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I had all but given up on Dual Survival when Cody left the show and the new guy Matt came on board. Like every other show( except maybe Les Stroud) they have staged situations and lets not forget the camera crews. That being said, it seems the new guy Matt has been doing this so long, he builds "decked out" shelters and creature comfort items as easily and as fast as it takes most of us to create the basic, bare minimum, bare bones shelters. His philosophy seems to be "If we have to be in the woods, we don't have to suffer and live like animals"

Spending any amount of time in one place, he'll build chairs to relax, tables to rest your drinks on, forks, spoons, grills that turn, over head fans flapping and keeping you cool, etc, etc. The point I'm making is does survival mean uncomfortable and crude?

Back when I use to fish 3-4 times a week, while waiting for the fish to bite I constructed a lean-to when it rained. Over time, I replaced the log with a chair and a then more chairs my buddies could take down to the lake edge, then a table to play cards, shelves and hooks for our stuff. Over the course of a few seasons it became very comfortable. It didn't help us catch many fish but it made it more comfortable to do and enjoy.

Anyone else become good at creature comforts building?
 

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Skills like that are a reflection of your dirt time. If you watch a video on how to do something, or try it on your own one time, you aren't going to be proficient at doing it at a moments notice in any given environment. But if you have experience doing this over a long period of time then it is like second nature to start constructing these things.
 

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I did that for years with the Scouts. The fancier I could make my tent forced all the boys to start learning how to lash, mortise and tenon with a knife, axe and bowsaw, and generally care more about their surroundings. I would make a table, chair, backpack rest, cot supports, name board and mailbox. Oh, and a weather rock.
 

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I don’t consider them creature comforts. It’s being proactive and constantly improving your position. I know there is a balance of energy loss, caloric intake and necessary activity, but you must keep your mind working and continually make improvements to any situation you’re in; complacency kills faster than anything else in this world. I will give Matt Graham credit as he plans for the long-haul in every situation. I know he’s looking at those five-meter targets all the time, but he still has the ability to look out and plan for longer range targets.

Experience helps with the balance. You don’t want to waste energy on frivolous or useless activities; however, with practice you’re efficiency to improve your situation becomes much more effective with that expenditure of energy. Some may think he goes overboard, I prefer planned action over indecisive “conservation” any day!

ROCK6
 

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What are we talking about here? Mainly just various examples of wood crafting. There's a guy who does awesome chairs and shelters with rope, but you need a ton of rope. If you have lots of stones sometimes you can make various structures or implements with those.

I think that the weaving techniques the girls on these shows often do is pretty cool. Making visors and hats and whatnot. Baskets and containers are also very useful. I'm not very well versed in any of these skills unfortunately, but I have the rest of my life to learn them. Leaves me something to do.
 

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Anyone else become good at creature comforts building?
I never really camped long enough to try, but I really like his attitude! :thumb:

I'd much rather be stuck with him than the other guy that overreacts at everything.
 

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What are we talking about here?
I think it's about wasting time and energy to make a hammock vice just sleeping on the ground; or making a chair to sit in vice saving energy and sitting in the dirt. You bring up "weaving leaves/grasses" which I think is a very valuable skill, but do you focus on making a three-piece suit or baskets to collect food or make fish traps? I remember the one Naked and Afraid show where the girl spent hours making "dream catchers". Granted, that may help her emotionally, but that didn't improve their shelter situation; that would be a "creature comfort" in my book.

ROCK6
 

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After my tent or hammock is setup, water filtered and firewood gathered I look around for things that will make the camp more comfortable. It may be as simple as tying a log with paracord between two trees for a seat to a raised platform for my stove and erecting a tarp for rain.

The outdoors should be enjoyable. To me a part of that enjoyment is making myself comfortable as possible.
 

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After my tent or hammock is setup, water filtered and firewood gathered I look around for things that will make the camp more comfortable. It may be as simple as tying a log with paracord between two trees for a seat to a raised platform for my stove and erecting a tarp for rain.
Wait, wut? All I see there is a thin limb attached at knee level that could only be good for tripping you in the dark as you get out of your hammock to go take a pee.

How do you sit on that or rest a stove on it? I must be missing something.
 

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Well Ninja, there is a string of LED lights that directs me after dark to pee. I find knee high as perfect for sitting. If you notice there is a yellow bag hanging near to steer you away from the log. My creature comforts may not be yours and my butt doesn't need a big log.
 

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Back when I was regularly taking survival training, I learned a solid camp (especially for a long term stay) is one of those things you NEVER regret putting time into.

I once was on a course and they had a Day Three camp check since we had to have made a certain amount of progress.

They come to my camp and see I have a raised lean to style shelter, blazed path to the privy, rain shield and pot stick over the fire, I had a table built by lashing two cross poles to a pair of trees and putting shingle cut wood strips on it, a small chair built by the stream to be dry and comfy while I fish, fish weirs, and a covered firewood pile. I was building other stuff too...and I think I had a smoker built by then as well...been a while....

Instructors (pair) were laughing. "Done this before?" they asked.

I smiled.


See, I knew that if I failed to gather food and such my energy levels would start to suffer. I had to be out there for weeks to pass. With that thinking, I used my first few days energy on stuff that would make life easier later. That meant later on, if things were bad (lack of food, poor weather, etc) I would not have to do as much to stay comfortable.

Comfort and ease do WONDERS for morale.
 

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Back when I was regularly taking survival training, I learned a solid camp (especially for a long term stay) is one of those things you NEVER regret putting time into.

I once was on a course and they had a Day Three camp check since we had to have made a certain amount of progress.

They come to my camp and see I have a raised lean to style shelter, blazed path to the privy, rain shield and pot stick over the fire, I had a table built by lashing two cross poles to a pair of trees and putting shingle cut wood strips on it, a small chair built by the stream to be dry and comfy while I fish, fish weirs, and a covered firewood pile. I was building other stuff too...and I think I had a smoker built by then as well...been a while....

Instructors (pair) were laughing. "Done this before?" they asked.

I smiled.


See, I knew that if I failed to gather food and such my energy levels would start to suffer. I had to be out there for weeks to pass. With that thinking, I used my first few days energy on stuff that would make life easier later. That meant later on, if things were bad (lack of food, poor weather, etc) I would not have to do as much to stay comfortable.

Comfort and ease do WONDERS for morale.
I've said this for years about comfort. The bottom line is, the more comfortable you are, the better you will fare in the long run. Great post!:thumb:
 
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