golden Rice? It has yet to be cultivated for mass production. All the hype of all the good it was going to do, and so far, nothing has been done with it.
IIRC although the first field trials of Golden Rice date back to 2004(ish?), the FDA just this year approved harvest for human consumption.
It is a prolific grower, and time will tell regarding risk vs reward.
 
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