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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to develop a detailed binder with the 12 diseases.

I know that it will depend on each families circumstances, such as Asthma suns in my family so pneumonia is a biggie for us.

So far I have:
(not in order of deadliest but most likely to happen)

1. Upper Respiratory/Pneumonia

2. Cholera

3. Malaria

4. Whooping Cough

What are other things that might make a comeback?
 

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theres a few cases of plague every year, without anti biotics its entirely possible for it to make a come back. thankfully we now know it is spread by fleas on rats. so vermin control can keep it at bay
 

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Malaria is going to be more of a tropical thing, don't see it being an issue up on the Cumberland plateau where I live. But West Nile and encephalitis a different story. Dengue fever is slowly making its way north.

Whooping cough is making a resurgence even now, since some are not doing vaccinations like they need to. It and mumps were showing up in the Amish for example.

Water borne parasites and disease I see being a big problem in post SHTF. The vast majority will be cut off from clean water sources. Once anything bottled is gone they will in desperation resort to whatever they can find, be it a creek, lake, or local pond. Most will have no real clue as to how to make an effective filter or won't boil it properly. Then your looking at Cholera as that's its usual source. I know where I live most of the ponds are in pastures, so you would have some seriously nasty parasites to deal with. The kind of thing that plagued humans for a very long time with few effective treatments.

People will flock to things like rivers or lakes as we have traditionally. It would amplify the problem. Dysentery you can flush out provided you actually have clean water to give them. Just the water issue alone I see alot of people dropping.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Learning lots of good information on Cholera:

Per mayo clinic: Type O Blood = 2x likely to get it.
(several O's in my family)

Can get it from veggies - contaminated run-off
(Thought since I have adequate means to sterilize water we would not be at risk...)

Per CDC

You can eat baby rice cereal to help stave off low-blood sugar etc...small spoonfuls at a time....(it is called the brat diet in nursing school per my 23-year-old almost RN daughter). Time to stock up on a few boxes.
 

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TB scares the crap out of me...I have given my almost RN daughter the task of researching it. It is above my pay grade. I tried but there are many layers of meds you have to take for extended periods.
 

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Malaria is going to be more of a tropical thing, don't see it being an issue up on the Cumberland plateau where I live. But West Nile and encephalitis a different story. Dengue fever is slowly making its way north.
Not really. Back in the 19th century, before modern mosquito control methods were implemented, there were cases of Malaria as far north as Minnesota. In a prolonged SHTF situation, I'd expect malaria to be common in states as far north as Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri. Maybe the Anopheles will not make it up to you in the mountains, but people between Memphis and Nashville will be at risk.
 

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Don't forget about E.Coli.

E.Coli is a direct result of the fecal contamination of warm blooded animals. Everyone has it - but certain strains that can come from cows, sheep and other animals can be deadly to humans.

I would imagine that with decreased sanitation would be an increased chance of consuming water or a vegetable contaminated with E.Coli.
 

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Diseases making a comeback--measles, tuberculosis (especially in areas with large hispanic populations) and dengue fever (along Texas' southern border and across to Florida).
 

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Not really. Back in the 19th century, before modern mosquito control methods were implemented, there were cases of Malaria as far north as Minnesota. In a prolonged SHTF situation, I'd expect malaria to be common in states as far north as Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri. Maybe the Anopheles will not make it up to you in the mountains, but people between Memphis and Nashville will be at risk.
Hence why I'm not bugging out to the South...

Seriously though, my 12 is
1.) Cholera
2.) Pneumonia
3.) Whooping cough
4.)Influenza (all of them)
5.) TB
6.) Typhoid Fever
7.) Typhus
8.) Bubonic plague
9.) AIDS/ HIV
10.) Measles
11.) Common cold
12.) Infections from wounds

The only one we won't have to worry about is obesity...
 

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Hence why I'm not bugging out to the South...

Seriously though, my 12 is
1.) Cholera
2.) Pneumonia
3.) Whooping cough
4.)Influenza (all of them)
5.) TB
6.) Typhoid Fever
7.) Typhus
8.) Bubonic plague
9.) AIDS/ HIV
10.) Measles
11.) Common cold
12.) Infections from wounds

The only one we won't have to worry about is obesity...
As I see it, some of those Dirty Dozen can be taken off due to general lack of possibility or just not deadly enough. I understand that even the tiniest of colds can kill a person in the right circumstance but lets take a closer look...

Cholera- Treatment includes eating food and drinking lots of water with with some electrolites (read salt) in it. Sure you'll be crapping in your pants:eek: but I doubt that you'll die. If you understand what you have.
Pneumonia- Has so many causes; Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, Parasites... you you might not know what is killing you. Could be the food you eat, the bag you tote, the items your carry. No vaccine=waiting to get better...
Whooping cough- Antibiotics dont work very well and usually will just limit duration slightly. Is everywhere but doesn't normally kill adults yet children are vulnerable. Epidemic status in both Pennsylvania and Washington State in April/May 2012 :confused:
TB-Common and infectious. Not easily treated. Epedemic levels declared worldwide 1993 and again in 2006.
Typhoid Fever- Usually non-fatal even without vaccine. Spreads by insects, animals, and unsanitary conditions. Lasts up to four weeks.
Typhus- Kills appx 1 person per 5 million. Can be treated with antibiotcs.
Bubonic Plague- Kills 66% within 4 days. Spread by rodents. Treated with antibotics but screwed if you don't have any...
AIDS/HIV- People with are 30-50% more susceptible to other infections. If SHTF don't go pokin' around places you don't already know...
Measles- Currently only 3/1000 cases are fatal. Number is as high as 28% in poor countries. Has 90% infection rate on those living in the same space. No specific treatment.

So taking a closer look at this list we can narrow it down to the following.

1.)Pnemonia- common and proven killer in current and past times of hardship
2.)Whooping Cough- included only if you have children will usually not kill an adult.
3.)TB- common and highly contagious
4.)Plague- Only if you will be living in a urban cess-pool or fear biological attack.
5.)Measles- high infection rate and increased cases in places with poor healthcare.
6.)AIDS/HIV- If you get it or have it you'll be very susceptible to everything else. Those with high libido's be warned! :D:
7.) Malaria- Added to list due to high likelyhood and increasing fatality at younger ages.
 

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I forgot some more:

Clostridium perfringens (Gangrene)

Campylobacter jejuni

Listeria

Legionella

Various Mycoplasma

Reminds me of my days working as a medical technologist at a hospital, I saw a LOT of these diseases on a daily basis, they are definitely out there.

I agree with the poster about E. coli, very much a potential disaster.
 
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