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Just bought a Crosman 1322 .22 caliber pellet pistol and have it sighted in dead on at 20 yards. My question is has anyone here used one on game (squirrels, rabbits, grouse, etc.) and how well did it do on impact? I grew up using and still have a 1377 .177 caliber I used on game and did reasonably well but it had higher velocity, as opposed to slower, heavier pellet. Thoughts and actual usage accounts? Thanks!
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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I have killed small birds with a low velocity pistol, but nothing larger. I would think that you’d want about 1000fps, and that would require a rifle.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I have a 130 pump up 22 pistol that I tuned up. My 140 rifle would shoot threw one side of galvinized garbage can (I also tuned it up). You should get a spare seal and pump cup.

Wind resistance is a cubic function, the faster you go the much harder it gets to fight.
Energy is a function of the square of the velocity , light bullets going fast can have more paper energy than a slow big bullet. I think the heavy pellet is more effective.

I like the CCI CB Long, in a rifle they are way quieter than my pellet gun.
 

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ive got an benjamin hb22, that i keep it in my b o b , for small game, i also have a AR 7, but hears the reason i carry both, i f im in the wood i would use the 22 rifle most of the time, but it im forced to hunt in the city, i know that to little 14 gr pellet at 460 fps, is only going to travel so far, so if i miss my target, the chances of hurting someone in that envirment is lessend, and while not as quite as cb caps in a rifle, it,s still pretty quite, also most 22 ammo has 40 gr bullets and if we add the waight of the case and powder, ill bet were looking at say 70gr waight, total, that,s the waight of 5 pellets, now this dosen,t off set the extra waight of the gun, but for the waight of 200 22lr.s ( still not much waight )you can carry 1000 22 pellets, so i would never give up my 22lr as a primary forging tool, but i do thank that a small 22 pellet pistol dose have a place in a bug out bag
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a 130 pump up 22 pistol that I tuned up. My 140 rifle would shoot threw one side of galvinized garbage can (I also tuned it up). You should get a spare seal and pump cup.

Wind resistance is a cubic function, the faster you go the much harder it gets to fight.
Energy is a function of the square of the velocity , light bullets going fast can have more paper energy than a slow big bullet. I think the heavy pellet is more effective.

I like the CCI CB Long, in a rifle they are way quieter than my pellet gun.

How did you tune it up?
 

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reluctant sinner
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It has been like 20 years since I rebuilt any airguns. Did a couple 100 Crossman, Ben's and Sheridians.

I had like a shoe box of parts to choose from so I just picked ones the fit on the tighter side. The trick was to undersize the nipple on a lathe and the make a bushing to oversize it so to would fit the cap very tightly. I think it would hold 50 pumps, regular parts will blow the cap seal anywhere past about 12 pumps.
 

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Just bought a Crosman 1322 .22 caliber pellet pistol and have it sighted in dead on at 20 yards. My question is has anyone here used one on game (squirrels, rabbits, grouse, etc.) and how well did it do on impact? I grew up using and still have a 1377 .177 caliber I used on game and did reasonably well but it had higher velocity, as opposed to slower, heavier pellet. Thoughts and actual usage accounts? Thanks!
I had a 1377 when I was a kid, I bought another one a few years ago and put the buttstock on it, great little critter killer. I liked the older versions as the bolt was magnetic and could also shoot BBs, the newer version only takes pellets now, that is the only negative about the newer version.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had a 1377 when I was a kid, I bought another one a few years ago and put the buttstock on it, great little critter killer. I liked the older versions as the bolt was magnetic and could also shoot BBs, the newer version only takes pellets now, that is the only negative about the newer version.
My original one I shot the barrel rifling ou with steel bb's and finally killed the seal. I do miss he bb option...
 

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Always Gunnin
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Just bought a Crosman 1322 .22 caliber pellet pistol and have it sighted in dead on at 20 yards. My question is has anyone here used one on game (squirrels, rabbits, grouse, etc.) and how well did it do on impact? I grew up using and still have a 1377 .177 caliber I used on game and did reasonably well but it had higher velocity, as opposed to slower, heavier pellet. Thoughts and actual usage accounts? Thanks!
How man feet per second is this pistol? I think in the pellet gun world bigger slower pellets equal more effective kills. For example according to Benjamin (I know this may not be actual) the trail NPXL .177 is 1500 fps with 25 ft lbs, the npxl .22 is 1100 fps with 28 ft lbs and the npxl .25 is 750 fps and 30 ft lbs. So in these instances slower velocities actually give you more ft lbs which is what matters with pellets. IMO

I have a Ruger air magnum that is 1400 fps and 24 ft lbs and doesn't kill near as clean as my Benjamin NPXL 1100. As far as the pistols go I have no experience, but imagine the results are probably close to the same.
 

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The 1322 shoots a 22 cal. pellet at about 440 fps. It is going to be very marginal for anything other than smaller birds or point blank range on something the size of a chipmunk or small ground squirrel. Most guys on the airgun forums consider something in the range of 800 - 900 fps needed for squirrel sized animals.
 

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The 1322 shoots a 22 cal. pellet at about 440 fps. It is going to be very marginal for anything other than smaller birds or point blank range on something the size of a chipmunk or small ground squirrel. Most guys on the airgun forums consider something in the range of 800 - 900 fps needed for squirrel sized animals.
You can double that to 12 ft-lbs with some valve work, a flat top piston and stiffer hammer spring.
Mine gets 630 ft/s with 20 pumps, 520 at 10 pumps.
12ft-lbs is plenty for small game. Just ask the brits, they are capped at 12ft-lb and do plenty of airgun hunting.

At 2lb the 1322 would make a great packing airgun. Self contained and doesn't weigh 8lbs like a spring-piston.
 

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Yup, 12ft/lb will do for small game, 6 will work for birds close range, squirrels are hard as nails so you need ideally 12ft/lb out to 25-30 yards but shot placement is more important with squirrels, unless you hit them in the head they will run. Either behind the eye or on the top of the head seems very effective, don't know why just seems to dump more energy.
 

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Just bought a Crosman 1322 .22 caliber pellet pistol and have it sighted in dead on at 20 yards. My question is has anyone here used one on game (squirrels, rabbits, grouse, etc.) and how well did it do on impact? I grew up using and still have a 1377 .177 caliber I used on game and did reasonably well but it had higher velocity, as opposed to slower, heavier pellet. Thoughts and actual usage accounts? Thanks!
i have used my 1322 to shoot squirrels dead with no issues what so ever.
 

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Crosman .22 for what?

What a bunch of crap. Do you really believe that a $50.00 made in China Walmart air pistol is going to help you eat? Seriously? Have you ever hunted with an air rifle? They have this formula called foot pounds of energy (FPE). The minimum for hunting small game is 12 FPE. Pump rifles like the the Benjamin 392 (.22) can reach that level. Most spring rifles in .22 reach that level. Most 177 air rifles do not reach that level. Yea, a lot of the .177 spring guns say 1000 FPS or 1200 FPS, but they are using super lite pellets that will not be accurate, and they won't have any energy. Using something like a 7.9 grain .177 cal. pellet brings heir speed down, and their FPE is well below the suggested 12 FPE. Still, a .177 spring rifle is miles ahead of the Crosman pump pistols in .22 or .177. Hitting something accurately at 20-40 yards is one thing, but having some "smack" behind the pellet at that range is the trick. Even at very close range, the little Crosman pistols don't have the smack in .22 or .177. Rabbits are pretty easy to kill with a head shot, but squarrels are much harder to kill (I don't know why). Regardless, I know guys buy the steel upper receiver's for their Crosmans so they can mount scopes or dots. They have cool looking shoulder stocks that fit in backpacks, and they have tricks and tips to boost the speed of the pellet. They put longer barrels on them too. Lots of Mods. But, at the end of the day, they still don't have enough smack to kill a rabbit. The poor critters will always run off with an injury, and you will not have a follow-up shot to miss with. Why guys buy these cheap pistols, and then spend money turning them into rifles (under-powered) I'll never understand it. If you really want to understand why these pistols won't work for hunting, you should spend some time actually hunting with an air rifle. With a good .22 springer, and multi-aiming point scope (MAP) scopes, you can take game at 50 yards. I have a Daisy 853 rifle that shoots .177 in the mid-400s. It's a 10 meter match rifle, and I shoot insects with it for fun. I would not shoot a rabbit with it, even up close, because it does not have enough power behind it. My Daisy is a fun gun. The Crosman air pistols are fun guns, and unless you plan on eating insects, they are way, way too under-powered to hunt with. Those Crosman pistols are good for a fun day of shooting in the back yard. That is the truth, being told to you by a guy that hunts small game with air rifles. Believe it or not.
 
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