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small "l" libertarian
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I believe I have a good supply of food, some water, with a Berkey and a swimming pool for plenty more, some medical supplies, and a pretty good stash of ammo. I'm not completely satisfied with any of those supplies, but I believe they are all at least at a bare minimum level (except medical supplies, maybe).

However, it recently occurred to me that I don't really have much of a plan for cooking once the power goes out. We do have 2 cylinders for the propane grill, but really, that's about it. At nearly $50 a pop, I'm not sure that accumulating more of those is really the best solution, especially since it means that we have to cook outside.

So, what are some cooking solutions you guys use? For things that require a supply of fuel, please indicate how much fuel you believe would need to be stored.
 

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There's really no good way to prepare cooked food in doors when the power goes out other than if you own a gas stove and of course if the gas is still flowing.

I suppose a good camp stove may work as long as it is well ventilated, but they are honestly supposed to be used outdoors as well. I have two camp stoves. A small one that runs on liquid fuel, and a large propane one. As of now, I have 3 gallons of coleman fuel, but if the power goes out for a really extended period then I can use the gasoline in my car for fuel as well. This may be a good option for you too.

Here's a link to check out LINK

This is the best way I can think to be able to store large amounts of fuel in my particular situation as I live in a townhouse.
 

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CHEERS :p
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We don't cook over wood but we have the ability to do so. We heat with wood in winter and last year we used about 9 cords of wood, so in reality if we cook while we heat we can safely say that 9-10 cords of wood a year would suffice
 

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I have 2 Colman multi fuel stoves as well as 10 gallons of Colman fuel, I also have a wood stove I could use, In the backyard I have a big BBQ pit as well as a wood fired oven and a smoker. I currently only have about a half cord of hard wood but that is looking to change because my father in law is replanting half of his cherry orchard and ha has given me all of the wood that I can cut. We will start right after the cherry season this year.
 

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Solar Oven
Camping Stove
Can Stove
Barbeque

A very hot bonnet/hood of a car will cook eggs

Dig a pit and put hot stones in the bottom, cover in grass lay food on top, more grass, then seal in with earth and leave to cook

A volcanic Geezer will cook food (ie boil) but I think you have to watch the sulphur.

Those volcanic pools (ie New Zealand) probably cook well, but again have to look for sulphur and the like.

Electric - Microwave, kettle, stove, chipper

Gas - Stove, Boil, Roast, fry

There are also foods that cook, ie fish with an acid will cook through.
 

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Mother nature solves all your problems :) Mud ovens, ftw!!http://www.treehugger.com/files/2005/06/make_your_own_m.php (Ignore all the "think green" stuff, just look at the article on how to build the oven)
Also charcoal pits are easy(A pit + charcoal + fire), campfires are always classic.
You can get a cardboard box in the summer, line it with aluminum foil and set a pot inside it for an hour and a half and cook whatevers inside.
Smokehouse is a very distinct possibility.

I think you can achieve pretty much anything with a small area devoted to a campfire, or an open brick-grill(Basically a brick box with a grill on top). Just get some cast iron cookware and you're good to go.
 

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Power outages -- 1 to 3 days...you will be fine with your bbq & propane or a general camping stove.

SHTF: Once other people run out of food -- and smell yours, that will become a problem. I have a 2 burner alcohol stove (many boats have these in the little kitchenettes down below). It is NOT as dangerous as cooking with a coleman indoors (as some people on here plan on doing)...and by dangerous I am talking about properly using the propane, etc. With an alcohol stove...there aren't really any fumes and it's pretty much idiot proof if you get the stove with the burners. It looks similar to a 2 burner coleman stove....just without the hassel.

Just a thought for those who are planning on bugging in and not being too obvious with their preps after an extended period of time.
 

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This site shows how to build a mud oven..it's really nice. Can see step by step. They did a very nice job. Probably won't look this nice if you are making after the fact but if you want to make one before the shtf. After, who cares what it looks like as long as it cooks food :) I just thought this was rather nice looking...

http://www.geocities.com/mosesrocket/
 

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Unlocked and loaded
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Cooking,

I plan to use a coleman duo fuel and barter and trade for fuel to cook with while cooking large pots of food to feed those who wish to trade with me. I have the security figured out, so no unwanted guests will pop in. :) The security gets fed also. :D:

If ya smell something good to eat, come on in , just announce your self, and we will sit down and Barter. Good luck and God bless.
 

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I would like to point all of those who live in populated areas and are considering using wood as a fuel source to a country that already tried this: Haiti.

There is not one single tree in that country. If you live near an urban or suburban center, I doubt the trees would last that long.
 

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I have a wood cook stove, with a warming chamber. DH made a tripod that you can suspend a dutch oven from, above a camp fire. We have a double barreled smoker, grills that require charcoal, gas or wood and an oven above our Barbeque pit. We have the solar cookers and know how to roast a pig in the ground. There are just so many options just think outside the box. If people follow the smell well we have to eat so we will handle that if the time comes. I got one cooker we just bought, it's a table top grill and it is at Walmart right now for just 15.00. Where there's a will there is a way.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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As foraging teacher I am a huge advocate of mesolithic cooking, that is, learning to cook like a cave man. Yes I have a few solar ovens, and gas, and wood et cetera but... learning to cook all your food without pots and pans is the base line, the survival line. Anything more than that is gravy.
 

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I, too, live in AZ and recently bought a solar oven from www.solarovens.org. $135 + $33 shipping ($23 extra if you want a reflector). Mine just shipped, can't wait for it to get here so I can try it out!

Since it's so bloomin' hot here for 6 months of the year, I figure that I might as well cook w/this solar oven most of the time...will help keep my electric bill down (no more hot stove/oven to heat the house up).
 

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Power outages -- 1 to 3 days...you will be fine with your bbq & propane or a general camping stove.

SHTF: Once other people run out of food -- and smell yours, that will become a problem. I have a 2 burner alcohol stove (many boats have these in the little kitchenettes down below). It is NOT as dangerous as cooking with a coleman indoors (as some people on here plan on doing)...and by dangerous I am talking about properly using the propane, etc. With an alcohol stove...there aren't really any fumes and it's pretty much idiot proof if you get the stove with the burners. It looks similar to a 2 burner coleman stove....just without the hassel.

Just a thought for those who are planning on bugging in and not being too obvious with their preps after an extended period of time.

I have built a couple of alcohol stoves out of aluminum cans and they are very fuel efficent. I can boil 16 oz of cold water with less than an oz of denatured alcohol. you acn buy the denatured alcohol fuel in the paint section at wal-mart for a few buck a quart. You can cook inside with no fumes and it is very samll package if you ahve to bug out.

Go to youtube.com and search for alcohol stove. You will be amazed at how many options are out there.
 

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small "l" libertarian
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I, too, live in AZ and recently bought a solar oven from www.solarovens.org. $135 + $33 shipping ($23 extra if you want a reflector). Mine just shipped, can't wait for it to get here so I can try it out!

Since it's so bloomin' hot here for 6 months of the year, I figure that I might as well cook w/this solar oven most of the time...will help keep my electric bill down (no more hot stove/oven to heat the house up).
Thanks for all the replies, but especially this one. As a valley resident, taking advantage of the incredibly hot sun sounds ideal, and it doesn't require any fuel. Most of my food stores are rice and beans, so this should cook that nicely.

I'll probably also pick up a couple more propane canisters, as well as a camp stove and some fuel- one that runs on gas that can be siphoned from the cars is a good idea, as long term storage of fuels can be difficult and dangerous, if you're storing a lot.

The multi-pronged approach will make it so that I should be able to do most of my cooking in the solar oven, and supplement it with other methods for when something needs more intense heat. I think I like that idea.

I hadn't considered the problem of the smell. If my neighbors aren't prepared, then that would almost guarantee them coming over to beg, and make lying about my supplies difficult. Any suggestions?

My primary security plan is secrecy. I figure if nobody knows I have food, most will leave me alone. Cooking outside kind of screws that up.

ETA: mom2bugnbooboo, if you wouldn't mind, please write up a review of your oven after you've had a chance to try it a few times.
 

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wok

Assuming you have:

a wok

a little cooking oil

a few small pieces of kindling

And assuming you have already cut up your raw food into small thin pieces and you have a place to make a small fire, then you make the fire.

When the flames are licking the bottom of the wok, it will only take a very few minutes to cook.

This takes practice, but when it's done efficiently, a Chinese peasant can make lunch for her fellow field workers before the flames die out.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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I, too, live in AZ and recently bought a solar oven from www.solarovens.org. $135 + $33 shipping ($23 extra if you want a reflector). Mine just shipped, can't wait for it to get here so I can try it out!

Since it's so bloomin' hot here for 6 months of the year, I figure that I might as well cook w/this solar oven most of the time...will help keep my electric bill down (no more hot stove/oven to heat the house up).
I'm in central Florida and use mine year round. I cook at least two meals a week in it including whole chickens, roasts, lamb shanks et cetera. It is moist cooking which takes some adaptation.
 

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Hi all

I believe I have a good supply of food, some water, with a Berkey and a swimming pool for plenty more, some medical supplies, and a pretty good stash of ammo. I'm not completely satisfied with any of those supplies, but I believe they are all at least at a bare minimum level (except medical supplies, maybe).

However, it recently occurred to me that I don't really have much of a plan for cooking once the power goes out. We do have 2 cylinders for the propane grill, but really, that's about it. At nearly $50 a pop, I'm not sure that accumulating more of those is really the best solution, especially since it means that we have to cook outside.

So, what are some cooking solutions you guys use? For things that require a supply of fuel, please indicate how much fuel you believe would need to be stored.
I have a propane grill as you do, with 2 cylinders; a camping stove with about 2 dozen propane little cylinders; and a solar oven.

I just bought the solar oven about 2 months ago and love it. It's portable, it slow cooks food, and in the summer it doesn't heat up your house just so you can a/c to cool it down.

Of course it does require the sun, and a good sunny day. There have been a few days that I have roasts thawed, and stews made and it was cloudy.

I bought the biggest one (holds to 2 3-qt pots) and the reflectors for around $200 that included shipping. Shop around for the best price, but I felt that was a good way to save on propane rather than trying to cook everything on the grill or camp stove.

http://www.solarovens.org/buy.html

You might also be able to build one.
 
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