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Adventurer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The nature is beautiful and it's perfect, because humans have not managed to destroy it yet.

Watching and observing wildlife can be very fascinating and "amusing" in some sort of way. Seeing predators seeking their prey, watching them stealthily and curiously. That's where the real action begins!

However, it might be different when you are getting caught in the middle of it. It's not so fun when you realize that someone is chasing you and your life is in danger. Then it's the time to run and hide or defend yourself. Depends on the situation and the animal.

Have you ever had to defend yourself in the wild? If you had, did you know how to do it or you just improvised?

Memories carried me away a bit.
 

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Just fed up.
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970 Posts
Yes. Whilst camping on a remote beach in Northern Greece, I was attacked by a pack of feral dogs. Fortunately, I had the means to defend myself. (Cold Steel Sjambok & Bushman on a stick.) Ended up killing the large alpha male dog & wounding one other. Don't ever want to repeat that night & it gave me the heeby jeebies for the rest of my trip!
Not really in the wild, but it still scared the **** out of me!
 

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accipere rubrum pilula
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1,680 Posts
Same with me, concerning feral dogs, back on the late 70's. A buddy of mine went on a backpacking trip with me, up in Upper Michigans copper country.

We were hiking far out in the back country, and we noticed a couple dogs off and on shadowing us. We kept an eye out, but didn't think much about it.

When we pitched camp everything was quiet and no dogs were around as far as we knew. We made a quick dinner and as we were eating, five mangy dogs came into the camp.

Three of the dogs made it real clear that they were going to get our dinner. Luckily my buddy had his Ruger .22 on his belt, (my pistol was in the tent) and he gave one of the dogs a .22 sleeping pill, which sent the other four scattering.

We slept light that night, but for the rest of trip, we didn't see any more dogs for the next four days.

After that experience, I always kept my pistol handy.
 

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10,726 Posts
I have been around bears a lot. I have had two of them in my rifle sights with the safety off. Once I was sniffed by a sow and two cubs through mosquito netting from 16 inches while lying in a tent. I had one on his hind legs at night on the other side of a picnic table.

I have run into some teenage target shooters that we were really stupid. I took cover behind a log and pointed a loaded rifle at them and told them to quit shooting or I would return fire.

I have had two drunks eyeballing my new wife a long way from anywhere and no one around.
 

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reluctant sinner
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20,162 Posts
I was about 15 on a 5 day camping trip with a buddy. His dog wondered off while we were hunting grouse. We hear the dog barking off in the distance - then he comes running back with a big black bear on his ass. I'm pressing the magazine cartridge release in the 37 Ithaca dumping 2 rounds of bird shot on the ground, then putting in 2 rounds of OO into the magazine, cycle the action and insert the 3rd OO. The bear broke off the charge at about 50 yards. At 40 I would have started shooting.

A couple days later the dog got the crap beat out of him by a turkey. After than lesson he started staying closer.
 

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Feral dogs between 29 palms and old women springs.
Some drunk was smacking around his girlfriend in a campground in Victorville ( god I hate California ) and she decided to run and she ran straight in to our site ( guess it isn't really wild ) and ex-1 adopted her.

Both were improvised but had been thought gamed previously.

What's the saying " no plan survives first contact with the enemy."
 

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Only from a very friendly chipmunk who was determined he wanted to share my dinner. No other encounters, although there could have been if it hadn't been for warnings from my dog re. a bull moose in very close proximity to the trail (ie right next to it) that I hadn't seen.
An over zealous humming bird who kept striking my bright red cap while fly fishing on the Gros Ventre above Jackson. Actually a cool experience. Other than my eyes (I was wearing sunglasses) I wasn't too worried about injuries.
 

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Professional Geologist.
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1,794 Posts
I was once charged by a mountain lion. Fortunately I saw it just before it exploded out of the brush and I was able to get my mountain bike (I was fixing a flat tire) between myself and the cat before it got to me.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=3805077&highlight=idaho#post3805077

This is why I never, ever go mountain biking, hiking, trekking, camping, etc. without my 10mm strapped to my hip, anymore.
 

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"Everbody has a plan . .&quot
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2,187 Posts
Scariest encounter I ever had with a wild creature was a racoon on the third floor of a hotel in Gatlinburg Tenn LOL.
He was digging in a trashcan beside the elevator & didn't appreciate the interuption.
Trust me, they don't call them WILD animals for nothing ! ! ! Sucker probably weighed 10 lbs & he backed me down snarling & hissing ! ! !
We took the stairs, LOL, & left him to his dinner . . .
 

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Outlander Territory
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3,710 Posts
An over zealous humming bird who kept striking my bright red cap while fly fishing on the Gros Ventre above Jackson. Actually a cool experience. Other than my eyes (I was wearing sunglasses) I wasn't too worried about injuries.
Seen and had that happen a lot. Hummingbirds LOVE red. Unless your eyes were red from a hangover, I think they were pretty safe...lol :thumb:
 

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Happy to be here!
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I was walking my dog in the park when we came upon a raccoon. At first I was like, "Oh cool, a wild animal out in the middle of the day." The **** walked in three tight circles and then kind of slow wobble/charged my dog and I from about 50 feet away. At that point it was clear the **** was acting very wrong. Thank God my German shepherd was on the leash, but I was actually having to drag the dog in the opposite direction because she wanted to attack the ****. I stopped and picked up the dog and was trying to flee, but wasn't fast enough carrying the full size dog. I was losing ground to the ****. I made the choice to drop the dog, stop and make a stand. I drew my Baretta 21A and proceeded to methodically empty the gun into the lumbering ****. The **** prevailed through a few direct hits, but then went down and succumb. I later returned with a shovel and some rubber gloves, burying the thing as deep as I could go. It was kind of a SSS situation.
 

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Here is a strange one. My brother checked into a motel in Africa after many weeks on the road. He took a shower and came out with a towel to find a small troop of baboons in the room with him. They opened the door and let themselves in and they had already eaten all the food in his pack. It was touch a go for about 10 minutes before they left. There were two large males in the group. Now he locks the door before taking a shower.

He also tells the story of going to see the Mountain Gorillas in Rwanda. By law you have to go with a guide. The regular guides cost several hundred dollars to take a group. They found a $50 guide who lead them down the trail. All at once he stopped and pulled out his machete and whfft. He cut the head off a 7 foot black mamba. It took them a couple of hours to find the gorillas, but they ended up in a whole troop. They were instructed to remain quiet, avoid eye contact and never to run no matter what happens. A girl from France ran away at first contact. They spent about 30 minutes with the gorillas some within 4 feet. The male silverback came through to check on the humans. He did not bother them, but they left soon afterward.
 

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I was walking my dog in the park when we came upon a raccoon. At first I was like, "Oh cool, a wild animal out in the middle of the day." The **** walked in three tight circles and then kind of slow wobble/charged my dog and I from about 50 feet away. At that point it was clear the **** was acting very wrong. Thank God my German shepherd was on the leash, but I was actually having to drag the dog in the opposite direction because she wanted to attack the ****. I stopped and picked up the dog and was trying to flee, but wasn't fast enough carrying the full size dog. I was losing ground to the ****. I made the choice to drop the dog, stop and make a stand. I drew my Baretta 21A and proceeded to methodically empty the gun into the lumbering ****. The **** prevailed through a few direct hits, but then went down and succumb. I later returned with a shovel and some rubber gloves, burying the thing as deep as I could go. It was kind of a SSS situation.
Almost the exact same story but I was 14 and in the woods with my buddy and a border collie. Instead of a 21a I had a ruger single 6 and a sharpened stick/spear.

After that day anytime I went in the woods I always had a spear/walking stick of some sort. Because it's hard to hit a rabid **** when you are scared witless and need to reload a revolver with loose shells in your pocket, the spear was indispensable.

I can not even fathom having to fight a larger animal like a bear or mountain lion or large breed dog, that rabies is like fighting a zombie
 

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Not in the wilds, but in the city. Loose pit bulls in alleys where our crews were picking up trash, I was a "refuse supervisor". Prohibited from carrying a gun per "work rules" but work truck was equipped, with steel rake, shovel, axe and pitchfork. A pitchfork is a most effective standoff weapon for vicious dogs until you can get back into the truck. If you can skewer the alpha dog and get him into the hopper of the trash truck and compact him into the load the other dogs will just whine and wander off. By the time the truck got to the landfill to dump its load alpha dog had no more fight left in him...

Animal control issued our guys bear spray later, but most crews preferred the pitchfork and the dogs learned to fear it, all you had to do was get it out and walk towards them and they would scatter...
 

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Indefatigable
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I had a run-in with a wild hog in AR. I went to take out my MILs trash for her. She reminded me about bears as I took the keys to the container and walked out the door.
It was late, I wasn't in the most alert state and no, I wasn't armed (STUPID) I was so worried about bears I didn't even notice the hog until he was between me and the back door. I did however have my siren key fob in my pocket. That did the trick, I got lucky, he took off. I never went out that backdoor unarmed again.
I can appreciate the stories about ***** here. I can't say I was attacked by one, I think he accidentally fell out of the tree on me. I'm not sure who was more freaked out, we both ran in opposite directions.
 

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Forward, into the fray!
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3,682 Posts
Canadian Jays, a medium-sized bird sometimes called a Camp Robber, live in most of the Rocky Mountains. They can get pretty pushy. They'll land on your picnic table and argue with children for their food. Not often with adults. Size matters.

Once stood and watched, trying not to roll around laughing, while my 2 1/2 yr old son defended his dinner from a couple of them. He was determined to not be robbed of his mac-n-cheese, they were determined not to be bested by a 25 pound kid with a fork.

Don't know why he never called for help. Most kids would squeal for Mommy right away but he just stood up on the bench and growled and swatted with that fork imitating the ancient Vikings he's descended from.

When compatriots of the birds arrived to help their fellows I decided it was time to come to the rescue and shooed them away. Tiny son cheered and acted like we had won a major war. He even gathered a bag of pine cones for artillery for later engagements.
 
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