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Live Secret, Live Happy
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My wife grew up here in Ok. I grew up on a corn/soybean farm in Iowa. We now live in the Ozarks of Eastern Oklahoma.
When we decided to move back to her home state after I retired five yrs ago, I started looking for land all over the state.
She quickly corrected me.

Oklahoma is bisected by the dry line, and the panhandle and western half dry out every single year, while to eastern part very rarely experiences a drought.
This feature is called the dry line, and it pretty much follows the route of interstate 35, from Southern Texas, to Central Minnesota.

We ended up buying a small ranch in Eastern Oklahoma, where it averages 40" per yr. I am trying to create a similar homestead here.
My latest project is to clear off the weeds, brush, and seedling trees, from several acres, and plant pecan/chestnut trees, fruit trees, and a garden.
I planted over 100 trees last week, and I have more odered for this spring.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Start small. Plenty of lawn there for a garden and chicken pen to start. Then, as years go by, work your way out. As you go, in years, add more, like orchards, berries, firewood, etc. The key is to start small so to not be overwhelmed.
I planted orchards in my first and second years. I knew that these trees would require 10+ years to reach maturity, and I did not want to wait any longer than I had to.
 

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Beware of the dog!
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I planted orchards in my first and second years. I knew that these trees would require 10+ years to reach maturity, and I did not want to wait any longer than I had to.
Great advice. /\ /\ /\

And, walk the area and study that aerial photograph, and then walk the area some more. Maybe even print out a few copies of that photograph for sketching and making notes. Figure out now where you would probably want the orchard before you start planning and building other things. Also consider possible placement of single trees, maybe a few different nut trees. A sugar maple tree could offer you some syrup about 8 or 10 years down the road. Maple syrup is a natural sugar source and yummy on pancakes, waffles, and french toast.

I also drove around my area and just looked at the older farm type houses to see what set ups and arrangements they had, even if I didn't copy them sometimes it gave me a different idea.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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I walked all around this property with a GPS in my pocket. Then later at home I downloaded the data and used some free software to convert that data into a map.

When I filed for a building permit, I printed that map out with the exact location where I wanted my house to sit.

The state zoning office called me two weeks later to say that they had never gotten such a detailed site-map that was 'to scale' before. They loved it.
 

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I planted orchards in my first and second years. I knew that these trees would require 10+ years to reach maturity, and I did not want to wait any longer than I had to.
i agree that trees take time to mature and should be planted as soon as you can ,but there is no sense in planting something you might not survive to see produce,,, so I think a garden comes first, it produces the first year and with luck from then on ,a lot of the plan needs to consider how long you have until you need it, if you think we only have a couple years then you will starve out long before the trees start to help, the other thing consider is cost if you try planting a fair sized orchard its going to cost hundreds of dollars that same amount in garden tools/seeds could get you into a huge garden
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Every year that you delay planting an orchard delays when it will begin to produce.

I like orchards, because you only plant the trees once, and they will produce food for many decades.

We plant garden crops every year, and I prune our trees and vines once a year. preparing the soil for planting requires far more labor, every year, than does fruit trees and a vineyard.
 

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A 2-3 hundred dollars will buy you a dozen berry bushes and 5 plus fruit trees and those are not the cheapest prices out there.

I started my raspberry patch with 6 small pots from home depot for 7 bucks each. 4 years later I have enough after diving to cover almost a 1/4 acre. They are a great cheap investment for money and labor that produce a lot on their 2nd year.
 

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A 2-3 hundred dollars will buy you a dozen berry bushes and 5 plus fruit trees and those are not the cheapest prices out there.

I started my raspberry patch with 6 small pots from home depot for 7 bucks each. 4 years later I have enough after diving to cover almost a 1/4 acre. They are a great cheap investment for money and labor that produce a lot on their 2nd year.
a month or so ago I got my seed order , i had spent 180 and from that I can plant over 40000 square feet of garden or just under a acre with seed left over


don't get it ,,if I spent 2 -3 hundred on seeds I could grow over a acre of garden the first year and and be able to eat well if it grew good along with seed saving from that it could be acres the next year

I am not saying not to plant trees/berry bushes, but my first priority would be a garden from a decent garden you could eat and save seeds for the rest of your life i understand that the work load of a orchard, berry bushes is less but it also takes more years of time before the harvest will start to feed you
 

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A marathon not a sprint
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If you want to set it up for optimized production, I suggest you determine where you want to do your first orchard, best spot for sun and airflow , that you can fence to safely run geese , ducks or chickens in later depending on seasonal wetness, and get that planting started first year because depending where you are it can take years to get production . Get varieties for your climate to begin with and a bit of an across the spectrum of what you eat . You can add to it subsequent years if it is hard on the budget . THings like blueberry, raspberry, strawberry, currants and elderberry … well those are easier to start from salvaging from others cuttings and runners so maybe check with gardeners around. YOU can also graft varieties onto existing trees later giving more variety . Study all the permaculture gurus like Geoff Lawton and Joel Salatin types and give deep thought to how you want to do all your fencing and layout , run water lines , permanent vs. portable housing of stock etc. Sometimes a bit of a delay to truly think something through is worth it in the long run . Planting a fenced veggie garden may be well advised to leave room for a bit of a plant nursery where you can grow out other plants a year or two before planting them to compete with other plants . It has taken me 4 years and I am still figuring out how to optimize everything and have them work with some degree of synchronicity integrating livestock and plant production . And it will always be unique to your own micro climate, conditions and physical capability , soils , water resource etc.

I added to my orchard each year , have continued working on fencing and gates, continued adding shelters , added naturalized plantings as well as those in the kitchen garden . For livestock I think chickens is easiest to start with , and I would push hard to build a rodent /predator proof chicken pen / house before ever even buying a chicken .

I am struggling now to site a large greenhouse that was an afterthought , now that the gardens are planted so if that is in your future , think about the size and siting even if you don't have it in your budget year one .
 

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I planted fruit trees before I knew the deal was complete on the land sale. It was a scary time for me because of Obummer. But now the trees are starting to bear.

With only 2 acres I would be careful where you plant trees so they won't eventually shade your garden. Like mostly along your north property line.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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To be honest, neither planting a garden, or planting an orchard were my first priorities after I moved to my ranch.

First, I needed to build the access road, have the electric coop install power, and hire a well company to redrill the well.
Second, I needed to build a pole barn, and winterize my 5th wheel trailer.

Next, I cleared enough trees and brush to make space.
Then I had contractors build a log house on a full basement.

Notw that I have storage, and a nice house, I started planting trees, and I have garden seed waiting for warmer soil temps.

I lived in a tent for eight weeks until I could tow the 5th wheel in here. I would not try planting trees or a garden, before you have a secure place to live.
 

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I am the opposite of some people. I have been living on my property for almost 3 years. I still don't have any structures built that could be lived in. I did build a free standing roof for shade and rain catchment. I sometimes sleep on a picnic table I placed underneath, or a tent I made, or in my van.
I planted fruit and nut trees first. I hauled water for 2 weeks until I built the water catchment. Second I started digging a pond for water storage and to start raising some fish. Third was digging a root cellar for food storage and protection from tornados. I might build a small shed or dome this summer for tool storage and extreme bad weather shelter.
"Food and water is always first." I can sleep year around, under a tarp or in a tent with a sleeping bag, anywhere in the lower 48 and not worry about freezing. Sometimes it might not be the most comfortable but I enjoy it.
But I know I will eat food and drink water everyday. Plant fruit and nut trees today. Acorns are my most abundant resource, make use of them if you have them.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I am the opposite of some people. I have been living on my property for almost 3 years. I still don't have any structures built that could be lived in. I did build a free standing roof for shade and rain catchment. I sometimes sleep on a picnic table I placed underneath, or a tent I made, or in my van.
I planted fruit and nut trees first. I hauled water for 2 weeks until I built the water catchment. Second I started digging a pond for water storage and to start raising some fish. Third was digging a root cellar for food storage and protection from tornados. I might build a small shed or dome this summer for tool storage and extreme bad weather shelter.
"Food and water is always first." I can sleep year around, under a tarp or in a tent with a sleeping bag, anywhere in the lower 48 and not worry about freezing. Sometimes it might not be the most comfortable but I enjoy it.
But I know I will eat food and drink water everyday. Plant fruit and nut trees today. Acorns are my most abundant resource, make use of them if you have them.
Glad to hear you now have a root cellar. We had a tornado near by while I was still living in my tent. Not fun.
 

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I have a unfinished root cellar. I have way to many unfinished projects. It is usable but still unfinished. I get distracted fishing and hunting whenever I can. Pulled some nice catfish out of the Canadian today. I was in my parents house in 91 when a F5 flattened it to the ground. It was a huge tornado that hit Wichita.
 

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Every year that you delay planting an orchard delays when it will begin to produce.

I like orchards, because you only plant the trees once, and they will produce food for many decades.

We plant garden crops every year, and I prune our trees and vines once a year. preparing the soil for planting requires far more labor, every year, than does fruit trees and a vineyard.
A perennial is less maintenance than an annual, this is obvious. Apples and grapes are wonderful treats. I do not view them as a must have for nutrition. For nutrition, I concentrate on my vegetables.
 
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