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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty new to the backpacking and hiking scene and I was wondering what you might put in your day pack or the pack you take with you on those trips you have no intentions of staying overnight. On any trip you must take water with you but in case of worst case scenerio do you take something small like iodine tablets or go with a full fledged filtration/purifacation system? Or, do you take your canteen and a metal cup and boil water as you find it?

How about extra clothing? I'm a snowboarder and a skier and I was thinking of packing my long johns/wool base layer for its insulating value, small size and light weight along with a fleece jacket or hoody and a poncho.

What about shelter concerns? Wal-Mart sells a one person collapsable shelter tarp thing. This would not be sufficient for backpacking but for an emergency use only it would probably work.

No doubt that I should bring my survival Knife and some method of starting fire with a tinder kit of some sort. No need to bring an ax or saw right?

What do you keep in your day pack?
 

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Here to learn
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I would have the following on a typical day hike:

On my person (in pockets):
PSK (personal survival kit)
Knife
Compass/map
Fire starter (matches or lighter or ferro rod)
whistle

In my daypack:
2 liters of water w/ nesting cup
Windproof/waterproof shell
Snack or lunch or both (depending on how long I planned to be out)
FAK (first aid kit)
Hat
Gloves
Extra socks
Wool sweater
Space blanket or heat reflective bivy sack
Bug head net

Optional:
GPS
PLB
Raincoat & rainpants (if rain is forecasted)
Bug spray
Sunscreen

Clothing system: I only wear wool or synthetics in the wilderness. My normal system is to wear synthetic quick drying cargo pants, a Smartwool t-shirt, smartwool socks, high-upper gortex/leather hiking boots, and hat/bandana, sunglasses.

Basically I try to go light but not so light that if I were injured or lost that I couldn't bivy overnight if I had to.
 

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On any trip you must take water with you but in case of worst case scenerio do you take something small like iodine tablets or go with a full fledged filtration/purifacation system? Or, do you take your canteen and a metal cup and boil water as you find it?
I don't own a filtration system, I don't like adding chemicals to my water, and I don't trust either with fully sterilizing water. I always carry a stainless steel container of some sort to heat water.

How about extra clothing? I'm a snowboarder and a skier and I was thinking of packing my long johns/wool base layer for its insulating value, small size and light weight along with a fleece jacket or hoody and a poncho.
Depends on what time of year and where you are. If it's going to get freezing cold at night, even if you don't plan to stay overnight, you better have enough to keep you warm if you ended up having to stay the night. If it may pour rain on your hike back and it's cool enough weather that this can take your heat away, then you definitely want a poncho.

What about shelter concerns? Wal-Mart sells a one person collapsable shelter tarp thing. This would not be sufficient for backpacking but for an emergency use only it would probably work.
Depends on what you need a shelter for. Here it can get cold and very rainy at night so I carry a tarp even on day hikes just in case I have to spend the night. If I was in an area with poisonous snakes/spiders/whatever, then I would be more worried about something that zips up and seals :)

No doubt that I should bring my survival Knife and some method of starting fire with a tinder kit of some sort. No need to bring an ax or saw right?
I have a folding saw that weighs very very little, so I carry it with me either way. If you would make any sort of lean-to shelter if you got lost, or if there isn't lots of wood laying about, then you wouldn't want to go without one.

I'll list what's in my kit when I get home :)
 

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Earthwalker.
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10,288 Posts
I would have the following on a typical day hike:

On my person (in pockets):
PSK (personal survival kit)
Knife
Compass/map
Fire starter (matches or lighter or ferro rod)
whistle

In my daypack:
2 liters of water w/ nesting cup
Windproof/waterproof shell
Snack or lunch or both (depending on how long I planned to be out)
FAK (first aid kit)
Hat
Gloves
Extra socks
Wool sweater
Space blanket or heat reflective bivy sack
Bug head net

Optional:
GPS
PLB
Raincoat & rainpants (if rain is forecasted)
Bug spray
Sunscreen

Clothing system: I only wear wool or synthetics in the wilderness. My normal system is to wear synthetic quick drying cargo pants, a Smartwool t-shirt, smartwool socks, high-upper gortex/leather hiking boots, and hat/bandana, sunglasses.

Basically I try to go light but not so light that if I were injured or lost that I couldn't bivy overnight if I had to.
A back up knife in your pack and maybe a folding saw would be advisable:thumb:
 

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Getting Ready
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My bag is the condor three day pack.
these items may get taken out depending on what im doing that day.

a 10x10 tarp.
personal hygiene kit (deodorant, mouthwash, condom)
first aid kit (bandaids, neosporin, condom)
mora knife
headlamp
mag lite
water tabs
camelback .75l water bottle.
sometimes a 2l bladder.
extra batteries
socks
gloves
hat
beanie
emergency blanket
compass
local map (the currant one is all of norcal, but I also use the bay area specific one too, or the whole california one.)
fire starting kit
esbit stove
para cord 50'
bandana
pen, paper

I usually dont carry much in the way of clothes.
Im also thinking of adding a Brunton Solo 3.4 for some extra power.

T
 

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Survivus most anythingus
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3,874 Posts
I'm pretty new to the backpacking and hiking scene and I was wondering what you might put in your day pack or the pack you take with you on those trips you have no intentions of staying overnight.
Even though you might not plan on staying overnight, plan on twisting your ankle or suffering a minor injury like that, or even getting sidetracked and losing time and light and having to bed down for the night. Plan on it, that way if it happens, you are prepared for it.

I would think that the two person Emergency Bivy from Adventure Medical Kits (AMK) and one of the Heat Sheets (AMK) would serve you well in an emergency.

On any trip you must take water with you but in case of worst case scenerio do you take something small like iodine tablets or go with a full fledged filtration/purifacation system? Or, do you take your canteen and a metal cup and boil water as you find it?
Iodine - Potable Aqua are fine. Katadyn MicroPur tablets are fine. Having a stainless steel Nalgene or Kleen Kanteen to boil water in directly is excellent. A nesting stainless steel cup or USGI canteen cup or one from Snow Peak or other manufacturers, all excellent my friend. You don't have to have the filtration systems with you, the chemical pills and a way to boil water will suffice but the Katadyn Hiker Model Filtration System works excellent.

If I am just going out in the woods, as you described, I generally carry a Seychelle Filtration Straw and a Seychelle Filtration Canteen along with Katadyn MicroPur Tablets. I always have a stainless steel cup if I have a backpack on.

How about extra clothing? I'm a snowboarder and a skier and I was thinking of packing my long johns/wool base layer for its insulating value, small size and light weight along with a fleece jacket or hoody and a poncho.
Your clothing is your first line shelter. Take whatever is appropriate to the season with an edge towards unexpected cold snaps as well.

What about shelter concerns? Wal-Mart sells a one person collapsable shelter tarp thing. This would not be sufficient for backpacking but for an emergency use only it would probably work.
Most of the stuff at Wal-Mart is Ozark Trails, their brand of outdoor gear, and the vast majority of it, I would not trust my life to it.

The AMK Emergency Bivy and Heat Sheets up above will serve you well. If you need a tarp, Bushcraft USA has some excellent tarps and the emergency/survival kit model is about $22.00 and it looks to be an awesome deal.

Steer clear of China-Mart, you get what you pay for. I purchase cottonballs and steel wool and other things like that there, but for something like a shelter? Forget that.

No doubt that I should bring my survival Knife and some method of starting fire with a tinder kit of some sort. No need to bring an ax or saw right?

What do you keep in your day pack?
A Bahco Laplander Folding Saw takes up little room and doesn't weigh much, I would definitely have one of them in the pack.

I don't know what you have for a survival knife, but a good fixed blade like those made by ESEE Cutlery (Formerly RAT Cutlery) more than fit the bill.

I'll make another post in a moment.
 

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Maximus
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12,320 Posts
I'm pretty new to the backpacking and hiking scene and I was wondering what you might put in your day pack or the pack you take with you on those trips you have no intentions of staying overnight....

What do you keep in your day pack?
On day hikes, what kills people the most is exposure and hypothermia. So that is what I usually take precautions against.

  • A lighter
  • folding knife
  • extra clothes
  • hat
  • metal canteen/ bottle
  • Map
  • Compass
  • Cell phone
  • food/snacks
  • paracord

For a short situation, I would boil water or use a chemical treatment. Maybe an emergency blanket and a whistle if you can't do it loudly.
 

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Survivus most anythingus
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3,874 Posts
In this thread, I have my home made tinder tube rig. Well, I didn't make the tube, but the concoction is mine. :D:

Take a look: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=181512

I think a DOAN's Magnesium Firestarter and a Light My Fire (LMF) Brand "Fire Steel," which is a ferrocerium rod and striker, along with obtaining one of those "tubes" and the tinder I advised...they're just must-have items for going out in the woods.
 

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Survivus most anythingus
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This should be one of the YouTube videos I was referring to. It's Bushcraft Outfitters tarp.


I have no idea about the imbed code!

 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good stuff so far, thank you to everyone who has responded.
I get the sense from some that for the short day trips a boiling mechanism is a good way to go. I have a Swiss Volcano stove/canteen system (http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/WX130-1.html) that I think I'll put in the day pack along with a 2 liter camel pack and the iodine tablets.

I also forgot to mention that I always carry a whistle and compass on a neckless when I go in the mountains. I plan on taking my Leatherman Wave with me (I can't find it right now:mad:), a folding utility knife and a cell phone in my pockets.

Would a painters plastic drop cloth/tarp work well for a makeshift shelter?

Thanks again for all the help, keep it coming.
 

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Alright, this is everything I carry pretty much all the time, though I may take some items out if I'm sure I won't need them. I also add a few things in for multi-day hikes (a proper tent, a blanket or sleeping bag, etc)

Critical items that will never leave my bag:

- Knife
- Bear spray
- Fire making kit (some tinder and a couple methods to make fire)
- Compass
- Basic first aid with emergency blanket/poncho
- Bottle + Stainless steel container to heat water/food

Important items I will almost never leave out:

- Multitool
- Folding saw
- Fishing hooks/line/weights/buoy/fake bait
- Hatchet
- Pots w/ very basic rations (oatmeal, popcorn, lentils, noodles)
- Paracord + figure eight / carabiner
- Tarp
- Wind-up Flashlight
- Candle

Not so critical items:

- Titanium spork
- Toilet paper
- Snare wire (thin aircraft cable)
- Bear banger (sounds like a gun firing)
- Mosquito net
- Zap straps
- Filet knife
- Arrowhead
- Camera
 

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Survivus most anythingus
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Good stuff so far, thank you to everyone who has responded.
You're welcome. :cool:

Would a painters plastic drop cloth/tarp work well for a makeshift shelter?

Thanks again for all the help, keep it coming.
Is it waterproof? If so, yes! If not...no.

Is it heavy? Are you going to leave it behind because you don't want to hump it like you did "last time and never used it?"

Check the video out. $22.00 for an emergency survival tarp that is designed as such is a steal and the thing folds up very, very small for the protection it provides.
 

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On my person:

- hat, wallet, deet, watch, cell phone, knife, lighter, handkerchief Bandanna), whistle.

in my bag:

survival kit in a can consisting of:

- bag containing cotton balls dipped in petroleum jelly with survival matches.
- space blanket
- knife
- fire starter steel
- orange plastic bag
- small fishing kit, line wrapped around a pencil
- notepad with needle and safety pins on cover
- led flashlight with spare battery
- plasters and iodine tablets candy high energy bar elastoplast and dental floss
- bandanna
- money and change
- paracord

tin is wrapped with duct tape.

clothes:

wool hat, gloves, socks
poncho
polartec jacket

first aid kit

food

2 water bottles
 

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Kibitzer
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Another guy posted his pack list for a "day" hike and everyone told him to get rid of his flashlights.
What happens at the end of the day? It gets dark.
If you're on a unfamiliar trail, you might be late getting back, in the dark.
Even a little Nano light is bright in the dark.
Got one in my PSK.
 

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217 Posts
Another guy posted his pack list for a "day" hike and everyone told him to get rid of his flashlights.
What happens at the end of the day? It gets dark.
If you're on a unfamiliar trail, you might be late getting back, in the dark.
Even a little Nano light is bright in the dark.
Got one in my PSK.
I should go back and edit my post because I realized I have a few small things tucked into various pockets. One of them is a flashlight.

A few survivalists disagree with bringing a flashlight when you have minimal gear for a few reasons. One being that you should have light from a fire, and another is that you're relying on things that may fail (lightbulb, battery, etc).

I completely disagree with these people :)

Your fire may go out. You may think you're walking back as it's getting dark only to find that you're lost but now it's already dark. Perhaps you will find a cave for shelter. Good luck finding dry tinder and wood in the dark in order to start your fire to get that light.
 

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Not many places in the lower 48 that require long johns and fleece in August. Save them for a couple months from now.

Compass & map
First aid kit.
Couple of ways to make fire.
Hydration bladder
Some portable aqua tablets or a pocket filter.
Space blanket (or bag)
Extra large trash bag
Whistle & LED Head lamp
T.P.
Knife
Paracord.
Snacks
Wind breaker
In some areas (not many) maybe bear spray.


The most important items in your ensemble aren't in your pack. They are on your body and in your head. I like pants with zip off legs and shirts with sleeves that roll up easily. A head covering is the most important piece of gear you have. Shoes and socks are a close second. More important than that even is knowledge. Know where the water is. Know the climate, know the terrain, know the flora and the fauna. Letting someone reliable know your plans and when to expect you back will usually save your butt in a crisis, even if you do everything else wrong.

This is probably still overdoing it. You're already dressed for comfort for the day. You just need to extend your temperature range for night and allow for precipitation. If you can't survive a night in the woods with this list, you're not ready for a solo day hike outside a city park.
 

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I drive a compact car
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On any trip you must take water with you but in case of worst case scenerio do you take something small like iodine tablets or go with a full fledged filtration/purifacation system?
On a day hike, iodine tablets. A filter is too heavy and bulky for just one day imo.

How about extra clothing?
Just extra socks and a poncho during the warmer months.

What about shelter concerns?
Go with what's been recommended above.

No need to bring an ax or saw right?
I don't. If I'm camping, sure.
 

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Historian & Archaeologist
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1,535 Posts
you guys carry all that on just a day hike? like less than 15 miles? i mean i know we all like to prepare, but all i take on a day hike (a couple of hours) is:

msr 3 liter camelback
a small snack
my gerber hatchet/knife combo
my EDC (wallet, firearm, firestarter)
IFAK

too much weight ruins a good hike imo.
 

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Renaissance Man
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7,503 Posts
you guys carry all that on just a day hike? like less than 15 miles? i mean i know we all like to prepare, but all i take on a day hike (a couple of hours) is:

msr 3 liter camelback
a small snack
my gerber hatchet/knife combo
my EDC (wallet, firearm, firestarter)
IFAK

too much weight ruins a good hike imo.
You carry a hatchet but no tp or raincoat/windbreaker? :upsidedown:

Az
 

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Founder
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Just take the poncho out, and you should be ready to go.


Rain poncho
gps, topo map, compass
meal or snack
bug spray
32 ounce water bottle
water filter
 
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