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boringly normal
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Discussion Starter #1
I admit, I have never really stocked condiments - they never felt important enough. I thought, in an emergency - who cares if the ketchup runs out, right? We've bought extra on sale, but that is not stocking, really.

This emergency though, is a slow moving train wreck. I have time to think and plan - which is nice, though I won't be surprised to learn I develop my first ever blood pressure problem. Anyway -

Condiments. Trying to get a backup (or two) for every spice, mustard, hot sauce and pickle that lives in the fridge or spice cabinet has amazed me, and hurt my wallet.

To (finally) get to my point - can folks share their spice and condiment tricks and suggestions for dealing with the 'rice again' whine I know will be coming from my teen? And maybe post some condiment/spice suggestions?

Thanks in advance. :thumb:
 

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Cayenne pepper and brown sugar. We use those a lot especially when smoking ribs and pork loins.

Black pepper - get the peppercorns and a grinder.

This is just me but I'd stock up on what I use the most. Mrs. AZ_HighCountry gets a lot of it on the clearance rack at the grocery or dollar stores.
 

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The Mrs. has insisted on bullion, lots and lots of bullion. Both in liquid and cubed form, vegetable, beef, and chicken.

She'll drop in a cube when she cooks rice and it comes out quite flavorful.

She uses the liquid stuff on just about everything else.

I'm big on mustard myself. You'd be surprised at all the things mustard will spice up. When I was little my Great Aunt taught me to add mustard to soup. Seemed crazy, but sure enough mustard makes any soup I've put it in "pop" with flavor.

Of course we have a very large supply of salt/pepper. I was just mentioning the odd stuff.
 

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That'll be the day...
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I admit, I have never really stocked condiments - they never felt important enough. I thought, in an emergency - who cares if the ketchup runs out, right? .......
My exact mentality for the past 5 years.

But...... COVID has brought the wife, squarely into the conversation and effort, when before..... she would simply ask, "do we have emergency food"?

Three trips to Sam's Club the past three weeks and she has handed me a list every time. I look at it and think.... "If we are really in a SHTF scenario, are you really going to care if you have powdered creamer for your coffee? ****... be thankful you have coffee!"

The past two weeks.... this has happen several times.......

Phone rings. Wife on the other end, either driving to work or driving home from work. She asks... "Are you going to Sams Club today? Good, I want you to buy 5 big boxes of Tampons and 6 cases of toilet paper."

Phone rings. Wife asks.... How much ammo do we have? Do we have enough?

Phone rings. Wife asks.... Have you purchased enough over the counter meds?


But the past 5 days, the questions have been around spices/seasonings, condiments, coffee, creamer, etc........ "Hey babe, why don't you buy a case of Hoisin Sauce that is in those little glass jars that will last a long time on the shelf. That will make the rice taste so much better."

Its like an analogy of going Camping .... or going Glamping.


.........

........
 

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BASS
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2,094 Posts
Spices and foods are stocked and increasing. Two things I have stocked I haven't seen listed: flour and yeast.

If COVID-19 hits the US very bad or just bad in your area you probably will be quarantined or "just not going shopping". You will want bread. You can't depend on people shopping for you. Bread is a basic food.

I continue to stock OTC Flu Meds. If you or a loved one gets the flu you will want meds to help make you/them more comfortable. Cough and sore throat meds will help. A pharmacist told me to get TYLENOL Cold & Flu. I am also getting more DayQuill and Nyquill and cough drops. Tell your Pharmacists what drugs you are taking. I will also buy electrolyte drinks. Plastic bags to contain any tissues and paper towels used by patients.

We are lucky to have a complete bathroom at the end of our home where any sufferers will be quarantined.

Hand sanitizers; LYSOL and bleach and hand wipes. I am buying Vitamin C from a Health Food Store.

As for most of us: This Is A Work In Progress. Stay well all... BASS
 

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Hunter/Survivor
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As CornMan stated above, I use buillon cubes when my making rice and it comes out great. I always have Garlic salt and freshly ground pepper on hand. Worstheshire sauce, ketchup and mayonnaise and pepper flakes are also stocked. Cant do without extra olive oil.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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33,594 Posts
Couple bags of Mustard seeds.
Bulk bag of Turmeric.
Pepper corns.
Couple big jars of Chili powder
Lots of salt.
Garlic powder
Giant thing of pickle slices couple gallons.
Giant thing of seafood seasoning. almost a gallon size. Add a tablespoon of it to any soup or stew.
Need to plant some basil and onions.
 

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Indefatigable
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Go online - to places you find large collections of recipes. My top 2 fav are Pinterest and Allrecipes, but you might want to just do a general search as well. Even better make a trip to the library or bookstore for a hard copy of a cookbook.

Look for Eastern Indian cookbooks and recipes. It will teach you how to make every condiment you can think of and give you hundreds of ways to cook and season rice. If Indian doesn't suit your taste - try Japanese.
One of the easiest I can think of is use a liquid other than water when cooking the rice. Try chicken broth or V8 or even fruit juice.
 

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I was just talking with my wife about this! We're fairly prepared on the basics, but we just did a walmart run to stock up on snack and sweets beacuse we realised that we never think about those items as part of our prep. And when we came back I realised that we should stock up on condiments, too. No harm in doing that since we eat a lot of mayo and mustanrd anyway so we can stock up and replenish as we go along.
 

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The best way to deal with the "rice again" complaint is to start working it into your diets now so they get somewhat used to it.

A can of diced tomatoes and pepper, some onion and bullion make a really good rice. Fry the onion first, once that is done fry the rice, once the rice starts to brown, add the can of tomato and bullion and water, cook on low simmer for 20 minutes until the water is gone and the bottom starts to brown but not burn. Ideally you want to do a small amount of rice in a large pan so it is only a couple layers of rice thick.

Sauces are great on rice, soy, sweet and sour, malt vinegar, hot sauce, salsa, teriyaki, green salsa.

Taco seasoning, cumin, onion and garlic powder, turmeric, and MSG are all good dry seasoning to make rice taste better and are quick to toss in to a boiling pot.


Cheese and sour cream are good toppings.

Make beans, put a bed of rice on the plate cover with beans, add some chopped raw veggies and a bit of soy sauce.

Rice pudding is easy to make.

Make a stir fry and serve it on a bed of rice.

I recently found a tomato bullion cube, everything on the package is in spanish so I am not sure what it is but if I chop up a cube and add it to 1 cup rice, 2 cups water and cook it makes a pretty flavorful rice on its own.

A bit of chorizo goes good with rice. Fry the rice and cherizo and some onion together, once things start to brown add the water and cook as you normally would rice.

I personally do not like sticky rice so I am somewhat careful when cooking rice to make sure the grains stay individual and fluffy. Some things call for sticky rice so knowing how to make it how you want it is helpful. For sticky rice give the rice a stir while it is cooking. For non sticky rice 1 part rice 2 parts water+ a tiny bit more, heat to boiling, reduce to a slow simmer and cover, simmer until the water is gone. To keep the grains fluffy do NOT stir the rice in any way once the water is hot. Once all the water is absorbed, take off the heat, and leave covered for 5-10 minutes, then fluff the rice and leave covered another 5-10 minutes.

Chopped cabbage and onion(raw or cooked) make a wonderful topping for rice with a bit of soy sauce or sweet and sour.
 

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Forward, into the fray!
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Perhaps it may be wise to stock up on the ingredients to MAKE some of these condiments. You might find yourself out of ketchup but come spring you get a bushel of tomatoes. Why just eat tomatoes when you can catch back up on your ketchup, salsa and BBQ sauce if you have the ingredients.

Some of these condiments go fermented after a while, and while not poisonous they don't taste anywhere near as good anymore. A few large flower pots on the patio and seeds, some spices and vinegar will refresh your supply. (Ok, that doesn't work if you go through as much salsa as I do. You need too many tomato plants for the patio pots.)
 

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I think I might be one of the very, very lucky ones. My spices? Whole cumin seeds and I have lot vacuumed packed. My pepper corns are vacuumed packed. Himalayan salt. I have almost two quarts of dried garlic that I did myself and many quarts of dehydrated onion I also did myself. That is all I use. I guess I am a simple gal. Lucky me.
 

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You can also improvise a lot of condiments if you have tomato(paste, whole, powder, what ever),sugar(syrup, molassas, brown, white, fake), salt, and vinegar. Plus various seasonings.

Ketchup: tomato, sugar, vinegar, spices.

BBQ sauce: Tomato, more sugar, less vinegar, spices.

Sweet and sour: Less tomato, More sugar, more vinegar, salt, spices.

Baked bean sauce: Tomato, sugar, tiny bit of vinegar, spices.

Depending on how you make it these sauces may be a pale intimation of the original or they could be much better. My family doesn't like my homemade sweet and sour sauce, but when I wash out the empty store bought bottle and refill it with homemade love it, they even like to rub it in how much better the "store bought" sauce is than what I made.
 

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Dismember
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I have about every herb and spice, and lots of bullion pellets and cubes. You can get most things for cheap at places like Aldi and Dollar Tree. Flavor will be worth gold if the food gets boring.

Do it like this:
Like Italian? For spaghetti and pizza, buy basil, oregano, garlic powder (not garlic salt) onion powder.
Like Mexican? Buy cumin, chile powder, garlic, onion.
Like Indian or Asian? Tons of sites give you a list. It will be a skill you will use forever.

I have a recipe for easy and dirt cheap Pizza dough that requires no mixer or kneading. Ummm, Mexican Pizza!

BTW-I'm a big fan of, "Better Than Bullion" in every flavor. Don't buy it as storage food, it must be refrigerated after opening.

BUT most importantly do not use this for canning!! It can cause jar failure that will make you cry.
 

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Fresh veggies can make food from storage much easier to eat.

Some vegetable also last much longer than other. Lettuce turns brown in a week, a head of cabbage can be kept for 3 or 4 months and can be used in most ways that lettuce can be.

Onions, potatoes, garlic and carrots last a long time and can be stocked up on.

Celery, and cucumbers, and broccoli don't last nearly as long and shouldn't be stock up on unless you have a way to preserve them.
 
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