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Jackpine Savage
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Never had pickled beetroot, we have normal canned beetroot slices. I hope we are talking about the same thing.

Yup we are, but it's eaten as small beets pickled as often as regular sliced here. My wife used to make regular beets with pineapple. Been a long time since she has for some reason, but that stuff was awesome. Hmmm guess what recipe she's gonna have to dig out soon?

ETA: Actually pickled beets is probably the most common way to eat them in the US.
 

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High Concept
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Mmmm no. I thought it was just pickled beets.
Different countries I guess. LOl
We cook corned silverside in water with an onion and 5 cloves.

Some people accidentally cook these as a pocket roast, if it’s not too salty it can be surprisingly nice.



Do you guys cook it that way.
 

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Jackpine Savage
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We used to have bully beef shepherds pie. Bully beef cooked with onions, peas, carrots and topped with mash and put in the oven. Had a very nostalgic aroma to it.

Bully beef dip made either pumpkin or sweet potato and curry or tomato relish. After a few pints people would palm a bread roll through it and jam that down their necks.

Bully beef sandwiches with beetroot slices was another one.

Bully beef and crackers with sliced tomato.

Many more.
One more question. Do you fry the beef for the beet sandwich, or do you just take it out of the can slice it and grab some bread and mayo?
 

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High Concept
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Yup we are, but it's eaten as small beets pickled as often as regular sliced here. My wife used to make regular beets with pineapple. Been a long time since she has for some reason, but that stuff was awesome. Hmmm guess what recipe she's gonna have to dig out soon?

ETA: Actually pickled beets is probably the most common way to eat them in the US.
We have beetroot in our burgers with the lot, and in Queensland a cooked pineapple slice is added.
 

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High Concept
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A lot of salt comes out of the beef when boiling, but vinegar added keeps the meat moist and tender.
 

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Jackpine Savage
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Bottom round cut of beef in your terminology.

Ok. All we corn here is brisket. If you want to go to the store and get deli sliced corned beef you get mechanically seperated mystery meat as far as I can tell. Same with canned corned beef.

Bottom round will cure nicely for bacon though. Brisket is what I normally use, but have found the bottom round to work well. English roast on the other hand the cure does not reach the center during the 10 day curing process.

While some people boil corned beef I always figured it was because they don't know how to cook. I've tried it a couple times and it just ain't right. Mine either go into the crockpot in the morning on the "keep warm" setting with some taters and onions and carrots, or they get pressure cooked or and this is the best, they get an overnight itialian dressing bath and then smoked with hickory or whatever your favorite down there would be.
 

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Jackpine Savage
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A lot of salt comes out of the beef when boiling, but vinegar added keeps the meat moist and tender.
You do realize that what you are picturing is not canned and can in no way be compared to canned along with shouldn't be included in a thread about a canned meat right? Fresh corned beef and canned are entirely different things and need to be treated as such.
 

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High Concept
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You do realize that what you are picturing is not canned and can in no way be compared to canned along with shouldn't be included in a thread about a canned meat right? Fresh corned beef and canned are entirely different things and need to be treated as such.
We call canned corned beef Bully Beef generally, and boiled salted silverside corned beef. Granddad used to eat bully beef in the trenches in WW1, when he went back to war in WW2 he was upset to find he was still eating the same old bully beef leftover from WW1. Governments have no imagination.

Anything you can do to make the canned stuff more interesting is welcome. Eating it cold out of the can would have gotten old fast, especially as it had a lot of solid salted fat around it.
 

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High Concept
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Salted mutton is another thing, but I reckon they would have been better off using goat, but people back the. didn’t want to go rounding them up over vast distances.
There’s nothing like salt bush fed goat, people are now growing salt bush just to feed it to animals to get the flavour. That dining experience was usually the preserve of remote workers.
 

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Deplorable Freedom Zealot
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My wife made us reuben sandwiches from a Great Value canned corned beef Friday night for a quick dinner.

Sat. morning for breakfast she sliced the rest into 3/8 inch slices, battered and lightly fried, in oil.

She then made a cream gravy in the pan, adding a little salted butter & black pepper.

She added no salt to gravy, as meat is already salty enough for us.

We put it on open faced homemade biscuits, and topped with gravy, scrambled eggs on side.

It was damn good too!

She said she made this for her son as divorced young mother.

I asked her why the hell she had not made for me over the last 30 years! LOL!
 

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Jackpine Savage
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She said she made this for her son as divorced young mother.

I asked her why the hell she had not made for me over the last 30 years! LOL!
I'll propose a theory.

Have you ever looked at cookbooks from WWII? They are full of substitutions and how best to use your ration cards. Times were hard and being able to put a decent meal on the table that only used what you could get, or that could be made very cheaply was something those women took pride in.

Afterwards as things got better those old meals would be pulled out here and there if the family was in a tight spot or maybe as a comfort food for the kids that grew up eating them, but they were no longer seen as something to be proud of. They had become a reminder of hard times or a sign of poverty.

That meal is probably something that reminds your wife of how hard it was being a single mom, and she probably takes pride in making you meals with "real meat" that sound and look a bit more appealing.
 

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High Concept
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I'll propose a theory.

Have you ever looked at cookbooks from WWII? They are full of substitutions and how best to use your ration cards. Times were hard and being able to put a decent meal on the table that only used what you could get, or that could be made very cheaply was something those women took pride in.

Afterwards as things got better those old meals would be pulled out here and there if the family was in a tight spot or maybe as a comfort food for the kids that grew up eating them, but they were no longer seen as something to be proud of. They had become a reminder of hard times or a sign of poverty.

That meal is probably something that reminds your wife of how hard it was being a single mom, and she probably takes pride in making you meals with "real meat" that sound and look a bit more appealing.
A bit like Mock Fish during rationing, didn’t have an ounce fish in it, but some swore they could taste it apparently, I could sort of imagine it being fish, so it was a good substitute actually. Funny how wartime recipes get handed down and eventually become a treat.
I was perusing the famous Country women’s association cookbook and found they improvised a great deal during the wars and interwar period editions.
 
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