Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
SB Community,

I did a search on cornmeal and found some recipes, "what was your prep for today", etc. I'd like to know if anyone has personal experience with cornmeal as a prep? Obviously, I would use the mylar/O2 absorber routine, just wanted your thoughts.
 

·
Thank you very much
Joined
·
4,322 Posts
I think it is a good thing to store. I'm pretty sure it last long. I have around 100lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
It has been my experience that cornmeal is prone to insect infestation even in a sealed container. Maybe if it was frozen or heated (?) to kill insect eggs? And maybe if oxygen absorbers depleted all the oxygen there might not be any bugs?
Somebody with more knowledge please chime in because I don't really know how to keep cornmeal.
 

·
Mod Certified PITA!
Joined
·
12,092 Posts
Cornmeal is an excellent thing to have. But unless you freeze it, you need to get the de-germed stuff. It's less nutritious than if they leave the corn germ in, but it also has fewer oils in it and won't go bad as quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I have read that it will last 8 months in a airtight container and up to 2 yrs in freezer. The #10 cans are rated @ 5yrs under perfect conditions.
The corn oil and germ will go rancid quickly and you can tell by just smelling.

I grew up w/beans and corn bread once a week(both of my parents were in their early teens during the Great Depression and my Dad always thought of it as a reminder of what he grew up with).
I still try to do at least once a month w/my family as a reminder of my Dad.
But, I have never had cornbread as good as freshly ground and have not purchased meal since! It just taste sour to me now.

So buy dent corn and a grinder.

Dent corn in Mylar w/O2 Shelf life 25 yrs.

I1:)
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,662 Posts
Here's how I store cornmeal: Popcorn.

I have 100# of popcorn stored in 5-gallon buckets in mylar w/ O2 absorbers. It can be ground to make cornmeal, used for morale purposes (popcorn is, of course, popcorn), used to make grits--it's wonderful.

And it lasts a long, long time in its original form. I have a Country Living Grain Mill to grind it.

Thanks to MikeK for putting me on to this.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,236 Posts
When I was cooking in Restaurants I ordered 50 lb. bags of restaurant Quality cornmeal or corn flour. You can find a local restaurant that isn't a "chain" business, just a mom and pop style place and ask them to put a bag on their weekly order and offer them a couple of bucks extra for their trouble. You will be surprised how easy it is. When you get the bags, break them down in smaller portions and put the bags in the hot sun first to heat them up, then quickly freeze them in a chest or upright deep freeze. The quick double temperature shock will have a 100% effect on any unwanted visitors in the meal.
Your standard refrigerator doesn't have the ability to shock freeze anything you put into it, because it takes to long for it to recover from being opened and overcoming the room temperature food items placed inside it. The deep freezer has a deeper Cycle and better insulation to overcome temp. shock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Off topic I know, but only my Mom could make cornbread. :)

She grew up in rural America, and they browned a little bit of the corn meal in a skillet to add a toasted flavor, then added that to the recipe.

Try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,393 Posts
Don't Forget the Lime

I have read that it will last 8 months in a airtight container and up to 2 yrs in freezer. The #10 cans are rated @ 5yrs under perfect conditions.
The corn oil and germ will go rancid quickly and you can tell by just smelling.

I grew up w/beans and corn bread once a week(both of my parents were in their early teens during the Great Depression and my Dad always thought of it as a reminder of what he grew up with).
I still try to do at least once a month w/my family as a reminder of my Dad.
But, I have never had cornbread as good as freshly ground and have not purchased meal since! It just taste sour to me now.

So buy dent corn and a grinder.

Dent corn in Mylar w/O2 Shelf life 25 yrs.



Good idea to add a slaked lime pre-soak prior to the grind .... don't forget to stock a few sacks of lime ................................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Goose3,

I think you are absolutely right! The kernels store much longer than the ground down cornmeal, and it's cheaper! Buying whole kernels will give you more options for food preparation than storing only cornmeal which also has many options, but why limit yourself to only half of it's capability? Investing in a good grain mill would also serve many purposes and is a must have when preparing for TEOTWAWKI (The End of the World as We Know It).
 

·
You talkin' to me?
Joined
·
8,463 Posts
We store both whole corn for grinding and pre-ground corn meal and flour. The stuff that's already ground goes in the deep freeze for at least two weeks first, then stored. Rice, Beans, and Corn bread are always staples in my house, half the world lives on those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,421 Posts
Here's how I store cornmeal: Popcorn.

I have 100# of popcorn stored in 5-gallon buckets in mylar w/ O2 absorbers. It can be ground to make cornmeal, used for morale purposes (popcorn is, of course, popcorn), used to make grits--it's wonderfulf.

And it lasts a long, long time in its original form. I have a Country Living Grain Mill to grind it.

Thanks to MikeK for putting me on to this.
NOW I understand all the bulk pop corn at Costco. :cool: :thumb:
 

·
Super Gassy Moderator
Joined
·
66,290 Posts
Properly packaged, corn meal can last a long time in storage. That's why it's so common of a food with the long term storage companies. But you can get even longer storage life and FAR better nutrition and flavor by storing corn and grinding it as you need it. Same as comparing flour to fresh ground whole wheat berries.

Popcorn is easy to find in bulk and super cheap. And while it's generally considered to have too high of moisture for good long term storage, it stores fine anyway. And it makes some of the best tasting cornmeal you've ever tasted.
 

·
Outdoorsman and Hunter
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
Properly packaged, corn meal can last a long time in storage. That's why it's so common of a food with the long term storage companies. But you can get even longer storage life and FAR better nutrition and flavor by storing corn and grinding it as you need it. Same as comparing flour to fresh ground whole wheat berries.
Mike, I assume you mean by proper storage to be Mylar and O2 absorbers, but when you say "long time in storage" how long is that?

I keep wheat berries and whole corn, but I thought about also storing the corn meal and flour as well, but I am not sure how long those will hold, I mean how often I should be rotating through them, which will determine how much I can have any given time.
 

·
Super Gassy Moderator
Joined
·
66,290 Posts
Mike, I assume you mean by proper storage to be Mylar and O2 absorbers, but when you say "long time in storage" how long is that?

I keep wheat berries and whole corn, but I thought about also storing the corn meal and flour as well, but I am not sure how long those will hold, I mean how often I should be rotating through them, which will determine how much I can have any given time.
Mylar and O2 absorbers are the best way. I have used corn meal that was packed in #10 cans with O2 absorbers that was over 10 years old. It was just fine.

I'd still tend to keep corn meal and flour on a shorter rotation, since it's ground. I tend to figure 5 years on flour and 10 on corn meal. But that's just based on my own usage of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Corn has a lot of oil in it and won't keep as long as wheat, by far. It is super critical that its moisture content be below 10% when stored.

It is one of the foods which can develop botulism which grows in an oxygen-free environment, but which can't grow without enough moisture. Botulism can grow in improperly canned corn when the jar is also full of water.

I don't know how to test for moisture other than the simple digital tester we have at the farm. I also know how to weigh a bushel for moisture. I think some people can tell by pressing a fingernail into a kernel (I think that's how they used to do it), and I can do that with wheat berries.

I do know that when the moisture content is below 25% it won't pop open (like a pimple) when squeezed (like fresh corn on the cob will do) but I can't tell if it's 25% or 10% beyond that.

If someone has a "home remedy" for the test please post it. The digital tester is around $180.00.

If our tester says it's above 10%, I dry it in the oven for several hours at about 120 degrees and I can drop it from 25% to 10% in 2 or 3 hours even when it's in cake pans about 2" deep. I leave the oven door cracked to let moisture out. We do have a convection oven so there is air blowing from fans so I also don't know about other ovens.

For large batches we have a commercial continuous feed dryer, but we only get the moisture down to 12-14% for market, so I have to further dry it for long term storage.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top