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So I had a squib that was sitting right at the end of a 6” barrel. I tried 2 wooden dowels and an aluminum rod for HOURS… No luck.

So because it was at the tip of the bore I decided to drill a 1/4 inch hole right through the middle of the bullet, collapse the bullet in on itself a little and viola, it came right out….. BUT it would seem my drill bit grazed a spot inside the barrel (about 1 inch deep from the bore) and left some ugly horizontal scratches…. I included a picture for everyone.

How badly will this effect accuracy? Do I need to buy a new barrel? Should I run a bunch of solid copper Ammo through it to try and smooth them out?
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You won't know until you shoot it. If it was at the muzzle I'd be worried about it but down the bore you just don't know until it's tested.
Surprisingly often bugered up bores shoot very well, muzzle imperfections are almost always problems.
Yeah, if it was at muzzle I would be more concerned. I have an AR-15 that has marred rifling near gas port. It still is a great shooting rifle.
 
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You spent HOURS?!?!?
I've cleared rifles and handguns...never took more than 5 minutes, even when stuck at the throat of a 20" rifle.
No way it doesn't come out with dowels.
My guess is, you were afraid to hit the dowel, or the dowel was too thin.

The aluminum rod though...yeah, that was a waste of time.


Just for those that are looking at this...to clear a bullet from the bore, use SHORT wooden dowels that are as close to bore size as possible. A little friction is actually OK.
For a 6" barrel with a bullet in the last inch near the muzzle, I'd use two 2" dowels in the barrel, and a 3-4" dowel that extends out the rear, to beat on.
Then, don't be afraid to beat them like a rented mule. They shouldn't, but it is OK of they crack, you can just remove them.


Good lesson on why it is necessary to have and use the correct tools to remove lodged bullets. OP I hope has learned his lesson and will get a proper squib rod from Brownell's.
It's NOT necessary, at all. They are just brass rods. I've never used anything but wooden dowels, and never had a problem.
 

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Bought a single action that a cowboy shooter had stuck 5-148gr wadcutters in the bore. Made a spade bit out of brass hardened, drilled the bullets and knocked them out with a brass rod.
Hope all works out for you.
 

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I read far more threads than I post to. I've found myself agreeing wholeheartedly with a lot of ajole's posts lately. I've only had to drive a couple of squibs out myself, but I second the wooden dowel as big as you can get and it slide into the bore. Try to get hardwood dowels though, and like ajole said, don't be afraid to get aggressive with driving it out. What you don't want is steel on steel contact.
That being said for this example, what's done is done. Shoot it, enjoy it, and don't worry about it.
 

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Vigilant Curmudgeon
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For me , If the barrel got dinged, gouged,& scraped , & the damage done to it ; 🔫. would become just one of the loaded house guns.
Almost assuredly the accuracy will have diminished. So … house gun for the basement. Dry fire the hell out of it .
 

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I'd like to add one more suggestion. If that bullet was stuck that hard in the bore, you might want to check the ammo. Was it a factory load? Was it lead or jacketed? Is it the right ammo for this firearm, and if so maybe you should check the bullet diameters on a few with some calipers.
Basic question is why did it fail to exit the barrel of its own power?

I've had two squibs. One on a cap and ball revolver. That one was my fault in that I had left a lot of oil in the cylinder and it contaminated my powder on the load. The other was a revolver using some factory 32 ACP loads (yes you are reading that correctly). The first one sounded a little anemic. The second shot was even worse. I stopped shooting and found the bullet lodged in the barrel (the wooden dowel and hammer had it out quickly). I chalked that up to bad factory loads and I never buy that brand now.

Edit: The bullet being that stuck, sounds like it was a very tight fit trying to run down the bore. Maybe not a low power charge.
 

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use a little Kroil in the bore to ease the friction factor.

The hardwood dowell is by far the best advice.

Do not use anything like a screwdriver blade or punch that can cause the bullet to deform and expand outward gripping the bore tighter.

Above all, eliminate the cause of the squib. Only had one squib during six decades of shooting and that was due to a low charge of Bulleseye powder firing a lead wadctter. Low charges of fast-burning powder in large cases is asking for trouble, you can generate squibs or even a possible explosion…published literature bears this out.
 

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I agree with Outpost75, get the right tools for the job. A wooden dowel isnt it. If thats what youre using, and got away with it so far, youve been lucky. If you doubt that, ask a gunsmith. ;)

A proper-sized brass rod is your best bet. A good vise with proper jaws is pretty much a must too. Also, if its a revolver, remove the cylinder before you start pounding.

Lead bullets are the easiest, plated and jacketed are more of a bitch. Be prepared to wail on it too, especially if its not lead. If its a revolver, hope its close to the forcing cone. If its an auto, hope its close to either end.
 
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What hell, pay attention
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I guess everyone has their way of doing things.

The couple of gunsmiths I know, who have done it for a living for quite a few decades, said thats about the worst thing to use, and if the dowel splinters/shatters, it will more likely make things worse.

The few times Ive needed it, brass has always worked well for me.
 

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Especially when trying to remove a lodged, jacketed bullet, flood the bore with ATF or penetrating oil. Let sit until the oil migrates past the lodged bullet to reduce its adhesion. Then use solid brass rod about 0.002 less than bore diameter and give it a good smack with 1 - pound lead, dead blow hammer. It should then move so can be pushed out easily. Use extreme caution if tracer or incendiary bullet and wear full face shield, gloves and eye protection!
 

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That’s good advice about removing the cylinder first (common sense hopefully).
Easily done with a SA. Revolver.
But, if you are a novice “gun fiddler” and have a swing-out cylinder in a double-action revolver, the repetitive pounding with the cylinder hanging open can damage the cylinder crane and cylinder fit in several areas. Removing and reinstalling a swing-out cylinder on some models of revolvers is not a procedure for the average gun tinkerer.
if you cannot remove the cylinder easily, at least bind it up to prevent the impact blows from hammering it needlessly. A bent cylinder crane or galled bearing surface is far worse than a stuck squib….I know!
 
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