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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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Still storing plain yellow corn meal...less and less every day in stores,especially the 5 lb bags
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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Exports double, mostly to china. Still soybeans by far most valuable ag export.
Soybeans/soy products gonna have a serious shortfall this year
 

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This is true if you look only over the last year. August 03 2020 the price was $3.08 a bushel. May 3, it was $6.80 a bushel. However if you go back to July 16 2012, it was $8.24 a bushel. Corn and Soy prices have been at lows over the last few years. It is almost pure supply and demand. I own a farm which grows Corn and Soy. Last year we couldn't even plant a corn crop, because of weather conditions. Soy bean price was low, and we had a negative net yield from the farm for the first time in many years.

Soy Beans: Sept '12 had a high of $17.38; April 26 this year it was $15.69, May 3 it was down a little at $15.24. I sold my beans last year for $9.60 which seemed pretty good at the time..since we had some years in the mid $8 range. It depends on export demand, weather in all parts of the World, including South American which has become a major competitor in the last few years.

Farming can be tough. The prices for fuel, chemicals and seed fluctuate, but are always there. The fixed costs rarely go down. Also one really needs to adjust prices for inflation if looking back historically. I have to make a prediction if we will get a better price by selling when the crop is brought in from the field, and we don't have to pay storage, or wait until a high (Often in May or even July) and pay storage fees. Some years the price in May is lower than it was in Sept!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oddly i was looking at bobs red mill 25# bag of medium grind cornmeal and at the old cash and carry its just over $18, over $10 less than the red mill website. Not sure how long that price has held but its been awhile, at least 6 months and likely longer. But this is a specialty non gmo corn, most corn is gmo and in us is mostly not even used as food even including hfcs. This is a whole grain product and very tasty but does not keep as well as degerminated cornmeal. This really should be in fridge or freezer for best results. Though i suspect restaurants use it fast enough not to bother.
 

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The Power of the Glave
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Just like so many other things, it's the context that's important.

Grain prices were at 15-year lows. 140% sounds like a lot. But all they've done is gone from the basement, to the ground floor. From losing money, to just slightly above break-even levels.

As a grain farmer, just wanted to put my take on this.
 

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Not a corn farmer, or any real farmer, but here is my question, are most of the farms so attached to the big AG boys that they cannot alter their crops to something else?
Or are we so hooked on those three that its impossible to grow anything else?
 

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I haven't noticed it at the feed store yet, cracked corn and two/three way scratch still near the same prices.
 

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Indefatigable
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I don't know where most of you live that you are seeing such high prices. Dried cracked corn, fresh corn, canned corn and cornmeal are all readily available with no prices increases that I have noticed in Tulsa.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That is weird. Why has market price of corn over doubled in last year while products we use from corn are pretty much the same?
 

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The Power of the Glave
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Not a corn farmer, or any real farmer, but here is my question, are most of the farms so attached to the big AG boys that they cannot alter their crops to something else?
Or are we so hooked on those three that its impossible to grow anything else?
It has nothing to do with "being attached to the big AG boys". That's a common misconception i.e. that Cargill, ConAgra, etc. dictate what farmers plant. Instead, it's mostly a question of economics and marketing.

Situations can vary by region. However here in Nebraska the vast majority of planted crops are corn and soybeans. There are economic reasons for this. And also "marketing" reasons. The state's large livestock industry and bio-fuels production provides a ready market for these two feed grains. They are also ready buyers, who are setup to handle and utilize these commodities.

Most farm equipment on farms are already purchased and designed to handle these specific crops, and little else. This machinery represents a huge investment for the farmer. Other crops would require different equipment. Again, a huge investment.

As an example: I could grow wheat in my area. However do to the soil, corn and soybeans produce better. Another factor is that none of the grain elevators within reasonable transportation distance around here purchase wheat (maybe a few might). So they aren't setup to handle and market it, as they do corn and soybeans.

"Alternative" crops are also problematic. Sure--I could grow something like organic sesame seed. But I would have to buy an entirely new line of equipment for this very specialized crop. And then there's the problem of marketing. Markets for "alternative" crops are frequently limited. Both in the number of customers and with regards to distance. I could maybe sell it in the Yuppie-haven of Omaha. However, Omaha is 100 miles away. And again, only a limited market for the stuff. The cost of hauling it there would be more than what I would get selling it. And just because something is "organic" doesn't necessarily mean people will pay through the nose for it.

A generation or two ago, in my area farmers (such as my Dad) used to plant quite a few acres to oats. And also such crops as red clover. However, they are hardly planted in my area today. Because farmers no longer have horses is one reason (oats was the primary feed for horses). And again--because of return on investment---corn and soybeans simply pay better.
 

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High Concept
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Don’t eat corn, it’s bad for you, and soy ...... well we all know it makes your testicles fall off.
 
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