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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the trick? I always seem to have hard one's even after cooking several hours. I want to store long term peas and beans but want to be able to eat them when I cook them. I would love all of the help and suggestions I can get here.


Thanks
HH54r
 

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Soak them first. They will begin to sprout overnight. This causes the release of enzymes that make them easier to cook and..... easier to digest... less gas.
 

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When you soak them (at least overnight or 8 hours) be sure to pour off that water and cook them in fresh water with some added salt. Like pasta, if you don't salt them during cooking, it's hard to get them salty enough afterwards.
 

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Beans take a lot of simmering to soften. The higher altitude you are, the longer they take. There are some shortcuts though. Soaking overnight is a common one. You can also bring them to a boil, let them sit in their hot water for an hour, then finish simmering them.

The best time and fuel savers revolve around a pressure cooker though. A pressure cooker will make short work of soaked beans and shave a lot of time off non-soaked ones.

If you want to save even more fuel, which might be critical for some of us during a SHTF situation, make yourself an insulated pot cozy. Google "retained heat cooking" and "haybox" for some ideas. Combine retained heat cooking with a pressure cooker and you can cook a pot of beans with very little fuel. Bring it to pressure and set it in the insulation to finish cooking by retained heat.

A small pressure cooker that will make one meals worth for your family is a great way to go in a situation where you might not be able to refrigerate leftovers. It also cooks them faster and requires a smaller insulated cozy for retained heat cooking.
 

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I've cooked beans, etc for many years and a couple of things I always do have been mentioned; soak them overnight first and pour the water off next day (this water can be given to the chickens or used to water your plants- get used to not throwing water out). Simmer them in fresh water to which you've added a tsp or so of baking soda, until they are almost as soft as you'd want them (this could take a few hours), THEN add any sugars (if you add sugar before the beans are soft, they may never get soft enough) your recipe call for.

I use most of my beans, peas and lentils in soups so I just throw a handful into the broth, simmer for a few hours, add garlic and pepper, and voila! ...soup. Grate a bit of hard cheese on top, cut up that loaf of artisan bread you just made..yummy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all for the great replies. This has bugged me for a while and I will try the afore mentioned ideas. I knew there was a reason I liked this site. Again,
Thanks for the good ideas.

As Always
Randy
HH54r

BTW Grandma, being trained by my dad 1929 Ohio Farm Baby. We waste nothing here. Good tip though, others wont consider this.
 
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pressure cookers and crock pots are also good for cooking beans. throw them on the night before (after you've soaked them) and let them cook, like a pot roast...

with a pressure cooker, it's easier to cook everything- meat, beans, rice, etc. 20 minutes & rice is done & doesn't taste like cardboard, like minute rice does.. maybe need a bit longer for beans.

i mix beans & lentils in my rice sometimes when i cook it via pressure cooker... it's a good way to get some extra fiber and protein amongst all the carbs & it's quite tasty. :)

i do equal amounts of:

white rice (i like short grain, jasmine rice or basmati.. but whatever you have)
brown rice
misc. grain (quinoa, wild rice [yes, i know it's really a grass], amaranth, millet, corn, barley- wouldn't advise using oats or wheat, though)
misc. grain (same as above, just pick a different grain- if you use quinoa, try using something else, like barley, wild rice, etc- whatever sounds good to you)
lentil or bean of choice - i wouldn't use pinto beans, simply because i don't like how they taste.. but if you do, then go for it!


soak the beans over night. when ready to cook them, wash the rice (if required), put grains & beans in pressure cooker, fill with appropriate amount of water (probably an inch or two above the rice/bean mixture) & cook for 20-30 minutes.

if you want to eat it as a meal, add whatever flavor of bouillon you prefer & whatever seasonings you like before you close the lid on the pressure cooker, that way they're absorbed by the grains & beans. goes great with anything. - you can even add meat in there if you want to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey,
Lots of great ideas and a coule of great links. Thansk for all the help folks. I have already tried the crock pot and the apple juice.

Thanks to you all.

HH54r
 

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I've got to agree with the above. Soak them at least overnight and then throw out that water and cook them in new water.

edit: don't add the salt until they are mostly done cooking.
 
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