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Defenseless old man
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Discussion Starter #1
It's a rare prepping household that doesn't have a gas lantern and fuel stored for an emergency. Light's a handy thing to have. Same with portable stoves for heating victuals.

I discovered a Facebook forum called the 'Antique & Vintage Coleman Lantern & Stove Collectors'.

I've learned a lot from them about how to maintain, disassemble, repair, reassemble, and find spare parts for old Coleman stoves and lanterns. The forum isn't limited to Coleman products, and includes discussions of other brands, and other liquid-fuel-burning devices, both foreign and domestic.
 

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Couldn't live without my Coleman stoves and lanterns. Have seven lanterns last count including kero, mogas, white gas and propane, including a tiny dual fuel that's sold as being for backpacking. Four stoves: three, two and one burner using mogas or white gas or propane. Two white gas heaters that are great for tent camping. Much of the stuff is over fifty years old and works great. If you maintain them to a minimum they seem to last forever. As more kids forswear the outdoors in favor of video games lots of them show up at yard sales and thrift shops.
 

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Defenseless old man
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Discussion Starter #4
There've been some suggestions for alternate fuels. Some suggest OE Gas (NO Ethanol, high octane). It's not always easy to find a station that sells it. I found a website that has maps by state where it can be found. I keep 20 gallons stabilized and stored, and I'm
running an old Coleman lantern on it exclusively to see how well and how long it runs.

Here's the website:

https://www.pure-gas.org/
 

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I gave up on mantle lights because the mantles are just too fragile since they stopped making the radioactive ones. Any tricks for longer life? Or any good brands? I just ordered some led lanterns and a lantern was cheaper than a pack of mantles. Included batteries.
 

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I gave up on mantle lights because the mantles are just too fragile since they stopped making the radioactive ones. Any tricks for longer life? Or any good brands? I just ordered some led lanterns and a lantern was cheaper than a pack of mantles. Included batteries.
Dunno which mantles are run in the multifuels, but we’re on the first mantle I loaded up in a Coleman propane lantern for the back deck.

It’s a Coleman Northstar lantern, with the one large mantle.

Over a year mixed use on it, mostly summer, but fire it up every now and again just because the light output is “nicer”.

No idea on if it would travel well at all though. But for simple static use, I’m quite pleased with it.
 

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Another great site for information is coleman collectors forum. Don’t need Facebook or anything special to look at it. They also know lots of any and all gpa’s (Gas Pressurized Appliances). Did you know coleman made pressurized stove/oven combos?

It has been discussed and I believe that coleman mantles, if you can get them burned in properly, perform well. I, and many other on the forum, do prefer peerless mantles. They are cheaper and from what I can tell last longer and are stronger.
 

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In Memory
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For the price, you cannot do much better than Coleman DUEL FUEL lanterns & stoves.



In particular, Coleman 533 duel fuel stoves are top notch.
With a pair of 533's & my DIY grate, I can cook big hearty meals PDQ.

 

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Once the mantles are "burned in" they are quite fragile. If the lamp is not moved too much or manhandled they can last a long time. I always carried a couple of spares per lamp when I camped, they are cheap.
 

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herein lies the rub: I've three Coleman lanterns, two dual fuel (white gas and unleaded) and one white gas only. I live in SoCal suburbia, what's a safe storage method to use? I would rather have them outside of my garage, the ongoing fires are making me uneasy. Also, propane canisters...
 

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herein lies the rub: I've three Coleman lanterns, two dual fuel (white gas and unleaded) and one white gas only. I live in SoCal suburbia, what's a safe storage method to use? I would rather have them outside of my garage, the ongoing fires are making me uneasy. Also, propane canisters...
I’d figure up to a gallon or few should be allrite in your garage, in proper containers.

Caveate: I no longer store any volotiles above spray paint can sized in my shop/garage. Simply because it’s my reloading area. Still would be fine if I did store it there, but I just do not want to. I now store volotiles in an outdoors locker. Used to store several “jerry cans” of gasoline in the garage.
 

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I love coleman lanterns, and have a few. only ever bought one new, the rest I buy at yard sales and flea markets, never pay more than $12 for one.

I buy mantles in bulk online, much cheaper than in the store (though you can occasionally find clearance deals at the end of the year and stock up that way).

the mantles can last a long time if you take care of them, properly burn them in, and be gentle with the lanterns and store them properly, but if not, they are pretty cheap and good to keep on hand, along with fuel (it doesn't go bad that I've ever found). I've only got one dual fuel, picked it up this summer for $8, upscale neighborhoods who try "camping" once and give up are great places to find them...

old broken ones are good for parts, and there are great rebuild tutorials on the websites
 

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Canning queen
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I gave up on mantle lights because the mantles are just too fragile since they stopped making the radioactive ones. Any tricks for longer life? Or any good brands? I just ordered some led lanterns and a lantern was cheaper than a pack of mantles. Included batteries.
Center draft lamps are very nearly as bright as mantle lamps (I too have given up on these) and much more durable, as the mantle is a tube of wick. There are a number of them, but the most common is the Rayo lamp company - at least, up here near me.
 

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I love coleman lanterns, and have a few. only ever bought one new, the rest I buy at yard sales and flea markets, never pay more than $12 for one.

I buy mantles in bulk online, much cheaper than in the store (though you can occasionally find clearance deals at the end of the year and stock up that way).

the mantles can last a long time if you take care of them, properly burn them in, and be gentle with the lanterns and store them properly, but if not, they are pretty cheap and good to keep on hand, along with fuel (it doesn't go bad that I've ever found). I've only got one dual fuel, picked it up this summer for $8, upscale neighborhoods who try "camping" once and give up are great places to find them...

old broken ones are good for parts, and there are great rebuild tutorials on the websites
Nice collection you have there!

I wouldnt use one of these lanterns indoors for very long. They can smell up a place quick and leds are so cheap, safe and efficient. That being said i always have a coleman dual mantle ready to go and one always comes camping with us.
I have burned 15yr old coleman fuel and wouldnt notice a difference. I keep a couple of gallons of the stuff around so unless we use it for cooking its a life times worth.
 

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Center draft lamps are very nearly as bright as mantle lamps (I too have given up on these) and much more durable, as the mantle is a tube of wick. There are a number of them, but the most common is the Rayo lamp company - at least, up here near me.
Center draft lamps (Aladdin style) is about 40-60 candle power. The smallest single burner coleman is 250 candle power. The biggest is 550 candle power. That is 9 times brighter than an center draft lamp. If I had questionable fuel a CDL would be preferred but I have 30 gallons of k-1 kerosene and the lanterns and the knowledge to convert many from coleman fuel to kerosene, as well as factory made kerosene lanterns. Kerosene is better for in house use do to risk of fire. I just had two burning for 4 hours last night. Freezing temps outside and 70*f inside. No other heat in that room.

I buy many of these and keep the nice/collectible ones and give away or sell the others. I think I have about 75 lanterns and 40+ stoves (single burner upto 3 burner on coleman fuel or kerosene or propane) I have two three burner stoves that can run on coleman fuel, gasoline, kerosene, and propane with different generators and preheating.
 

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It's a rare prepping household that doesn't have a gas lantern and fuel stored for an emergency. Light's a handy thing to have. Same with portable stoves for heating victuals.

I discovered a Facebook forum called the 'Antique & Vintage Coleman Lantern & Stove Collectors'.

I've learned a lot from them about how to maintain, disassemble, repair, reassemble, and find spare parts for old Coleman stoves and lanterns. The forum isn't limited to Coleman products, and includes discussions of other brands, and other liquid-fuel-burning devices, both foreign and domestic.
I joined too. Love the care they give the lanterns!
 

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Nice collection you have there!

I wouldnt use one of these lanterns indoors for very long. They can smell up a place quick and leds are so cheap, safe and efficient. That being said i always have a coleman dual mantle ready to go and one always comes camping with us.
I have burned 15yr old coleman fuel and wouldnt notice a difference. I keep a couple of gallons of the stuff around so unless we use it for cooking its a life times worth.
Thanks, I've added a few more since I took that picture for another forum.

I use mine inside, but only one at a time, and that's because I prefer kerosene lanterns and candles in the house. so when the power goes out (5 times this year!), I have a routine.

grab a flashlight and go out to the polebarn and grab a coleman that's ready to go and light it. it gives off plenty of light that I can then see in the dark shop to grab the kerosene lanterns, fuel, etc. whatever's needed and bring them all into the house to get lit and place around the rooms.

kerosene doesn't give off near the light, so I use the coleman if we are going to read. otherwise I turn it off. I also use candles.

as for LED's, it's too expensive to burn through batteries for extended lengths when the power may be off for several days at a time. battery power is to get me to the longer lasting fuel sources...
 

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Why not use kerosene coleman lanterns? They are actually brighter than their white gas counterparts due to kerosene having more energy than white gas.
 
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