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Plants don't run!
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So I've always wanted to go coyote hunting, don't know why other than the challenge. So I was wondering if you guys have any tips?

I have the predator calls and locating howls and all that. Have been practicing with them for maybe a year now to mimic the guys on youtube and all that.

Would I be able to use my AK? I'm thinking of putting a Kobra red dot sight on it for quicker shot at them.

Go ahead teach me something! :)

-Thoughtful Wolf
 

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I've only hunted coyotes on our farm where the ground is open not blocked by trees so I can only offer you advice on open field hunting. Over the years it seems like the best time to hunt them is after the first snows begin to fall. By then the crops are out and their tracks become more apparent. they will always run a diagonal line away from your location.
For purpose of luring them to a location I've "heard" that if you can get your hands on a couple dead baby pigs from say a hog farm you can pin these to the ground with a large opening wire fence held down with tent stakes. If you do this in early winter, their food source will start to become scarce and they will jump on the bait. With a high powered rifle you can pick at least one off from your position 100 to 200 yards away.

Or on the other hand I've heard of people just simply running them over with snowmobiles!
 

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Information is Ammunition
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what is the purpose? do they get into the livestock?
 
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Misfit Toy
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IMO: This type of activity is exactly what gives hunters/outdoorsman a bad name.

It's very difficult to justify killing for sport. I think anyone can understand the agricultural community finding it necessary to alleviate the threat of predation, or even those working/contracting with the DNR having to reduce the population of predatory animals for reasons of public safety.

But to sit and ambush an animal with no intention of harvesting it for sustenance or absolute necessity is not only immoral in my opinion, but gives the hunting/fishing enthusiasts a black eye in a society already opposed to hunting/shooting sports.

Man, if ya want to sit and random fire an AK at living things just to watch them die...I would suggest Iraq. Or...if you're like me and missed that ship, free lance in say, oh...Chechnya or somewhere. You'll get all blood sport you can handle.;)
 

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IMO: This type of activity is exactly what gives hunters/outdoorsman a bad name.

It's very difficult to justify killing for sport. I think anyone can understand the agricultural community finding it necessary to alleviate the threat of predation, or even those working/contracting with the DNR having to reduce the population of predatory animals for reasons of public safety.

But to sit and ambush an animal with no intention of harvesting it for sustenance or absolute necessity is not only immoral in my opinion, but gives the hunting/fishing enthusiasts a black eye in a society already opposed to hunting/shooting sports.

Man, if ya want to sit and random fire an AK at living things just to watch them die...I would suggest Iraq. Or...if you're like me and missed that ship, free lance in say, oh...Chechnya or somewhere. You'll get all blood sport you can handle.;)
When's the last time you bought leather shoes? Wouldn't canvas work just as well? Judge yourself before you judge others.
 

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Krazy Kitty
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When I lived in Mass it was illegal to hunt them. Don't know if they changed the law yet. They have been bringing down pets and livestock left and right. When I lived at home my neighbor called in the middle of the night and talked to my stepdad, who is a good ole Tennessee boy. The neighbor said he heard his chickens making a racket so went out to investigate. The coyote ran after him. So my stepdad went out and shot it right between the eyes when it came after him. We saw it the next morning and I felt sad. They are a beautiful animal.
 

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Misfit Toy
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When's the last time you bought leather shoes? Wouldn't canvas work just as well? Judge yourself before you judge others.
Shoe leather is a by-product made from animals harvested for food. Get your facts straight.

And I'm not judging anyone...I'm simply stating a fact. This is exactly why our second amendment rights hang in the balance is because the leftist extremists are working very diligently to convince society and the general public that hunters and sportsman are nothing more than kill-crazy ******** and hillbillies.

I support hunting and the hunting sports. Always have, always will. It gives far more to the species that it ever takes away. But I do not support trophy hunting or bloodsports.

And I grow tired of defending good sportsman and their practices to anti-gun/anti-hunting people who do not understand why this tradition is necessary to overall animal wellfare because of those who walk the thin line of right & wrong.
 

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Plants don't run!
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No don't get me wrong. I WILL eat it. If I don't like eating it, I will never hunt them again. I feel very wrong about killing something just to kill it. That is not my intention. If I kill something I try and use all of it that I can and will do so with the coyote.
 

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I shoot coyotes on sight with no intentions of recovering. I trap em year round as well. They are an invasive species here that has almost wiped out the native fox. Not to mention i have three calves right now that are missing a nose or ear from those bastards. I know that might not be the case everywhere but it is here. You will never get rid of coyotes or pigs so the best you can do is constant pressure to TRY to keep the numbers in check and give their native competition a chance.
 

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Coyote's are a real problem here, the farmers try to kill as many as they can. 72Shane knows what he's talking about.

I haven't gone coyote hunting in a few years but to bait them is the best way IMO.
Dead deer works really good in an open field near some cover and a good rifle with a scope.
 

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American fearmaker
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Coyotes are a pest where I live. People hunt them all year long and don't bother with trying to recover their bodies for anything unless its a bounty on them.

Most guys who hunt them locally use a .223 caliber rifle or a good .22 magnum rifle with a tactical type scope or red dot. Coyotes are flighty animals and are always suspicious of approaching anything, even an honest meal. Yotes, as the local hunters call them, are hunted at night and often in the area of a dead deer (roadkill) using calls to bring them in close. Yotes have fantastic smelling abilities and won't come near anything if they smell near by people.
 

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Coyote's are a real problem here, the farmers try to kill as many as they can. 72Shane knows what he's talking about.

I haven't gone coyote hunting in a few years but to bait them is the best way IMO.
Dead deer works really good in an open field near some cover and a good rifle with a scope.
I was gonna say the same but did'nt want to take a beating over it. Yep, we bait them. A netted potatoe sack full of gut's nailed about three feet up a tree.
 

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I shoot coyotes on sight with no intentions of recovering. I trap em year round as well. They are an invasive species here that has almost wiped out the native fox. Not to mention i have three calves right now that are missing a nose or ear from those bastards. I know that might not be the case everywhere but it is here. You will never get rid of coyotes or pigs so the best you can do is constant pressure to TRY to keep the numbers in check and give their native competition a chance.
In my state there is a bounty for them. The rules are really lax as well. Continous open season, dogs, artificial light, no limit, no shooting hours, and I even believe radios can be used to coordinate group efforts. Virtually anything goes! They are extremely hard on fox populations as you say. Often times fur markets pay a good price for their pelts making it worthwhile skinning them. The supply is also virtually limitless. Govt studies have shown that no amount of hunting,trapping or even poisoning will get rid of them. When coyote numbers are down the females make up for it by having larger litters of pups. As long as the food supply remains intact there will be coyotes.
 

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Deus exsisto laus
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We own three sections in west Texas. Run cattle on them.There are alot of deer,wild turkey,dove,quail, feral hogs,and coyotes. We have a cabin out there and I enjoy listening to the coyote packs howling to each other while sitting around the fire. They are beautiful animals and have their place in nature.However,we do have to occasionally "thin the population" of excess coyotes. What happens is the feral hogs reproduce rather quickly,( a ready food source).The coyotes eat the feral piglets and there is a population boom in coyote pups.Allowed to go unchecked,the hog population can't support that many excess coyotes, so the coys start hunting deer fawns,turkey poults and sometimes (not often, but sometimes) beef calves.Then, if it is still unchecked,Mother Nature starves off the excess coys until a balance is achieved.We hunt out there to feed our families,not to put a head on the wall. So we intervene.Shots are far out over open ground,sometimes from behind mesquite bushes.I use a .303 British,my brother, .30-06. We never try to "wipe them out",we don't want them all gone.It's just to keep things balanced. BTW,don't eat a coyote,you'll not like it! It just wouldn't be Texas without a starry night sky, a camp fire and the distant doleful howls of the coyote.TP
 

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Down this far south the hide isnt worth skinning even during the winter. I do though cause im skinnin anyway. Our season is year round as well but the state stopped the bounty cause it caused alot of interstate trafick IMO. Yotes killed in other states were being brought here for the money. Hunting is effective but not as effective as trapping. Instead of one gun a few hours a day, I'd rather have a few dozen traps working 24/7.

To the OP, sorry to get off topic but to answer your question. I used to hunt yotes a good bit and i did it with a pred call and a bow. At night i would use a rifle or shotgun, depending on the terrain. Coyotes can be tough to call and you need to be careful not to educate em. If you do, give up and move on.

One way i hunted was at night with a .22, red spot light, and a mouse squeaker. I would ease around the pasture or loggin roads where i had seen tracks or heard yipping stopping every spot where i could see a bit. I would call lightly for maybe two minutes and then shine. They say the red dosent spook em but i couldnt tell a diff. I used red anyway. I would see there eyes and just watch em come in range and pop.

In the day, it was a different story. I had the best luck at dawn and dusk. Go about it like spring turkey hunting. HIDE...no movement at all cause they are lookin for ya and will see you and be gone before you even knew they were there. Sometimes they would circle so a second shooter downwind of the caller will help. I would call loudly for a few minutes, wait and look a few minutes and start over. If you aint seen one in 30 minutes move on. Either they aint interested or you've been busted and didnt know it.

Then again, my boy has gone out playing a distress rabbit call in the truck and shoot em from proppin on the door. I think it will depend on the hunting pressure. Just hunt them like you would a spring gobbler with a nose...lol..thats what it boils down to really. Hope this helps ya...shane
 

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We own three sections in west Texas. Run cattle on them.There are alot of deer,wild turkey,dove,quail, feral hogs,and coyotes. We have a cabin out there and I enjoy listening to the coyote packs howling to each other while sitting around the fire. They are beautiful animals and have their place in nature.However,we do have to occasionally "thin the population" of excess coyotes. What happens is the feral hogs reproduce rather quickly,( a ready food source).The coyotes eat the feral piglets and there is a population boom in coyote pups.Allowed to go unchecked,the hog population can't support that many excess coyotes, so the coys start hunting deer fawns,turkey poults and sometimes (not often, but sometimes) beef calves.Then, if it is still unchecked,Mother Nature starves off the excess coys until a balance is achieved.We hunt out there to feed our families,not to put a head on the wall. So we intervene.Shots are far out over open ground,sometimes from behind mesquite bushes.I use a .303 British,my brother, .30-06. We never try to "wipe them out",we don't want them all gone.It's just to keep things balanced. BTW,don't eat a coyote,you'll not like it! It just wouldn't be Texas without a starry night sky, a camp fire and the distant doleful howls of the coyote.TP
You can keep all the pretty coyotes out there...I want my fox back!
 

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Mall Ninja Hunter
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Aside from hearing them sing at night I can't think of any reason not to kill them. They will kill your livestock, chickens, dogs, cats, deer, fox, rabbits, everything and anything.

We like to listen to them sing at night but when they pack up and hunt that's a whole nother story.

They make a terrifying sound when on a kill.

They are very skitterish, hard to call in if they suspect anything.
 

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I dont go looking for them. The ones I have shot have all been from my back porch. They are opportunists, and I dont want to give them any opportunities. I lost most of my chickens to them last year. So far this year I havent lost any chickens to the 'yotes. Havent seen any in a while so I think they figured out this isnt a good place to hunt anymore. I do love listening to them at night though.
 
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