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Rogue
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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My question is, why would anyone want to drink demineralized water? From what I have heard, the minerals in the water are good for your health.

Even though my water does not leave rust stains on the sinks, I have to replace my shower head every 3 - 4 years. The calcium build up clogs up the holes in the shower. So my water has "some" minerals in it, but I wish it had more.
 

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Destilled water is also demineralized.

I think rainwater is for a big part demineralized.

If you would want to rely on that for drinking water, maybe it's adviseable to store minerals. I know they make those but I don't know how it's called. Read it in a gun magazine a while ago, they jokingly called it water in powder form. What it really is, is the minerals from water in powder form.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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You need water. If demineralized water is what's available that's what you drink. You have to adjust your diet accordingly to account for that. If you use a katadyn or any other type of membrane pump filter you're drinking demineralized water. Your body will flush minerals as a normal part of body processes and those have to be replaced one way or another. Use Gatorade or whatever.
 

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Rogue
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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off-grid organic farmer
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A lot of people drink distilled water, sometimes for their entire lifespans.

I have drank distilled water for many years of my life.

I am not aware of any health problems caused by drinking distilled water.

'De-ionized' water causes health problems.
 

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When I was in the Navy distilled water was all there was to be had. I had the duty of running the evaporator as one of my jobs. You'd think the Navy would have some idea on the benefits or health risks of drinking this over an extended period of time since they've been at it for quite some time.

I can tell you, that when chilled, it was the best tasting water I've ever had. Definitely the cleanest.

The water filtration plant I work at now makes water that's way better then the Federal standards, but TDS is high. We are able to filter out much of what comes down the river, with a flocculant, but dissolved ions are still present. And we and lime back into the water, more to protect the piping then anything else.(Calcium will plate out).

The only complaint I have is the addition of Fluoride. Otherwise we make good potable water. Not a single violation of our permit since I've gotten here 10 years ago.

But it would seem to me that, cost being immaterial, you'd want the cleanest water you can get. There shouldn't be anything wrong with demineralized or distilled water.
 
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My Temperature is Right
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When I was in the Navy distilled water was all there was to be had. I had the duty of running the evaporator as one of my jobs. You'd think the Navy would have some idea on the benefits or health risks of drinking this over an extended period of time since they've been at it for quite some time.

I can tell you, that when chilled, it was the best tasting water I've ever had. Definitely the cleanest.

The water filtration plant I work at now makes water that's way better then the Federal standards, but TDS is high. We are able to filter out much of what comes down the river, with a flocculant, but dissolved ions are still present. And we and lime back into the water, more to protect the piping then anything else.(Calcium will plate out).

The only complaint I have is the addition of Fluoride. Otherwise we make good potable water. Not a single violation of our permit since I've gotten here 10 years ago.

But it would seem to me that, cost being immaterial, you'd want the cleanest water you can get. There shouldn't be anything wrong with demineralized or distilled water.
As much as folk whine about REMFs they have a purpose. You can guarantee that the Navy diet takes into account that those onboard ship are drinking distilled water and the menu is adjusted for it. It costs too much money to make techs to not feed them properly.
 

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Preparation job #1
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According to AMA distilled water is better for you as most minerals dissolved in water your body has to filter out and cannot be absorbed by the body. And people that drink distilled water are less likely to get kidney stones. We use solar distiller for all of our drinking and cooking water. For information on solar distillers go to http://www.solaqua.com/solaquakit2.html
 

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Rogue
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think the arguments being made against demineralized water are gaining traction with evidence more recently and thus the fact that they used to do something is not really material. They used to cook with high fat content too but that doesn't make it healthy. Nor does the fact that your consumption of any said substance without any as of yet materialized negatives constitute proof that none will materialize in the future. Osteoporosis for example is the result of a calcium deficiency that does not tend to materialize in women until after they have gone through menopause.

Additionally, from what I can tell the current findings are NOT suggesting that it is bad for you but that it is NOT AS GOOD for you. Kinda like prepackaged foods. Not poison for sure but definitely not as good for you as fresh foods made from raw materials.

Seems that certain minerals you need can come both from food and water. Those who get it only from food have significantly lower quantities then those who get it from both. And that can have long term effects on people based on the REST of their diet and possibly genetics as well.
 

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The problem to me is as less is filtered out the greater the chance of bad things staying in the water. I know that the rapid sand filters we use at work allow much to pass through. The question needs to be are some of these thing potentially dangerous and the answer is usually yes.

Hard to think that we could be arguing about water that is too clean for human consumption. Much like the thread about pasteurized water killing most of the bad bacteria yet there's got to be all sorts of nasties that could be still in it.

I know nitrates, from fertilizing fields for decades is a concern here at work. Many places seem to have problems with heavy metals, including wells. As we try to remove these we're bound to remove some beneficial substances.

So the question comes down to how clean do you want your water? What levels of contaminants are you willing to accept?
 
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off-grid organic farmer
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Distilled water is de-ionized unless you run it through a mineral bed.
I must disagree.

Distilling makes good water.

De-ionized water is completely different. De-ionized water is bad for your health.

I have drank distilled water for YEARS of my life.

I have been in villages where everyone drinks distilled water all of their life's. Old people, young people, pregnant women, everyone.

To tell this myth that somehow distilling water makes it 'bad' is a dis-service.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I've heard both sides of the argument and don't know where I stand. One of several accusations against distilled water is that without the minerals, it is essentially electrically neutral and draws electrolytes out of the body before it can be absorbed.

I had never given much thought to the tiny traces of minerals in the water having much in the way of health benefits. But when you think about it, almost every site on earth that has mineral water wells has health spas set up to utilize it.

But we also know that ships and submarines use distilled water as do many seaside towns. I'm not aware of any particular health problems associated with using it.
 

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This information is all available elsewhere - but:
Distilled water is water that has been evaporated and recollected, with some/all of its impurities staying behind. Distillation in a normal atmosphere won't de-ionize water, nor generally demineralize.
Demineralized water has been further treated (usually filtration/reaction) to remove dissoleved minerals.
Deionized water has been further treated to remove even the ions from it. This is not a very 'stable' way to keep water - exposure to atmosphere will cause the relatively quick reionization of this water. Water is a profoundly good solvent, and readily dissolves ionic compounds.

DI water is NOT what you want for consumptive stores. Your body relies on ions (usually called electrolytes) for many life-sustaining processes. DI water has a tendency to re-acquire ions, and prolonged exposure to DI water only would have the efect of scavenging those compounds from your body. Electrolyte imbalance can kill you.
It's not poison in the overt sense, but given the right circumstance it can be detrimental.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Another feature to this is that that we are discussing one facet of a multifaceted 'thing'.

We drink well water. It has iron and calcium in it.

Our goats commonly have 'urinary calculi' problems. These are stones which form from the calcium in the water. They form in a goat's bladder and may possibly clog their urethra. So it can easily be argued that our well water has too much calcium in it.

My Dw also has Osteoporosis. Her bones are losing their calcium. Which would make the argument that we need more calcium in our well water.

Both of these things are happening at the same time, from drinking the same water.

There are times when making a logical conclusion is simply too simple.

My Dw is menopausal, for her it is a hormone thing. Regardless of how much calcium she eats, her body will not absorb it. She is given drugs to change how her body absorbs calcium.

As for the goats? Well get this, which goats? It only happens to wethers. It does not happen to the nannies, it does not happen to the bucks. It only happens to males that have been neutered. Talking to vets, they have no clue of why it only effects wethers. But it does. What is the difference between the metabolism of a wether or a buck? Hormones.

Now I am not making any of this up.

Our well does have iron and calcium. My Dw does have what I have said, and our goat herds have seen this issue as well.



How does this bring light to the minerals in water debate?

Our bodies absorb minerals [or refuse to absorb minerals] as they are controlled by our hormones.

If our bodies need minerals, they will absorb it from our food or our water, as our bodies decide to do [or not].
 

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I use distilled water for long term storage, and strict emergency supply.... it will last long enough to get water 200 feet away from my home. We keep enough around for 2 days drinking supply....
 

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Another feature to this is that that we are discussing one facet of a multifaceted 'thing'.

We drink well water. It has iron and calcium in it.

Our goats commonly have 'urinary calculi' problems. These are stones which form from the calcium in the water. They form in a goat's bladder and may possibly clog their urethra. So it can easily be argued that our well water has too much calcium in it.

My Dw also has Osteoporosis. Her bones are losing their calcium. Which would make the argument that we need more calcium in our well water.

Both of these things are happening at the same time, from drinking the same water.

There are times when making a logical conclusion is simply too simple.

My Dw is menopausal, for her it is a hormone thing. Regardless of how much calcium she eats, her body will not absorb it. She is given drugs to change how her body absorbs calcium.

As for the goats? Well get this, which goats? It only happens to wethers. It does not happen to the nannies, it does not happen to the bucks. It only happens to males that have been neutered. Talking to vets, they have no clue of why it only effects wethers. But it does. What is the difference between the metabolism of a wether or a buck? Hormones.

Now I am not making any of this up.

Our well does have iron and calcium. My Dw does have what I have said, and our goat herds have seen this issue as well.



How does this bring light to the minerals in water debate?

Our bodies absorb minerals [or refuse to absorb minerals] as they are controlled by our hormones.

If our bodies need minerals, they will absorb it from our food or our water, as our bodies decide to do [or not].

It's this kind of thing that always keeps me coming back for more in terms of understanding physiology. Balances and equilibria like this are fundamental to our survival, and so wickedly complex some times that it is frankly amazing that we have survived this long as a species. So profoundly sophisticated yet so exceedingly durable. Boggles the mind.

But to the topic at hand: some people have blood chemistry (and blood volume, and dietary intakes and a billion other things) that would make depletion of something like electrolytes more difficult than others. If you're taking in more than you need, you're probably (literally) urinating most of it away. But if you were right on the cusp of say, having too little of a given electrolyte in your system but you were doing alright... imagine what would happen if you dropped your intake to 0 because you were ingesting water that had less electrolyte in it than you did. Probably not a big problem for any of us under normal circumstances, but if you were restricted for availability or didn't know what it was you had, it could turn in to a bad time.
 
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