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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At this point in my prepping (the beginning) I don’t have much at all for food preps but canned goods in my panty.

I realize with just about anything in life if you do a “custom” job that you end up with a better result for less investment (build your own house, etc). That being said a friend brought to my attention that Costco has “Prep Buckets” on their site. I took a look at them and was quite surprised to find that the pricing didn’t seem that hight to me and no it’s not dinner at the Four Seasons, but you certainly wouldn’t be starving to death.

I was wondering peoples thoughts on getting a few “Prep Buckets”, lets say 90 days worth to shore up my meager supplies until I am in a position to get a BOL and start storing food there.

Thanks for your input.:thumb:

30 days:
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11649759&whse=BC&topnav=&cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-categorypageHorizontalTop-_-PopularProductsInCategory

1 year:
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11613699&whse=BC&topnav=&cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-categorypageHorizontalTop-_-PopularProductsInCategory
 

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wow thats a lot of money to outlay all at once.

I'm also just starting out, but I like the philosophy of store what you eat and eat what you store. Prepping food then becomes merely shopping ahead of time and storing the extras. If you like eating freeze dried food, then I suppose it would make sense to drop $3k on it, but I'd be surprised if this was anyones first choice.

Seems more logical to learn what you need to here about proper storage, then start doubling (or tripling) your typical grocery trip. Then put away your extras into a rotation system. This way your very next grocery trip will net you a few days supply of extra food. You can then add onto this every grocery trip (particularly when sale items appear).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow thats a lot of money to outlay all at once.

I'm also just starting out, but I like the philosophy of store what you eat and eat what you store. Prepping food then becomes merely shopping ahead of time and storing the extras. If you like eating freeze dried food, then I suppose it would make sense to drop $3k on it, but I'd be surprised if this was anyones first choice.

Seems more logical to learn what you need to here about proper storage, then start doubling (or tripling) your typical grocery trip. Then put away your extras into a rotation system. This way your very next grocery trip will net you a few days supply of extra food. You can then add onto this every grocery trip (particularly when sale items appear).
I’m with you on all of your points.:thumb: And I have been “stocking” every time I go shopping (mostly canned goods). The canned goods are only good for 3-4 years though. True I can eat and replace them as they get close to going bad.:)

What intrigued me about the buckets (the 30 day ones more than the year) was that just a few of them would be great for anything short of total SHTF, they are very portable if bugging out, the pricing is not bad at all, they store forever and if you needed to they would be pretty easy to cache.

I’m in no position to stock up a ton of wheat, corn, etc or even be able to transport or effectively make food out of it at this point. My final goals are to have a BOL or sell my house and live in a better located one that can be my BOL. And that that point be able to stock and use “unprepared” food stores effectively.

As far as expense goes I think the year supply of food is pretty inexpensive. If you were to buy the year quantity and it was good for 10 years (the short end of it) and never ate any of it you only invested $.82/day to have a years worth of food on hand in case of total SHTF. That’s pretty cheap “life insurance” in my book. I pay about $3/day to insure my truck. And I can’t eat my truck.:D:

Anyhoo, just thought I would throw it out there. I’m probably going to pick a few 30 day buckets up for me, the wife and the dogs (its cheaper than dog food!) to give me a little immediate "long term" insurance while I put my larger plans into effect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow everyone must be preparing now if you can get products at Costco.
I know right! I was quite surprised. Mass market prepping, go figure.:D:

Maybe this menas that more people will be better of in case of disaster. It would be nice to think that more tham 1/4 of one % of the population will not be looking for handouts.:thumb:
 

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Prep - sure thing!

Here is how I prepare. As you look at what you get, you notice the absence of Meat / Chicken and a lot of carbs. So what the wife and I do now. Is buy a case of dehydrated meats at a time then stock up on pasta, grains, and beans. (You get the picture) so we can make our own meals. The way I figure it is to leave the meat prep to those people who know what they are doing. Grains, once the O2 is removed last a long time if prepared correctly. Go check out You Tube on dehydrating food. LOTS of good info to process and I hope you save money too!

here is a link -

http://www.augasonfarms.com/food-storage/Meats-Freeze-Dried-Chicken-Chunks-16oz-Can

Thanks for posting!

Peace and God Bless
 

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I used to feel like you and wanted to hurry up and buy a ready made kit, to be done with that task. I really do understand that urgent feeling!

I have learned from my earlier food storage, and one of the most important lessons is to make sure you LOVE eating what you store, not just barely tolerate.

Chances are if you are relying solely on food storage it is because of hardship. It is easy enough to feel depressed and have appetite fatigue with the modern world's stresses. How many times does your family have no opinion on what they want for dinner etc.

If you add in the stress of truly hard times, it becomes especially important to ensure you can tolerate the foods physically and get the needed nutrition from it.
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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Squidd..

I say go ahead and buy em, just another piece of the puzzle in my book....I have several, then can make good additional stores and/or be used as charity...

Either way, i think it best to be well rounded, and these help round out my stores...

In the blue buckets, i have rice/beans/misc/ cans of tuna in oil..ea 5 gal bucket will hold 77 cans of tuna....
 

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Go to youtube and punch in Zombie Tactics (I'm told he's a member of this website) He does a series on prepping which is great-especially #10-wherein he explains how to make Knorrs Sides last alot longer! BTW-if you grab a 100 pound bag of rice at Costco it lasts a long long time and you can add all kinds of things to make different meals. Also,at our Costco they have cases of Top Ramen,48-3oz packages to a case for $7.45 per case. Top Ramen isn't big on nutrition,meaning vitamins and minerals but they have a good amount of calories-and according to Zombie Tactics in a SHTF scenario calories are King. Of course you can add all sorts of things to Top Ramen-beans, chili, tuna, etc. Keep prepping!
Just realized: When you go to youtube don't punch in Zombie Tactics-DO punch in FOOD PREP FOR THE LAZY LATE AND CHEAP.
 

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I've been buying canned food items and marking each can with the "use by date" in large letters ( easy to spot on the shelf). But I keep hearing about cans of food that have been found that are sometimes over 40 or 50 years old and when opened are still eatable. Does anybody know just how long canned stuff will really last?
 

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I've been buying canned food items and marking each can with the "use by date" in large letters ( easy to spot on the shelf). But I keep hearing about cans of food that have been found that are sometimes over 40 or 50 years old and when opened are still eatable. Does anybody know just how long canned stuff will really last?
Some people say for a long long time if the can isn't damaged. The "Best Used By"-as I understand it means the manufacturer thinks the taste, texture, etc of the product will be there if used by then-but the product can be consumed after that date-assuming I guess the can isnt damaged,swollen, etc. Also there are "shelf stable" products-Hormel products,Nalley products,Chef Boyardee,Bushs Baked Beans Green Giant-which they say are produced and canned in such a way as to last a long long time. Keep prepping!:)
 

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That "30 day" bucket sure beats the "275 serving" one from Sam's as far as actually having some food content and enough calories. But it's aweful expensive for what you get. As you mentioned, you can customize for less. But at least it actually contains 30 days worth.

As for their year supplies, never trust that. Always calculate calories per day. Often those year supplies turn out to be a 6-8 month supply at a high enough calorie rate to actually function. And remember, only FOOD calories count. A lot of those supplies contain cans of sugar and drink mixes to increase the "paper numbers" but that doesn't provide any real nutrition. I subtract them when calculating actual calories per day.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I've been buying canned food items and marking each can with the "use by date" in large letters ( easy to spot on the shelf). But I keep hearing about cans of food that have been found that are sometimes over 40 or 50 years old and when opened are still eatable. Does anybody know just how long canned stuff will really last?
Canned goods will last decades as long as they remain sealed. The processing method insures that they are sterile inside. So there's nothing that can breed and grow unless it can get in from outside. Over time, the taste and texture will slowly degrade, but the food is till entirely safe to eat.
 

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Wow everyone must be preparing now if you can get products at Costco.
Few of the stores actually have the products. Mostly it's online mail order only. And they're just responding to a market trend. The demand is still much lower than it was towards the Y2K rush, and even at that, a very small percentage of people prepared.

I'm glad to see the foods being sold in more public places though. It might open some people's eyes and get them prepping. The problem I see with that is that most people just don't have the ability to think in detail it seems. So I doubt that many of them are also preparing enough water to go along with their food. Even in here we have a huge number of "I have a year's supply of food, and 2 cases of water" type posts.
 

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Family Always Comes First
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It's always important to remember to properly rotate ALL of your food.

We label everything that comes in the door with a Sharpie with the Month/Year we bought it (example 07/2011 for July 2011) so we know what item is the oldest.

As we are placing food and other supplies in the pantry for storage, we always place the most recently purchased in the back, pulling everything forwad so we can only grab the oldest items first. This way, all of our food and supplies are using the oldest items first to help prevent ANYTHING going out of stock.

Automatic Can Rotators (do an internet search) are great for this because you load them on top and they roll so he oldest is always the first to be grabbed when needed.

Let's face it... food and preps are expensive and I don't know about you, but we sure don't ever want to waste hard earned money by having to throw out food because it's going out of date. (BTW, if you ever DO notice food about to go out of date, donate it to your local church and/or food bank and ask for a Tax Reciept. Might as well help others while getting a little back at tax time to buy more preps)

Most of our food preps are regular food, but we do have some Bulk (corn, rice, wheat, beans, etc...) and FD (Freeze Dried) foods in our preps too. BUT... we do eat it in our regular meals too and rotate it like we do with everything.

I think it's stupid to shell out a bunch of money for food you have never tried before. What if you find out later when you need it the most that it doesn't taste good, or you might not be able to propely digest it. A few TVP (Textured Vegatable Protien) Bacon Bits on your baked potato or salad might be fine, but what about when you're making a whole meal using flavored TVP (Taco, Beef, Pork, Chicken, ec...) as the meat substitute? Ever had really bad abdominal cramps and gas that would clear a whole movie theator? Better to try it now before you must depend on it. For that reason, we will ALWAYS buy a smaller container, even if it's more expensive that way, to try something before we buy it by the case or 5 gallon bucket. Powdered Milk is another good example of something to try before buying a lot of. Tastes will vary a lot between different brands.

Some Generic Canned Goods are the same way. Sure, you might eable to buy cases of generic green beans for $.25 per can, but when you go to cook it, you find it's very "woody" with lots of stems and poor quality. Again, buy a couple of cans and try it first before buying lots of it.

Don't sweat the fact that you might just be starting out with your preps. Like others have said before, make your regular shopping list based on a menu that you eat now.

When you go to purchase that food, insted of buying enough for the regular time period (example - two weeks worth), buy an additional amount to last 50% more time (example - three weeks worth) and don't forget to label it when you get home.

Now while you are at it, organize your food pantry. Label all food you already had with your best guess of when you bought it but if you are not sure, put something like a ? or * next to the date you write so you know to use that stuff up first. Put the newest food in the back so you have to use he oldest stuff first.

Now, as you prepare your food for the next 2 weeks, go ahead and make your next menu and shopping list for the 2 weeks coming, but again, buy 3 weeks worth of food. Label and rotate it into your pantry. At the end of that second 2 week period, you will repeat the cycle again. The good news is that you now have a 2 weeks worth of food stocked in your pantry!

See, that wasn't that hard and if you can keep this up each time you shop for food, in six months you'll have a 3 month supply of food stored of stuff you already like and eat everyday. In a year, you will have put away 6 months worth of food and doing it this way, it didn't cost you that much more than your regular shopping trip AND it's all food you already like to eat!

In addition to trying to purchas an additional 50% of food when you go food shopping, ALWAYS keep your eyes open for good deals. Take full advantage of good sales on items you could use, but again, always buy a small amount and try it before you dump a big chunk of money on something. Watch for sales on things like canned tuna. If it's good stuff, buy a couple of cases when you can afford to do so. Having extra things in addition to wht is on your regular menu is good to have.

Once you start your food storage program, having a way to organize it and keep track of it is also good. We use the Revlar FSP (Food Storage Program) to help us inventory our food storage and other supplies. The FSP is good because it allows you to put in your family size and then tells you how much you'll need to keep them all covered. It is also completly programable so you can customize the foods and supplies that your family uses and remove the items that you would never use. The FSP Program also helps you plan your shopping list to better help you stock up on other things (food or any other supplies you need/want in your preps) so you know how much to buy this week to meet your prep goal. You can progra it to have everything in whatever time period you want (example - One Year)

The main point is to get started. Once you do, you are already far better off than those that buy each days meals the day they will eat it. Remember, 50 to 100 years ago, our relatives always had stocked pantrys. They canned their own fruits and veggies and cured their own meats. If you follow what they did back then (when it was considered normal), you an quickly find your own food preps starting to build up.

Good luck.

Medic73
 

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When I was on vaction in Febuary 2011, I had a chance to meet with a guy who was a distribution center manager for Demonte foods. I asked him for the real deal on how long this stuff should last. He told me if the can is not damaged he has seen and eaten 15 year old product and could not tell the differance, just like what is in your pantry at home now. I beleived what he told me he seemed like a stand-up guy.
 
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