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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know how to set up my 3 point hitch while bush hogging. Everybody I've ever talked to said to make sure the hitch is in the "float position", and I guess I thought that was making sure the pin isn't in the arms so that it can go from side to side if needed. However, this makes me miss some weeds sometimes. I thought maybe it was talking about a lift position, but I can't find any information about where a float position on the lift lever on a Ford 4630 is, or if it's part of the draft control, or what. Can somebody help? How am I supposed to pull this thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Float means it follows the ground contour. My JD tractor has a lever to raise and lower the 3 point hitch. Down lowers it, up raises it, and in the middle position is float.

Edit: your may operate differently, but floats means to follow the ground contour.
My lever is position sensing... down is all the way down, all the way up is all the way up, and in the middle it's in the middle. I don't have an up and down lever, I have a position control lever, the lift goes where I set the lever. I guess that's why I don't know what the float position is, I'm not entirely sure there is one.

Just to clarify, should the pins be in the linkage for the lift arms so it can't sway side to side?
 

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I run my bush hog on the ground. I have a JD5410, I set my 3 point lever all the way down and let the hog drag behind me. it flops from side to side a bit in turns and if you're on the side of a hill it will go to the end of the 3 pt hitch play. I just let mine drag on the hog rails on the ground. My 3 pt hitch will float up and down as needed, it's not a locking hydraulic.

As for the pins being in the linkage, I keep mine (the side bars) locked so they won't get into my tires going side to side but with enough slack i can get my equipment on and off easily. Plus, with a little slack from side to side, if I hit something with the hog or get in a bind, it can jump off it without getting into the tractor or tearing up the pto.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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I don't know how to set up my 3 point hitch while bush hogging. Everybody I've ever talked to said to make sure the hitch is in the "float position", and I guess I thought that was making sure the pin isn't in the arms so that it can go from side to side if needed. However, this makes me miss some weeds sometimes. I thought maybe it was talking about a lift position, but I can't find any information about where a float position on the lift lever on a Ford 4630 is, or if it's part of the draft control, or what. Can somebody help? How am I supposed to pull this thing?
I assume your hog has rear wheels. Set the height you want to cut by adjusting the wheels and adjust the 3pt hitch to make to hog cut level.

If you have proud stumps or rocks you might want to set the hog high enough to go over the top, but be careful. Catching the front on the hog on a stump is much preferable to catching it with the blade.
 

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On my tractor the float was an option that I didn't get. It works by sensing pressure on the top link and raising or lowering the lift arms. At least I think thats what I saw in the manual.

I just set the bush hog level and adjust it when needed. Its a hog not a finishing mower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I assume your hog has rear wheels. Set the height you want to cut by adjusting the wheels and adjust the 3pt hitch to make to hog cut level.
I've got the height down... my cutter has slots for the top link so it rides up and down with no problem. I'm concerned with what to do for side to side, by selecting the pins in the lift arm linkage. I thought leaving it out was considering the float position, since they could float back and forth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On my tractor the float was an option that I didn't get. It works by sensing pressure on the top link and raising or lowering the lift arms. At least I think thats what I saw in the manual.
I think that's what is called the draft control and is different than the float. Ford invented it, the top link does something to a valve when extra pressure is put on it, and it in turns lifts the lift arms. It was made for things like disking, and basically saves fuel more than anything else, probably keeps you from getting hung up and saving time as well. Basically if you're disking along and your disk gets hung in the muck, instead of vainly chugging along at the same rate, your top link senses this, and the lift arms lift up so your disk doesn't dig as deep.


I just set the bush hog level and adjust it when needed. Its a hog not a finishing mower.
Yeah but like I said in the previous response, it's not the levelness that I'm concerned with, just not sure what to do on the side to side action. What's happening is that I can sometimes miss big strips of vegetation even though it ought to be overlapping so apparently leaving the pins out is wrong. I have two more options, pinning it down so it can't go anywhere, or putting it in a position that lets it go back and forth a couple inches instead of several like leaving them out does.
 

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I think that's what is called the draft control and is different than the float. Ford invented it, the top link does something to a valve when extra pressure is put on it, and it in turns lifts the lift arms. It was made for things like disking, and basically saves fuel more than anything else, probably keeps you from getting hung up and saving time as well. Basically if you're disking along and your disk gets hung in the muck, instead of vainly chugging along at the same rate, your top link senses this, and the lift arms lift up so your disk doesn't dig as deep.




Yeah but like I said in the previous response, it's not the levelness that I'm concerned with, just not sure what to do on the side to side action. What's happening is that I can sometimes miss big strips of vegetation even though it ought to be overlapping so apparently leaving the pins out is wrong. I have two more options, pinning it down so it can't go anywhere, or putting it in a position that lets it go back and forth a couple inches instead of several like leaving them out does.

On the side to side, you don't want it flopping. At least on my kubota, if you leave the pins out the lift arms hit the tires and damage them.

Back to the draft part, I forgot what it was called and wondered how you could use it on and mower.:)
 

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Your tractor manual will tell you how to use the draft/position control. Draft is only for soil engaging implements, like bottom plows and chisel plows. A valve in the top (center) link senses when increased down pressure is applied as the plow is "sucked" into the ground and corrects by applying up pressure, theoretically maintaining a consistent depth no matter if the soil is hard or soft. Ford did not invent draft control. Harry Ferguson invented it, and Henry Ford stole it after their infamous "handshake" deal.

Your tractor probably has two levers controlling up and down on the 3ph, a "draft" lever and a "position control" lever. They are used in conjunction with each other when plowing. When using an implement that does not engage the soil, like your bush hog, the draft lever is placed (I think) all the way down, and the position control is used to set the height of the mower. On some older Ford tractors, there is actually a lever on the transmission cover that is changed back and forth when changing from a plow to a mower.

You said you had the up/down adjustment pretty well under control, anyhow. You need to use the pins to adjust the mower so it has just a little latarel movement. It doesn't need to have free movement, because that can put some heavy loads on the arms and chains, possibly doing some damage. That mower is a heavy piece of equipment, and when it shifts suddenly from one extreme to the other, it creates quite some momentum. It doesn't need to be rigid, either, so set the pins so there is "just a little" lateral play.

By the way, the "float" position would be with the draft control out of the picture, and the position control all the way down, or almost all the way, anyhow. Remember, the 3ph has no downward pressure. What keeps the plow in the ground is a combination of how it is set, and the weight of the implement. What keeps the mower on the ground is the weight of the implement, and lack of up pressure from the position control.

There are some people at www.tractorbynet.com who probably do a better job of explaining this.
 

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Just to clarify, should the pins be in the linkage for the lift arms so it can't sway side to side?
Yes, they should. You should also tighten up the arms so that they can't sway from side to side.




The lift arm (circled) should go over the pin/bolt on your bush hog, then be held in place with a safety pin. Then, you should tighten the chains/turnbuckles (black arrow) to prevent the implement from swaying excessively side to side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On the side to side, you don't want it flopping. At least on my kubota, if you leave the pins out the lift arms hit the tires and damage them.
I guess that's why I was confused, mine doesn't go all the way over, it's limited. It can go back and forth 6-8" but that's about it, it can't hit the tires. Probably hard on the arm joints to do that now that I think about it.
 

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I have a MF165. When bush hogging, the three point will slowly drift up or down. I set my lift lever all the way up, then lower the bush hog with the draft lever to the desired cut height, and it will hold that position. My "theory" is that the pump is constantly trying to lift the implement but the draft is bypassing the pressure at a certain point so it holds position.
 
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