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Discussion Starter #1
The coyotes are getting brave and making moves on the chickens during the middle of the day. I have found myself unprepared to deal with the coyotes.

I do not have a coyote call.

Can not put out foothold traps because my dogs and my cousins dogs will get in them.


Solution

Rather than sitting in the woods and hoping a coyote walks by, I decided to purchase a coyote call. The call I decided on is the Extreme Dimension Wildlife Call, model EDMR302.

The EDMR302 is a remote control call that is supposed to work up to 150 yards. Around here in southeast Texas the only way you are going to shoot 100 yards is if you are on a pipeline, creek bottom or highline. In the woods shots of 50 yards are about the best you can hope for.

For up close shots I made sure the AR-15 Primary Arms MD-06L red dot optic was sighted in at 50 yards. It was a little off and needed some adjustment.

For a little further shots I sent a few rounds with the FN/FAL down range.

I would like to make sure the Remington model 700 in 280 Remington / 7mm express is scoped in.

Towards the end of January I plan on setting up the call on a highline close to my house, and again on a creek a 1/4 mile or so from my house.

Hopefully by the end of January those chicken killing coyotes will be sent to their maker.

Tula results at the range

While at the Range Tula ammo was used to sight in the Primary Arms MD-06L red dot optic.

The groups were acceptable and there were no malfunctions to report. This is a red dot optic so I was not expecting the same results I would get with a scope. I would be confident to say I was getting a 5 inch group at 50 yards off a rest. I was using a backpack as a rest.
 

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King of Canada
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That's one way to go about it.

How is your coop set up? (I don't think I have ever saw it before).

If you have a coop, are they getting under/in/through somewhere?

If you don't have a coop, may I suggest building one? I'm not sure if it's in your budget or not, but if you can afford to build one; I'd suggest it.

Put in cement around the perimeter, then put up some sturdy posts and a strong chain link or similar fencing material.

It helps out, around here with all of the wolves, coyotes, and fox.
 

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If you want to hunt at night on your own property set up a light on a pull switch with a red light in it. Put the bait on the pull switch with wire or cord, when the bait is taken the light comes on and dogs of any kind don't see in the red light that they are lit up. Some times I get two or three in a night, also a few feral dogs have been taken.
Good hunting, Mark
 

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That style call will work well once you figure out what catches those dogs attention. Just do not let them catch on it is a call box or they will learn to avoid it in short order. Keep your distance, be absolutely sure they won't wind you when they come in to the box. Try tying a couple feathers somewhere next to the call box to give them a visual target and some fresh scent besides your own can help attract any educated coyote. Some dogs you can reel in on a line but others have learned human games and will be much much more wary. Sounds like fun, wish I could help!!! Lol
 

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I had problems with them here in florida. They had taken severaI chickens. I went out one evening to close the hen house door and stopped about mid way. My "spidey" senses were going wild so i did a 360 spotlight sweep. Imagine my surprise when i had about 15 SETS of eyes staring back at me about 25 yards away! Then one set of eyes slowly raised up to a height of about 6' (that was the pack leader standing on his hind legs). I pulled my cc 9mm and popped the standing buggar! Before i could get a second shot the whole pack exploded in all directions and disappeared.
A few days later as i swept the barnyard commando style with AR and mounted flashlight i encountered the pack right at the entrance to the hen house. The red dot reduced the pack by one again and they again used the amscray method to evaporate. I havent seen them since for over a year. With the loss of two pack members i think they are avoiding my place. (Either that or they are busy having pups so they can come and attack everything in force!)
Bottom line they are big!! They are hunting in packs!! Even an adult human isnt safe with large coyote packs!
As i understand it the loss of interest Americans have in hunting necessitated that the fish and game division re-introduced coyotes and red wolves all over the United states as apex preditors.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I have four large dogs. The biggest is a 130 lb male Anatolian named Kahn.

The area is over run by coyotes, yet they dont bother my sheep, and they don't come up close to the buildings.

My dogs eat a lot of chow. But I don't worry much about losing stock.
 

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I have four large dogs. The biggest is a 130 lb male Anatolian named Kahn.

The area is over run by coyotes, yet they dont bother my sheep, and they don't come up close to the buildings.

My dogs eat a lot of chow. But I don't worry much about losing stock.
The OP had dogs and still a coyote problem. Getting dogs that will attack coyotes is not hard. The thing is to make sure they do not kill your critters. The post where a poster saw 15 pairs of eyes is scary. A pack of that size is likely killing livestock and are capable of killing humans for sure. They might eat guard dogs regardless of the size. A coyote standing 6 ft I doubt, But I have seen a dead road kill coyote that for sure could of made close to 4 ft. They can be very long and rangy. I think that one was likely 40lbs. Eastern coyotes are getting bigger since they are taking the place of the extinct wolves that they are replacing and even have eastern wolf and dog genes in them.
 

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I am still of the opinion that if you fail to provide a fenced area constructed of quality fence you will forever take losses.
You do have point with the fence. I use a 5 ft fence to limit where my guard dogs can go. I doubt that it will stop the coyotes, but I do not want a dog running off in the my near by wetlands and get jumped by the pack and me not around to help it out. To keep coyotes out the fence must stop them from getting under and also over.
 

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Getting There!
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My fence works fine for me. The coyotes come right up to it, but never try coming in. My two dogs challenge them at night and run along the fence playing with them when the sun comes up.

We all have our own ideas, but you must provide protection for chickens first and foremost from my experiences. A secure coop to latch them in night and a quality fence covering enough area that they are not inclined to fly over to protect from stray dogs, coyotes and dangers like these is essential; if you want to keep your chickens.
 

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I second the coop within the fence. We have a secure coup that is enclosed by a high chained link fence with netting over the top. We button the girls up at night and let them out in the morning. We have had zero problems with critters getting in and we are in bear country. We have had bears in the yard attacking the trash but they never bother the girls. Same with large dogs roaming the neighborhood and coyotes/bobcats in the adjacent national forest. A good fence is your best defense.
 

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Never seen a pack of more than 6-7 coyotes, around here it is usually 3-4 at most. The 15 number would scare the crap out of me. I would hate to ask any dog to fend off that many. One thing I will say is that if you plan on shooting inside 50 yds at coyotes try a shotgun with buckshot or turkey shot. It will give you a little more lee way on the follow up shots.

May sound crazy, but if they are coming up during the day, use a small chicken or another animal that cries alot as bait like in the opening scene of enemy at the gates. Just don't shoot the bait, lol. I have seen this work several times and the coyotes seem to learn to leave you alone.
 

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This may seem cruel but the best I have seen is a kitten on top of a post. They whine really loud and will bring in both coyotes and bobcats. For some reason bobcats can't resist it. For all of the people saying that is cruel, the kitten gets a nice warm cup of milk and a nice warm blanket when it gets home. Not bad for sitting on top of a post for a couple of hours.
 

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I have control issues
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The coyotes here come out during the day, as well. Saw a couple of them out by my neighbor's barn the other day. Haven't had any issues with them getting at my chickens. The girls have a coop/welded wire run setup that sits 2-3 feet INSIDE a 10x20 chain-link fence. with the double-fencing, the coyotes don't even try
 

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The groups were acceptable and there were no malfunctions to report. This is a red dot optic so I was not expecting the same results I would get with a scope. I would be confident to say I was getting a 5 inch group at 50 yards off a rest. I was using a backpack as a rest.
5 inch groups at 50 yards from a rest with red dot or iron sights from an AR15, something sounds wrong there. That is 10 moa. It was tula ammo you said. I would try some other brand assuming everything is right on the gun. I can do a lot better with iron sights at a 100rds. The "Primary Arms MD-06L red dot optic" from looking at pricing on the internet for similar primary arms optics I see 89.99 pricing for it that strongly suggests a cheap optic assuming I saw the correct model. I have paid over $500 dollars for my micro red dots. Quality is seldom cheap.
 

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Everything I have read about the primary arms have shown that they are a decent sight, but they aren't nearly as durable as the $500+ ones. I don't have one though so can't say for sure. If I had to bet the Tula is at fault, some rifles like it some don't. I have shot less than 2" groups with it at 100 yds, so it is totally lot/rifle dependent.
 

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This may seem cruel but the best I have seen is a kitten on top of a post. They whine really loud and will bring in both coyotes and bobcats. For some reason bobcats can't resist it. For all of the people saying that is cruel, the kitten gets a nice warm cup of milk and a nice warm blanket when it gets home. Not bad for sitting on top of a post for a couple of hours.
How about playing a recording from the kitten on a post.
 
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