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Discussion Starter #1
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Anyone have a resource / s for commercial Prepper Foods suitable for a diabetic ?

Biggest concern is the CARB level of the food. The carbs must be extremely low.

Seems like most Prepper Foods depend on pasta, beans and potatoes / root vegetables. All of these are high in carbs.

Thanks.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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I have also noticed this phenomenon, which is why I don't have commercial long term storage food on my shelves.

What I've found:

I am very, very careful with fruit, because fruit itself is basically sugar, but there are regular everyday canned fruits now with no added sugar. I have a few cans on the shelves.

I skip plain potatoes, canned or otherwise, but I did added sweet potatoes to our canned goods because the vitamin content is significant, especially in relation to the carbs, and Bruce's canned yams are now available with Splenda instead of high fructose corn syrup and/or sugar. Ditto commercially canned carrots. The carrots don't have added sugar or sweeteners but they are intrinsically higher in carbs. They have significant nutrients for canned vegetables so I have them on the shelves to add judiciously to soups, stews and casseroles.

Canned peas are higher in carbs than other green vegetables but they are also higher in vitamins.

Canned greens have a LOT of vitamins for canned vegetables with very low carb count.
Canned collards, canned spinach, canned greens of all sorts.

I can our own beef (stew beef, ground beef) and pork (cubed boneless chops) that we can mix with the canned vegetables and our frozen vegetables for soups, stews, casseroles. The stew beef can stand in as roast beef with a little thickener (I use xanthan gum, order it from Amazon) in the juice from the jar. Don't let the price of xanthan gum blow you off; it takes just the tiniest pinch to thicken anything.

There are sugar free options for ketchup and barbecue sauce available as well, and I make a lot of our varied salad dressings, using mustard, mayonnaise, sugar free ketchup, olive oil, vinegar, herbs and spices, etc.

I have several bags of Splenda on the shelves, some almond flour, some coconut flour, and some whole wheat flour for the bit of bread we might use.

We have sugar free chocolate chips, sugar free chocolate mini-bars, unsweetened coconut flakes, and sugar free chocolate syrup here. Sugar free Jello and generics is always appropriate. Sugar free puddings are higher in carbs because of the powdered milk but certainly better than full sugar alternatives in commercial food storage.

For as long as power is available, frozen veggies and berries can augment your canned food.

Combining our home canned meats with various vegetables and tomatoes with spices, herbs and sauces actually produces a lot of variety.

All of these options are available at Walmart.

If you are managing with keto, you can find powdered heavy cream on Amazon. We also have powdered whole milk and powdered eggs as fats for baking. We keep these things in the freezer. You can use evaporated milk, butter and artificial sweetener to make sweetened condensed milk for baking. We keep butter in the freezer, and coconut oil has a decent long term shelf life.

So many resources recommend storing rice and beans and beans and rice and pasta pasta pasta, flour and dried potatoes for food storage.

I do have some beans on my shelves but I use them/eat them sparingly, not daily. I avoid rice and pasta completely. I do eat the occasional french fry but I don't keep them in the house. I do splurge on potato chips sometimes, which I probably shouldn't. But if I relied on beans and rice, pasta and flour and dried potatoes I'd totally wreck my blood sugar.

It's not as convenient as the freeze dried emergency food but we have a lot more variety and foods we like better.

I'm always amazed at how little meal variety is available in the one year emergency food storage supplies... =/

Hope this helps! :)
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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The classic rice and beans base is a bit problematic for diabetic preppers.

The beans being a lot less of an issue. It's the rice end that is worrisome.

Looking to other grains can help. Spelt, teff, buckwheat, oats, and barley have a lower glycemic load.

These alternatives should be considered your highest glycemic load food when you plan your preps.

Then stick to legumes and non fat and non carb dried veggies and meat/fat.

For the guilty sweet tooth, look to stevia. Unrefined stevia actually helps you maintain a healthy insulin sensitivity level. It's pretty easy to grow too.
 

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Stellar post OS.... :thumb:
 
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Wrong Side of Heaven
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Low carb and shelf stable

There are lots of low carb foods out there this is just mostly what is shelf stable and off the rack. Home gardening and dehydration its crash course time.

most LTS meals will push the carbs as they want the potential customers to see big numbers for their hard earned money. Your cheapest quick down and dirty are going to be individual items in cans, that also gives you more flexibility in meal preps.




Near ZERO---------
Canned meats, poultry, and fish (look to make sure not cured with sugar)
Olives
Pickles
FD eggs in can (also water glassed)
cheeses... wheels, FD, canned (look at numbers not all are low carb)
Alfalfa sprouts (stored as seeds)
many canned vegetables (look at numbers you can go from water cress near zero to peas,corn,potato... not for you)

There are too many other foods to list find a low carb site and look at their numbers and use for cross reference to shelf stable. Yes there are fresh and frozen options, that goes with out saying, and those go without power.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Came back to add that Costco had boxes of dried rice cauliflower on their shelf the last time we were there. We picked up a box while we were there. Haven't tried it yet as we still have frozen cauliflower in play. I'm sure it's fine, though.

Also I agree with Zeke on this: in my experience, rice was the worst culprit. Beans and legumes are not as bad as rice in that they are complex carbs and take a while to break down. The issue with beans, especially beans mixed in a dish with protein and fat, is that the blood glucose spike comes, but because your body is also processing the fat and protein, it arrives late. Ergo testing at the typical post prandial time of 75 minutes or so might miss it because the spike hasn't yet arrived.

Beans act sort of like a 'not quite so bad pizza's in this way.😆

Of course, it all depends on you as in individual, your medication, if you are controlling by diet alone, etc. Many things hold true generally but only you know which foods you can tolerate to what degree.

Quitting sugary drinks, rice and pasta, and cutting way back on breads and to almost no potatoes, and cutting out white flour, went quite a long way for me. But you do you. 😊
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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P.S. We also have sprouting seeds for fresh greens, and we just put in a late winter garden of spinach, mesclun, lettuces, and snow peas.

Also add: I have some experience with dehydrating. In my experience, vegetables are difficult to reconstitute to a texture one might want. I ended up stocking up on commercially frozen bags of peppers, onions and broccoli for stir fries. I also just blanched and froze several bags of celery for soups and stews.

Not the best situation in long term no power but if necessary, and if I have empty jars. I can use at least some of what's in the freezer to can up soups, etc.
 

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Caveat: I don't have diabetes and I don't do LTS but I thought this study might interest some of you-'Post-prandial glucose and insulin responses of hummus...': "The glycemic response of hummus consumed alone was less than one quarter that of white bread for the same amount of available carbohydrate. The GI of hummus was therefore very low (15 GI points on a glucose scale or 22 on a white bread scale) and was achieved without a significant increase in insulin levels and with lower and sustained blood glucose excursions. This suggests a slow release mechanism where the absorption rate of the carbohydrate component is slowed and prolonged over time possibly owing to the high viscous fiber content [15], the high ratio of amylose starch to amylopectin [23], and possibly the presence of enzymes inhibitors [24]. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose has been shown to decrease incident diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance individuals and decrease cardiovascular events [25, 26]. The GI of hummus was less than half of that of chickpeas alone (15 versus 36) [22]. The high and healthy (MUFA and PUFA) fat content of the hummus, 5 g/serving, is 6 times higher than that of chickpeas alone and may partly account for the very low GI observed in this study." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730744/
 

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reluctant sinner
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I'm a diabetic. I work hard to manage it with the meds and diet/exercise.

Storage food - I think that if I'm eating it, then I'll be doing hard manual labor like chopping wood, walking down to the lake to fish. I'd bet I can burn the carbs especially if I'm on reduced rations to try and extend my supplies.
 

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Premium Member
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So Natural rice has 8g carbs per 1/4th cup, no added sugar and it's sold at DollarTree.
Instead of spaghetti (pasta) use spaghetti squash.
Cauliflour has gotten popular as a substitute for potates or rice and it's sold in packages or you can buy fresh and can it. Not sure if it's sold in cans, but I think it could be.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Major Mjolnir, you are my new hero. <3 I love hummus more than life itself.

Hmmm, wonder if anyone makes a dried hummus powder that can be reconstituted with water and/ or oil???

Wonder if hummus freezes well?

Off to research... :)
 

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Master Mason
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Quitting sugary drinks, rice and pasta, and cutting way back on breads and to almost no potatoes, and cutting out white flour, went quite a long way for me. But you do you. 😊
This is me + the exercise. I can carefully do some carbs with portion control, but any form of potato sends my blood sugar skyrocketing.

It’s a lot of work, but I take very little insulin. My preps are designed for me. I have some MH food, but no pallets or buckets of carbs.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Just came back to add that I found bulk hummus powder with good reviews on Amazon, 10 lbs. for $72.27 with tax, free 2 day shipping with Amazon Prime, 44 cents/oz. Works for me! Gonna cross post to the Confess Your Sins thread, LOL.

I know, that's a lot to pay for hummus, but, hummus. It's delicious and full of good fat. It is its own food group. :)
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Also recently found bags of diced avocados in the frozen foods section of Walmart, and also recently learned that it's possible to freeze guacamole. :)
 

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Museum Piece
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We talking type 1 or type II?
Dont know squat about type I. Did beat type II a decade ago.
Its all about what food it is. I have a list of stuff I can not longer eat.
I do not eat them any more. In two years I went from 742 UAC to 255 UAC.
From critical to below average.
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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For me, Type II, now controlled with diet, i.e. the list of foods I don't est, or don't eat very much of. But there is some clin
 

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Hank Hill in Lingerie
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Sorry, on phone. I've run across some clinical evidence of a 'hybrid' between T1 and T2, although it's kinda anecdotal. My diet needed cleaning up, no doubt. I spent too many years running on bolus caffeine and sugar. So diet was def a factor for me. But T2 and the propensity for it runs on both sides of the family, so there also seems to he a genetic predisposition.
 

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Just came back to add that I found bulk hummus powder with good reviews on Amazon, 10 lbs. for $72.27 with tax, free 2 day shipping with Amazon Prime, 44 cents/oz. Works for me! Gonna cross post to the Confess Your Sins thread, LOL.

I know, that's a lot to pay for hummus, but, hummus. It's delicious and full of good fat. It is it's own food group. :)
You do know hummus it fairly easy to make from dried chickpeas, right? You can buy them for about $1 a pound. To make into hummus you soak them for an hour, simmer them for an hour then mash/grind them then add you seasoning and oil.

The dried hummus powder needs oil added to it as well.
 
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