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I think a lot of people are. Cast iron holds heat well, making it ideal for baking with coals or in an oven. I use a 'Dutch oven' depth bottom with a frying pan top [also out of cast iron] for making pot roast, which has to cook low and slow. Can't beat it for anything that takes time to cook.

Don't let that stop you from looking at quality stainless steel, however, if you're in a pan-buying mood. I have a Calphalon 'wok' shaped pan, an All-Clad frying pan, and a small Cuisinart frying pan, all are stainless inside and out with copper or aluminum cores, and they are great to cook in, easy to clean, and well worth the money ['course, I got all mine on sale and it was several years ago]. I also have a small stock pot, some brand with a glass lid, that makes excellent soup and stew. Same stainless inside and out, aluminum or copper core.

Revere ware and the like is good for boiling water [like if you want to cook some veggies], but I find that the heavier pots and pans are best for frying and making soups and stews, things that take longer to simmer.
 

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I use cast iron 99% of the time now. A well seasoned cast iron pot has all of the qualities of the more expensive cookware at a fraction of the cost. And they grow better with time.
I've tried Calphalon, along with many other expensive brands. I have a collection sitting in the cabinet. None of it cooks as well as the cast iron.

I wore out one Calphalon frying pan in a year. The finish is shot. I have a fair amount of stainless steel, commercial pans also. They are indestructible but do not have the nonstick surface that a well seasoned cast iron pan has. Some of my cast iron has been in the family for generations.
 

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I use cast iron 99% of the time now. A well seasoned cast iron pot has all of the qualities of the more expensive cookware at a fraction of the cost. And they grow better with time.
I've tried Calphalon, along with many other expensive brands. I have a collection sitting unused in the cabinet. None of it, cooks as well as the cast iron.

I wore out one Calphalon frying pan in a year. The finish is shot. I have a fair amount of stainless steel, commercial pans also. They are indestructible but do not have the nonstick surface that a well seasoned cast iron pan has. Some of my cast iron has been in the family for generations.
I'm with Maurepas. I have a couple expensive (e.g. $80/pan) Calphalon pans and one was ruined fairly quickly. I still use the other buy very infrequently, I have to baby it and have to keep it spotlessly clean. Food and oil residue building up on no-stick pans is what ruins it. I have a couple Mirro teflon coated pots that I still have but use infrequently. Everything is still serviceable but I can't bring myself to get rid of decent stuff until I have replacements.

That being said, I am almost strictly cast iron any more and only USA made cast iron. With all the quality and contamination issues with Chinese products, I don't trust anything from China that touches my food. I also have a stainless pot that I use almost daily. At some point (maybe next time I have to move) I plan on sending cookware that I don't/won't use anymore to Goodwill and replacing with stainless or cast iron. Cruise eBay for vintage Griswold, Erie and Lodge cast iron for some good American made stuff!
 

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http://www.richsoil.com/cast-iron.jsp

http://grandpappy.info/hcastirn.htm

There are 2 links I have found useful about Cast Iron. It is wonderful stuff and will last forever with a little care. To me, part of prepping is to get equipment that will last a long time, cast iron cookware is definately that.

I have a couple skillets, a griddle, 2 bread pans, a dutch oven and a muffin pan. Love them!
 

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Great links-thanks

I have almost no experience with cast iron cooking but it certainly makes sense to me. Since any heat source can be used and I'm assuming any food can be cooked in it I can see no other food preparation system that would equal it.

I bought a 12 inch Lodge Dutch oven yesterday plus a lid for a pan I already have and some other items.
 

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Just don't let the wife clean yer griddle then put it on the electric stove on high to dry. That loud crack is yer griddle splitting. I love the stuff, just wipe it out when done don't give it a scrubbing with the steel wool unless it has be neglected and rusted, in which case you need to re-season it after getting the rust off.
 

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I have cast iron cookware. I love it. When properly taken care of, it could last several lifetimes.

I use my dutch oven in a hot box to cook food slowly all day long. It's ready to eat when I get home from work.
 

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A hot box is nothing more than a box packed with an insulating material that has a space for the cooking vessel. The vessel has all the heat from primary cooking, and the insulation in the box holds that heat in to finish the cooking. The insulation could be anything from fiberglass to hay, to shredded newspaper.

-Sean
 

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Here is my collection, never owned anything else. I may be young but I'm not stupid, cast iron rocks!!! I ran out of space to srore them in my cabnets so I made this wall "plaque" to hold them and display them. Some of them are really old (grandparents) and they are really nice artwork for the kitchen. The board is a 4 x 5 piece of 1" pine board with 3" finishing nails for the hangers that the pots and pans rest on. There are deep pots nested over the pans that can be used as covers or pans under them, there are 16 pots and pans in all. They board is securely attached to the wall with wall anchors at each corner and in the center.

I have to finish oiling the wood to make it last longer and be more attractive, anyone have any ideas on what type of oil to use to finish it?
 

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Oooh... nice collection rncmomx2! I have some cast iron myself and love it! I'm always looking for new pieces, but haven't been able to find griddles yet (I'm too cheap to buy 'em new). I wish I had those three in the upper left corner of your picture (lucky girl!).

-Sean
 

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The one in the far left is a double sided griddle (smooth on one side and ribbed on the other side), the 2nd from the left is the top (also doubles as a griddle) for the 3rd roasting pan. I bought them at Gander Mountain they are Lodge pans, they double griddle was $24.00 and the other two came together for $30.00.
 

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My suggestion is to get a couple new lodge pans and then buy a couple old Griswold skillets from eBay or a yard sale.

The old Grisolds can have a truly amazing non-stick surface where eggs can slide off. They ae what Teflon tries to be.

I use my new (okay, 5 years old) Lodge skillet for cooking up meat and onions or hashbrowns and the old Griswolds for eggs and if I want to use only a very little grease in something. My dutch oven is a lodge, it works fine.
 

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Bleach blonde on fire :p
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My suggestion is to get a couple new lodge pans and then buy a couple old Griswold skillets from eBay or a yard sale.

The old Grisolds can have a truly amazing non-stick surface where eggs can slide off. They ae what Teflon tries to be.

I use my new (okay, 5 years old) Lodge skillet for cooking up meat and onions or hashbrowns and the old Griswolds for eggs and if I want to use only a very little grease in something. My dutch oven is a lodge, it works fine.
I have no problems with eggs sticking to my cast iron, never have. My eggs come off just as easily as teflon. I only season my pans around 1 time every 3 months to keep it going good. I hardly ever wash it (unless I have something sticky and won't wipe out easily), I wipe it out and then let it heat up in the oven to kill any bacteria from the food. I don't add extra fat to the foods I cook to cut back on cholesterol and fat content.
 
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