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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a pair of 20' high cubes that I want to cover (set apart at 20'). I have found Shield Roof Solutions online. Not sure if I'm allowed to post a link, but I will do so below. If it goes against forum rules, please let me know.

Models | Shield

Does anyone know of this company? I'd have them ship a package to Hawaii, so I'd like to get a sense of their reputability.

The systems themselves look good. I like the GB36HZ, which is their high wind, no snow version, ideal for my climate/wind profile.
 

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You have to be kidding.
Massively overpriced, and then you have to pay to ship them to Hawaii?

There's nothing there that a local builder couldn't put together for maybe $1k in the lower 48, so maybe a couple or three grand in Hawaii.

Another thing - I don't know how strict your building codes are there, but from the pictures, those roofs don't look like something that would pass inspection here. Might want to check on that, too. Show them to your local code enforcement office.
 

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Wow $8700 for just a roof? That is pricy. Here on main land big box stores can get you 20' lumber. Give one side a bit of lift, this could be done with the foundation of the container or on the container and you could have a roof way cheaper.
 

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Pisticus Veritas
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I have a pair of 20' high cubes that I want to cover (set apart at 20'). I have found Shield Roof Solutions online. Not sure if I'm allowed to post a link, but I will do so below. If it goes against forum rules, please let me know.

Models | Shield

Does anyone know of this company? I'd have them ship a package to Hawaii, so I'd like to get a sense of their reputability.

The systems themselves look good. I like the GB36HZ, which is their high wind, no snow version, ideal for my climate/wind profile.
Based on the prices I might consider just standard wood framed trusses, plywood, and metal sheeting. Not sure what the prices for materials are these days though. Maybe you WOULDN'T save money??
 

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Only thing to possibly justify the price is that they put a wind speed rating on those roofs. But for the money, I would buy a third container, cut it up and make my own roof from the side and top panels. The bottom section would make a nice deck or bridge across my (required) moat.
 

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Padre in the woods
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Pricing aside, I would be concerned about the stresses and loads. I would like to see what a PE would say about the loads.
 

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Mobile homes often have to be anchored to the ground. Trusses would need steel brackets i imagine with more than just screws.
 

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11/2 years ago I could buy a 26x26 carport beefed up for heavy snow load
rear and side walls enclosed , 9’ wall night
with installation. On site . 7500 bucks that is crazy expensive Even with the covid money added on
 

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Some years back, I helped a buddy get his mini hanger ready for a new roof. The roof had to be to Southern Arizona Codes and also use a lot of common sense. What the contractors came up with, was a foam roof...foam as in some kind of gas injected polly foam like Styrofoam. The frame is all steel with a really light weight stiff plastic covering. You can NOT walk on it, only balance on the frame sections. We used hot wire cutting technology: A length of NyChrome wire stretched between spring loaded arms at the end of poles and then energized with a lot of amps. That wire would glow red hot. We just sort of raked the old foam off.

Then some company came in with a boom truck with an operator at the top in a basket. They would spray this stuff on that looked like white soup but it would foam up and then harden. The hard part was laying the layers on evenly so they would all lay flat together. They used Hot Wires too, to trim the edges.

The most interesting thing about it, was what he told me about another job that he did. That one was kind of out there in the boonies. They sprayed the roofing on in big overlaps and rough edges and here's maybe the neatest part: The boom operator would sit up there in his padded chair with a power assisted sprayer (It had to be power assisted because of the volume and pressures it sprayed at) and play a tune with the color levers! Oh yeah! They could alter the color in mid spray without even slowing down. Perfect camouflage for a cabin in the boonies!
 

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Suppliers who sell roof trusses have computer programs that can design and price a roof to your specifications. Here, they do it at no charge for simple designs. Take your measurements and specifications and get them to give you a quote.
 

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WAAAAAAY overpriced. Those are not at all complicated or sophisticated designs; no crazy materials or the like.

I would look elsewhere. Heck, you might be able to find a fabricator locally for far less.
 

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Suppliers who sell roof trusses have computer programs that can design and price a roof to your specifications. Here, they do it at no charge for simple designs. Take your measurements and specifications and get them to give you a quote.
the problem with that is how you transfer the load to the 4 corners of the container- you need your own beam bolted to the container to resist uplift.
 

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Padre in the woods
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Consider what windload might produce, bother in the horizontal and vertical plane. You can mitigate some of that if the roofing is attached to the top with no gaps between the container and roof structure. That is, no way for high winds to get under the roof an leverage up. While these are nice premade, (at a cost), it would be better to have a PE with skill in environmental loads perhaps design a steel truss system, which then you populate with the proper roofing material.

For example, where I will be moving to, you have to figure snow loads. Newly fallen snow in calm conditions weighs 3.12 to 4.37 pounds, while 1 cubic foot of damp new snow weighs 6.24 to 12.49 pounds. Think of the downward load on a 20' x 10' surface. And that roof can't bend for integrity. But if you have a winter of 100" of snow....

Then there are the loads cause by 60-90 mph wind which press horizontally, as well as find a gap, or pocket which they can leverage to provide upward momentum.

I'm not trying to discourage you from this endevor, but just think the design over real good, and maybe consult with a PE. I've known several people who have had disasters with the assumption that a container could be buried and topped with earth, or could have a simple roof placed on top. You typically don't hear about the problems as in prepping and off grid situations its not something reported in the news cycle. But, assumptions have lead to accidents both bothersome and fatal.
 

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That would typicaly fall into the "uplift" category. I also think the containers walls could hold quite a bit of weight. I believe the rating for the 20ft is roughly 40,000lbs. Not for a few hundred pound roof spread out over the whole 20'.
 

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Wind is a big one also ,Ive done this a few times , 2 containers high
the containers where welded and we had a I beam on the inside with footings and 4 posts there where 2 barn doors on each side , the top container had steps going up from the back
but it was not good space so the next one was just one container with 4‘ walls and smaller roof , we had the same beams on the inside with posts and barn doors .
The guy fix’s trucks in side. A 20 span seams to work good .
Building Shade Grass Biome Rectangle
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Appreciate everyone's input.

My handyman skills are limited, and I cannot build a custom roof over these containers myself. That leaves me with two options. Pay a local contractor to build one with lumber and metal roofing. Or buy a kit, which I should be able to assemble myself.

I have reached out to local building supply store for a quote for wooden gables. I suspect the gables alone will be as much as this kit. And getting a contractor to frame it up and top it with metal roofing would probably be another $10k.

Metal fabricators on island are ridiculously expensive. A basic farm gate is over $2,000 alone. And I'm talking a very basic design using 4" square tubing. And they wouldn't build anything like this without an engineer drawings, which would just add to the cost.

If you've never built in Hawaii, you cannot imagine how costly materials and labor are.

As for loads, it is all rain and wind (including hurricanes). One of ShieldUps kits has a hurricane rating. It is more expensive, but supposedly rated to withstand up to 180mph. That seems way high to me. But even if it's only able to handle 125 mph, that's plenty. We are on the leeward side of the Big Island, and very unlikely to have a direct hit, as there's two 13,000 ft volcanoes that will either block or break up any big storm.
 
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