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Survival Instructor
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Discussion Starter #1
Wanted to share a series of videos I just made about my absolute favorite trap in the world. It is absolutely stupid proof and puts more food on the table than any other trap I have tried. They are extremely cheap at 4-12$ a piece you can't go wrong and they last almost forever. Very lightweight for bug out bags. Check this video series out and tell what kind of sets you employ and what are your favorite lightweight modern trap!





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqHjND6laBM
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I've had very good luck with the small #110 conibars and I keep a few #220 for animals the size of *****. I have no doubt the larger #330s would be effective of beaver, but they are much, much higher priced.

Most of the time I prefer to use a 1 1/2 coil spring leg hold trap. Steel traps are cheap for the amount of animals (food) they catch.
 

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I like conibears. They work great for beaver, mink, and marten. 330s are also good for wolverine.

However, if you are trying to catch a fox, coyote, or wolf you will have a much tougher time.

For a SHTF scenario I much prefer snares. You can make snares from scavanged wire in a pinch. If you learn to use snares before you need them, you will be confident when the bad stuff comes.

Snares work for everything from squirrels to moose. They are illegal for most game animals so check your regs before using them. But they are a great tool.

The way we use conibears for beaver in Alaska is to slip the loop holes that are on the end of the springs over a dry pole so that the trap stands out from the pole. Then wire a small bunch of willow or poplar branches in the center of the trap so that none of the branches extends beyond the jaws. Then set the trigger about 1/3 way up from the bottom so that the beaver will hit it with its nose when biting the branches. Slip the pole in the hole through the ice and jam it into the mud in the bottom. It's best to make sure that it's far enough below the ice so that the beaver does not float up and freeze to the bottom of the ice after it's caught. That set is almost 100% productive for me.
 

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Conibear traps are pretty awsome. I have a dozen of the 110's and 220's and 4 of the 330's. The 220's are by far the ones that get the most use. I generally set these in a bucket set using a 5 gallon bucket with a couple of slots cut in it to hold it in place. The lids have a hole cut in them about the size of the trap. I usually bait the buckets with a can of sardines or some fish guts after cleaning a stinger full of fish. This works great for ***** which is mainly what I target when I set out traps. The 330's I use mainly for Coyotes which are rather plentiful around here. The 110's get little use and are mainly kept around for SHTF type situation when food is limited.

BTW...great vids you cranked out there!
 

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Survival Instructor
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169 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The 330's are much more expensive. The traps I talk about in the series are the 110's and 220's because they are light enough to carry in a bug out bag. Don't need the larger conibears, because I can use snares for larger game!
 
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