Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What exactly is diatomaceous earth? I think it's also used in some swimming pool filters? That's all I know about it. I am totally in the dark on this subject, so please be kind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,817 Posts
Diatoms live in the ocean, they are very very small organisms that create a silica shell around them. When they die the shell sinks to the bottom of the ocean.

The sea floor collects billions of tons of this in the muck, when this is raised above sea level the muck becomes clay with diatoms in it hence Diatomacious earth.

You could learn more by going to an encyclopedia but this gives the basic understanding of what it is.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
DO NOT USE POOL DE FOR ANYTHING ASSOCIATED WITH FOOD.....there is a FOOD grade DE that is available from most ag stores like Southern States and Tractor Supply....POOL grade can kill you!!!

Here is a thread that me and some others gave good info on DE :)


http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=28968&highlight=diatomaceous+earth




_________________________________________________
❤❤ someones out there loves me as much as i love them ❤❤
 

·
Bravo Zulu
Joined
·
13,133 Posts
What exactly is diatomaceous earth? I think it's also used in some swimming pool filters? That's all I know about it. I am totally in the dark on this subject, so please be kind.
Basically, it's kitty litter/oil absorber.

Diatomaceous earth (pronounced /ˌdaɪ.ətəˌmeɪʃəs ˈɜrθ/) also known as diatomite or kieselgur, is a naturally occurring, soft, siliceous sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 1 micrometre to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres.[1] This powder has an abrasive feel, similar to pumice powder, and is very light, due to its high porosity. The typical chemical composition of oven dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% silica, with 2 to 4% alumina (attributed mostly to clay minerals) and 0.5 to 2% iron oxide.[1]
Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae. It is used as a filtration aid, mild abrasive, mechanical insecticide,[2] absorbent for liquids, cat litter, activator in blood clotting studies, and a stabilizing component of dynamite. As it is also heat-resistant, it can be used as a thermal insulator.
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
Basically, it's kitty litter/oil absorber.



Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth
NO its nothing like kitty litter....it is classed as a non toxic naturally derived pesticide (fossilized remains of a type of algae) that is added to some grain products and used by humans and animals to stay pest free on the inside :thumb:



You can also take DE (food grade) yourself, it keeps your system clean (of worms and other parasites).

Use DE (Diatomaceous earth) (make sure it is food grade the same kind you use for your grains)to (for humans and animals) naturally control worms, fleas, flies and common pests found around animals.

It is a microscopic and organic way to control pests.

If food grade is used it perfectly safe for humans and animals to ingest (its added to Bisquick bread mixes) however if you find pool grade DE run the other way It can KILL YOU and your animals!!!

Here is a great place to learn about food grade DE, it gives you the dosage for humans and pets:



Daily recommended food grade diatomaceous earth feeding rates:

Kittens - 1/2 teaspoon
Cats - 1 teaspoon
Puppies - 1/2 to 1 tsp.
Dogs under 35 lbs. - 1 teaspoon
Dogs over 35 lbs. - 1 tablespoon
Dogs over 100 lbs. - 2 tablespoons
Cattle, Dairy Cows, & Hogs - 2% of dry feed ration
Chickens - 5% in feed
Goats & Sheep - 2% in grain
Horses - 1/2 to 1 cup in daily ration
*Humans - 1 heaping tablespoon daily




http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/defaq.html

In small quanities it is not dangerous, the minute amount that goes into the bisquick is very very small. Hubbers Granny use to work for a grain company (late 90's early 2000's) they added it to the grains going to other grain distributers to keep pests out. It breaks down there exo-skeleton and has no effect on our bodies. It has been used for years and is in alot of items you eat everyday.




Wiki page on DE


Diatomaceous earth
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A sample of diatomaceous earthDiatomaceous earth (pronounced /ˌdaɪətəˈmeɪʃəs ˈɝθ/), also known as DE, TSS, diatomite, diahydro, kieselguhr, kieselgur or celite) is a naturally occurring, soft, chalk-like sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. This powder has an abrasive feel, similar to pumice powder, and is very light, due to its high porosity. The typical chemical composition of diatomaceous earth is 86% silica, 5% sodium, 3% magnesium and 2% iron.

Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of diatoms, a type of hard-shelled algae. It is used as a filtration aid, as a mild abrasive, as a mechanical insecticide, as an absorbent for liquids, as cat litter, as an activator in blood clotting studies, and as a component of dynamite. As it is also heat-resistant, it can be used as a thermal insulator.

Contents [hide]
1 Applications
1.1 Industrial
1.2 Filtration
1.3 Abrasive
1.4 Pest control
1.5 Absorbent
1.6 Thermal
1.7 Hydroponics
1.8 DNA purification
2 Geology
3 Specific varieties
4 Climatologic importance
5 Safety considerations
6 See also
7 References
8 External links



[edit] Applications

[edit] Industrial
In 1866, Alfred Nobel discovered that nitroglycerin could be made much more stable if absorbed in diatomite. This allows much safer transport and handling than nitroglycerin in its raw form. He patented this mixture as dynamite in 1867, and the mixture is also referred to as guhr dynamite.


[edit] Filtration

Individual diatom cell walls often maintain their shape even in commercially processed filter media, such as this one for swimming poolsThe most common use (68%)[citation needed] of diatomaceous earth is as a filter medium, especially for swimming pools. It has a high porosity, because it is composed of microscopically-small, coffin-like, hollow particles. It is used in chemistry under the name Celite as a filtration aid, to filter very fine particles that would otherwise pass through or clog filter paper. It is also used to filter water, particularly in the drinking water treatment process and in fish tanks, and other liquids, such as beer and wine. It can also filter syrups and sugar. Other industries such as paper, paints, ceramics, soap and detergents use it as a fulling material.


[edit] Abrasive
The oldest use of diatomite is as a very mild abrasive and, for this purpose, it has been used both in toothpaste and in metal polishes, as well as in some facial scrubs.


[edit] Pest control
Diatomite is also used as an insecticide, due to its physico-sorptive properties. The fine powder absorbs lipids from the waxy outer layer of insects' exoskeletons, causing them to dehydrate. Arthropods die as a result of the water pressure deficiency, based on Fick's law of diffusion. This also works against gastropods and is commonly employed in gardening to defeat slugs. However, since slugs inhabit humid environments, efficacy is very low. It is sometimes mixed with an attractant or other additives to increase its effectiveness. Medical-grade diatomite is sometimes used to de-worm both animals and humans. It is most commonly used in lieu of boric acid, and can be used to help control and eventually eliminate a cockroach infestation. This material has wide application in control of insects of grain storage.

Diatomaceous earth also has important pest reduction applications in the treatment of bedbugs. Bedbugs have made an unfortunate comeback and are very difficult to treat. Products with an attractant element have shown documented effectiveness with reducing and eliminating bedbug populations. Many current products are effective and safe for humans and pets.[citation needed]

Disadvantages of using diatomaceous earth for pest control include the health risk to humans (see below), and the harm it does to many beneficial insects, including predatory beetles and bugs and many detritivores.


[edit] Absorbent
Its absorbent qualities make it useful for spill clean-up and the U.S. Center for Disease Control recommends it to clean up toxic liquid spills. These qualities also lend themselves to use in facial masks to absorb excess oils.

It has been employed as a primary ingredient in a type of cat litter. The type of silica used in cat litter comes from freshwater sources and does not pose a significant health risk to pets or humans.


[edit] Thermal
Its thermal properties enable it to be used as the barrier material in some fire resistant safes.


[edit] Hydroponics
Freshwater diatomite can be used as a growing medium in hydroponic gardens.

It is also used as a growing medium in potted plants, particularly as bonsai soil. Bonsai enthusiasts use it as a soil additive, or pot a bonsai tree in 100% Diatomaceous earth. Like perlite, vermiculite, and expanded clay, it retains water and nutrients while draining fast and freely allowing high oxygen circulation within the growing medium.


[edit] DNA purification
Diatomite (Celite) can be used for the removal of DNA in the presence of a highly concentrated chaotropic agent such as sodium iodide, guanidinium hydrochloride and guanidinium thiocyanate. As with other silicates, the diatomites will remove double stranded DNA but not RNA or proteins. The DNA can be extracted from the diatomites using low ionic strength buffers, including water, at neutral to slightly alkaline pH. Crude diatomites of a uniform size must first be washed in a heated acid such as 5M HCl[1]. Calcination can further improve consistency of the material, while mild caustic treatment may improve adsorption with lower levels of chaotrophs.


[edit] Geology
Please help improve this article or section by expanding it. Further information might be found on the talk page or at requests for expansion. (January 2007)

Because diatomite forms from the remains of water-borne diatoms, it is found close to either current or former bodies of water. It is generally divided into two categories based upon source: freshwater and saltwater. Freshwater diatomite is mined from dry lakebeds and is characteristically low in crystalline silica content. Saltwater diatomite contains a high crystalline silica content, making it a useful material for filters, due to the sieve-like features of the crystals.


[edit] Specific varieties
TripoliteDakine is the variety found in Tripoli, Libya.
Bann clay is the variety found in the Lower Bann valley in Northern Ireland.
Moler (Mo-clay) is the variety found in northwestern Denmark, especially on the islands of Fur and Mors.

[edit] Climatologic importance
The Earth's climate is affected by dust in the atmosphere, so locating major sources of atmospheric dust is important for climatology. Recent research indicates that surface deposits of diatomaceous earth play an important role. For instance, the largest single atmospheric dust source is the Bodélé depression in Chad, where storms push diatomite gravel over dunes, generating dust by abrasion.[2]


[edit] Safety considerations
The absorbent qualities of diatomite can result in a significant drying of the hands, if handled without gloves. The saltwater (industrial) form contains a highly crystalline form of silica, resulting in sharp edges. The sharpness of this version of the material makes it dangerous to breathe and a dust mask is recommended when working with it.

The type of hazard posed by inhalation depends on the form of the silica. Crystalline silica poses a serious inhalation hazard because it can cause silicosis. Amorphous silica can cause dusty lungs, but does not carry the same degree of risk as crystalline silica. Food-grade diatomite generally contains very low percentages of crystalline silica. Diatomite produced for pool filters is treated with heat, causing the formerly amorphous silicon dioxide to assume its crystalline form.
In the United States, the crystalline silica content in the dusts is regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and there are guidelines for the maximum amounts allowable in the product and in the air near the breathing zone of workers.[3]


[edit] See also
Biomineralization
Diatom
Fuller's Earth
Perlite

[edit] References
^ Goren R, BaykaraT, Marsoglu M. A study on the purification of diatomite in hydrochloric acid (2002). Scand. J. of Metallurgy 31:115-119
^ Washington et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 33 (2006) L09401 doi:10.1029/2006GL025827.
^ Inert Dusts at Kansas State University

[edit] External links
International Chemical Safety Card 0248
Diatomite: Statistics and Information - USGS
Tripolite: Tripolite mineral data Citat: "...A diatomaceous earth consisting of opaline silica..."
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH: A Non Toxic Pesticide
Photograph of diatomite deposits along River Bann, Ireland
Raising Poultry using Diatomacious Earth - Article by the Poultry Youth Association
All Diatomaceous Earth is not the Same- Article by Wallace Tharp
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth"



_________________________________________________
❤❤ Someones out there loves me as much as I love them ❤❤
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
You just posted a Wikipedia article that says that it's used for cat litter. Where I live, that's kitty litter.
Its added to cat litter....not used entirely for cat litter....in large amounts it is a dangerous to inhale in small amounts its harmless:thumb:

No matter where it is used it is used in small amounts as in teaspoons and not large amounts :)


Functions

The most common use of diatomaceous earth for cats is as a flea treatment and preventative. The DE can be rubbed into fur, causing no damage to the cat, but killing any mature fleas the cat may have. It can also be sprinkled onto the cat's bedding and around the home to kill any mature fleas that are present.

When a small amount of food grade diatomaceous earth is added to the cat's food, the DE can help to kill internal parasites, viruses and harmful bacteria the cat may have. The DE will pass through the cat's digestive system, absorbing the bacteria so that it is passed out during defecation.

Finally, the DE can also be added to the cat's litter box to boost the absorbency of the litter as well as help control odor. As DE is a fine powder, it is only necessary to add a small amount to the litter box.


Read more: Diatomaceous Earth for Cats | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5479904_diatomaceous-earth-cats.html#ixzz1T6WVvetD

_________________________________________________
❤❤ Someones out there loves me as much as I love them ❤❤
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,138 Posts
I use DE both inside and outside the home for insect control and flea abatement on my cats. as was said do not use anything other then food grade. pool de for filters has other chemicals which are not good for you. if used for flea powder watch the pets eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,817 Posts
Out of morbid curiosity... why on earth would a person be eating diatomacious earth?

I know that adding it to animal feed reduces the toxic effects of black mold on the animal, but I have never heard of humans eating it before.
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
23,954 Posts
Its added to cat litter....not used entirely for cat litter....in large amounts it is a dangerous to inhale in small amounts its harmless
From what I have read it is always dangerous to inhale.

Always!

Always!

Never allow any D.E. to become airborne! Always wear a breathing filter when handling D.E.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
From what I have read it is always dangerous to inhale.

Always!

Always!

Never allow any D.E. to become airborne! Always wear a breathing filter when handling D.E.
TRUE for pool grade but the FDA has said that food grade which contains less crystal sillica than pool grade is safe in small amounts (we use it out in our barns and barnyards once a year-we dust the area and have never had any drying affects to the lungs which is what happens if you inhale it).

It has been allowed to be added to food products for years and is not required to be put on the labels except under the inert ingredients list found on many labels.

You should never breath in ANY powder (baby powder....butt powder....makeup powder etc) as it does the same thing to the lungs as DE would do....it dries out the lining of your lungs:thumb:


Out of morbid curiosity... why on earth would a person be eating diatomacious earth?

I know that adding it to animal feed reduces the toxic effects of black mold on the animal, but I have never heard of humans eating it before.
Because it is a naturally occurring product and contains no chemicals that can do you harm (other than breathing it into your lungs where it becomes a irritant and nothing more) it has been used for years and years to rid the Human body of pests such as worms that we all have (yes you have worms....they live in your intestines and stomach sometimes never being detected:eek:)....DE works by not poisoning these pests but simply drying there exoskeleton out....doing no harm to your body:thumb:


_________________________________________________
❤❤ Someones out there loves me as much as I love them ❤❤
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
23,954 Posts
TRUE for pool grade but the FDA has said that food grade which contains less crystal sillica than pool grade is safe in small amounts (we use it out in our barns and barnyards once a year-we dust the area and have never had any drying affects to the lungs which is what happens if you inhale it).

It has been allowed to be added to food products for years and is not required to be put on the labels except under the inert ingredients list found on many labels. ...
Mcmomx2 - I usually agree with all that you have to say. But on this issue I must disagree.

There was a medical term, can't seem to find it now, 'Cili-----' something. During your lifespan as you inhale things, some things break down and dissolve
, while something do not. Those things which do not jam into the tiny air sacs in your lungs where your lung must wrap them in a cyst to isolate each of them. As these particles [asbestos, D.E. whatever] accumulate, so also accumulates the volume of the scar tissue around them that is trying to protect the 'good' sacs.

My father inhales a lot of asbestos and D.E. over his life. Today he is down to like 5% lung capacity. He lives on an O2 bottle and suffers from pneumonia every year. Each year we think it is his last.

There is no 'cure' for this and they have changed the name so I can not seem to find it now. There is little treatment either.

There is no safe level that you can inhale.

Your lung tissue can not break down asbestos or D.E. once it gets into your lungs it stays there. Until you die.



I have an old box of D.E. I bought a decade ago. It has a label on it with health warnings, and it says not to breath the dust.

Modern or 'new' D.E. may be considered 'safe' by the FDA. But I do not trust the FDA.

Nor should you trust them.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
Mcmomx2 - I usually agree with all that you have to say. But on this issue I must disagree.

There was a medical term, can't seem to find it now, 'Cili-----' something. During your lifespan as you inhale things, some things break down and dissolve
, while something do not. Those things which do not jam into the tiny air sacs in your lungs where your lung must wrap them in a cyst to isolate each of them. As these particles [asbestos, D.E. whatever] accumulate, so also accumulates the volume of the scar tissue around them that is trying to protect the 'good' sacs.

My father inhales a lot of asbestos and D.E. over his life. Today he is down to like 5% lung capacity. He lives on an O2 bottle and suffers from pneumonia every year. Each year we think it is his last.

There is no 'cure' for this and they have changed the name so I can not seem to find it now. There is little treatment either.

There is no safe level that you can inhale.

Your lung tissue can not break down asbestos or D.E. once it gets into your lungs it stays there. Until you die.



I have an old box of D.E. I bought a decade ago. It has a label on it with health warnings, and it says not to breath the dust.

Modern or 'new' D.E. may be considered 'safe' by the FDA. But I do not trust the FDA.

Nor should you trust them.


I dont recommend breathing it in on purpose (like any powder- baby powder or otherwise) but DE like the others is a irritant to the lungs and yes overtime it can cause problems I agree but small minute amounts when inhaled the body can and does eventually rid itself of the irritant by the phlem that is coughed out....just like the baby powder and all you inhaled when your kiddos were babies :thumb: Asbestos is much much worse as it attaches to the lungs fibers and holds on for dear life:(


When taken internally (by humans or animals) it is added to a wet food so it cant be inhaled and instead taken to the stomach where it is sent through the digestive tract and dries out all the pests that live inside the tract.




_________________________________________________
❤❤ Someones out there loves me as much as I love them ❤❤
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
68,539 Posts
Out of morbid curiosity... why on earth would a person be eating diatomacious earth?

I know that adding it to animal feed reduces the toxic effects of black mold on the animal, but I have never heard of humans eating it before.
Really? Ever eaten Bisquick or other dry mix? They add it to keep out insects. It's also used in grain silos for the same purpose. You've eaten it a bunch of times and didn't realize it. Not only is it harmless to humans, it provides some trace minerals and in slightly larger doses, will remove any worms that a person might have in their digestive system.

It's a great natural way to keep animals worm free also, as well as keeping lice and fleas off them. Given in their food it will also keep flies from breeding in their droppings.

The stuff has so many uses around the house and farm that I've always been surprised that more people don't stock it. Especially considering how cheap it is and that a little amount goes a long way.
 

·
Certified Organic Grower
Joined
·
4,969 Posts
The only location where D.E. should never enter is in the respiratory system.

Like all powder type substances, they should not be inhaled.

Great for the digestive system tho...
 

·
thank you vets
Joined
·
274 Posts
Forest B
I think the word you are looking for is Silicosis.I have had this for about 10 years now,or I have known about it that long.I got mine while working in a steel foundry.Sometimes it's like having about 3 pounds of sand in the lungs and makes it difficult to breath.I truly feel for your father I know first hand what he is going through or to a point. I know mine is chronic now but have been told no matter what I do it will get worse.Didn't mean to derail the thread just wanted to clear this up for ya.
Act
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Forest B
I think the word you are looking for is Silicosis.I have had this for about 10 years now,or I have known about it that long.I got mine while working in a steel foundry.Sometimes it's like having about 3 pounds of sand in the lungs and makes it difficult to breath.I truly feel for your father I know first hand what he is going through or to a point. I know mine is chronic now but have been told no matter what I do it will get worse.Didn't mean to derail the thread just wanted to clear this up for ya.
Act
Bless your heart. I'll pray for you.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top