Survivalist Forum banner

21 - 40 of 49 Posts

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,910 Posts
Any sword made in SS....is also known as a "SLO".....and is meant ONLY for display......

just read this....

www.sword-buyers-guide.com/battle-ready-sword.html
The first SS sword I bought was back in the mid 70's, and it was one of the few that was actually made of steel that could be used. Most back then were some kind of white/pot metal and meant for display only.

That first SS blade took a lot of hard abuse, and would likely still be going strong, if I hadnt lost it. The second SS blade has also taken a lot of abuse too, and it too has held up well.

The one thing Ive had the most trouble with, has been the grip/handle. They are made of plastic, and at some point, the wrap will come apart, and the handle itself will break, especially if youre using them hard.

That, and the collar that holds the tsuba on can break, letting it come off.

Even though they work for what Ive been using them for over the years, they really arent made for actual use, other than maybe cutting melons at demos.

I kind of doubt those selling them actually think they will get any kind of use beyond something like that. Still, the blades seem to hold up OK, and the design seems to work well, even if they are lacking in some of the other parts.

I also bought a similar type sword a number of years back, I think it was off Bud K. It has a full tang, steel blade with wood panels. The blade is more straight, like the "ninja" type swords they sell, and appears to be Indian in origin. The metal is crappy, doesnt hold any kind of edge, and its a terrible cutter. It actually hurts your hands to cut with it. Kind of looks the part though, but thats about it.

Id say, if you want a sword specifically to fight with, then you should probably buy one meant for that. My guess is, youll probably pay to much for something youll never actually use or be able to vet, but, youll have what you want. If youre going to do that, probably best to get some training with it as well. Might as well know how to use it. :)

Just keep in mind, and even though its a movie, that scene from Indiana Jones was very likely prophetic and "real world". I know Id just shoot you if you pulled it on me. :D:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Rural Buckeye Guy the first sword I wanted was a Gladius. The local Academy even had the Cold Steel Gladius you linked to. But after seeing it in person I decided to pass. Its really nothing more than their other economy blades they have sold for years.

I have a willow leafed 13" and 18" Cold Steel machetes now that both come to a sharp point. I could if I wanted just sharpen the top edge to match the bottom edge and have the same thing as the Gladius. Heck I may do that on the 13" knife. It was only about $20 or so so no loss if I screw it up.

This page has 4 nice Gladius weapons and the Cold Steel version. They are either made in the Phillipine's or El Salvador. Or in the case of the Cold Steel in south Africa. ???

https://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_store.html?usrsearch=gladius
 
  • Like
Reactions: SoJ_51

·
Space Force Recruit
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Cold steel has been very hit or miss for me.

I have a lot of their knives and some are very high quality for what you pay for and others are expensive scrap metal.

The GI Tanto I have is nicked, finish worn and the scales broke off (those were cheap plastic anyway)... after thousands of times throwing it in to things, using it as a pry bar, a wedge to split small logs and it's still got a LOT of life in to it, especially if I decide to repair the edge itself. Paid under $30 for it.

On the other hand I have a Leatherneck SF and the tip bent despite being reinforced and it's lost an edge pretty quickly and I've never thrown this knife. Paid about $60 for it.

I've heard their cheap machetes are junk but no experience with those specifically, just my experience with their products.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,673 Posts
I totally agree about having a gun (or 100:D:) and plenty of ammo if you're talking current-world self-defense. However, it's ironic that in some cultures a blade is respected and feared more than the AK47 hanging on their shoulder. I've had my Afghan conversations sway towards my knife (or knives) more than a few times. While the business end of the gun would get more attention, a large blade does the same. Just never bring a knife to a gun fight!

I have a few dual-purpose big blades. While I see them as tools first, they can be devastating weapons. Think Kukri. I do have some higher end short-swords (Laci Szabo Bush Sword, Rat Waki, etc.), weight is a factor, and I like the lighter weigh of a machete, but the kukri is another good option. Price for value, check out Condor Knife and Tool:

https://www.knifecenter.com/series/condor-tool-and-knife/carbon-steel-machetes

ROCK6

Funny enough, I just got a new Condor Heavy Duty Kukri on ebay that was advertised as new, I won the auction for $73, but then the seller refunded my money for some reason. I thought it was because he didn't want to sell it that cheap and F'd me over, so I emailed him. He said it was "damaged", he sent me photos and turns out the blade was just stained with some oxidation. We came to an agreement at a reduced price of $50 shipped. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,564 Posts
If you keep up with the Renaissance Fair, the boys that do sword fighting go through a lot of steel. You might have a talk with them if you get the opportunity.
I bought a crusaders sword made from spring steel. Beautiful work but I hesitate to use it in battle unless I had to.
Even the old original swords got broken in battle so it should be no surprise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,564 Posts
My son and I took up fencing and had great fun.
If you have some one to play with it can be a ball.
He since moved away so I take my swords out once in a while a give my self a good stretch and a little sparing with trees. It's funny how accuracy goes away with out regular practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,290 Posts
Any sword made in SS....is also known as a "SLO".....and is meant ONLY for display......

just read this....

www.sword-buyers-guide.com/battle-ready-sword.html
I just don't buy this anymore. Condor has 420 SS machetes that I have abused. My custom bush sword is an incredibly well heat-treated ATS34 and I've bounced it off a rock and hit fencing wire a couple of time. Zero chipping. It was done right, which is what's important.

I would still recommend higher carbon steels, but from reputable blade smiths and some companies, the fear of a large stainless steel blade are no longer warranted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
If you keep up with the Renaissance Fair, the boys that do sword fighting go through a lot of steel. You might have a talk with them if you get the opportunity.
I bought a crusaders sword made from spring steel. Beautiful work but I hesitate to use it in battle unless I had to.
Even the old original swords got broken in battle so it should be no surprise.
I have never been to a Renaissance Fair and we have one not too far from me in Waxahachie Tx. Thats probably good advice but I am not really into swords. My wants are just simply another weapon. I like weapons of all sorts and like how they were used throughout history.
 

·
Si vis pacem, para bellum
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
I have never been to a Renaissance Fair and we have one not too far from me in Waxahachie Tx. Thats probably good advice but I am not really into swords. My wants are just simply another weapon. I like weapons of all sorts and like how they were used throughout history.
Scarborough Faire. If you want a real forged sword with life time support and trade up options go to the Angel Sword booth.
 

·
I love this *****
Joined
·
33,879 Posts
I have been watching Forged In Fire on YT and would like to buy a sword. I like the price and the way the Cold Steel Wakizashi looks. And I found a deal on a used one. It has the Ray skin and 21" blade. I don't want a very long sword. Something that could be used indoors or a semi confined area.

I have an 18" Ontario Machete and a 1909 Argentine short sword I have seen called an engineers sword with around a 17" blade.

It looks like this. https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1017268498?pid=847283

If this isn't a good choice what would you recommend? I am not after some historical wall hanger but a weapon that can be used in a pinch that will stand up to use.
You really can't go wrong with anything made by Cold Steel (in the majority of cases). The sword looks pretty nice to me. I'm a knife guy but if I were into swords I'd have no problem buying it.
 

·
Amateur of all trades
Joined
·
551 Posts
Rustednail.
SS does NOT equate to poor performance. I've worked with dozens of various stainless alloys and yes Most of them are not cutlery worthy. ATS 34, 440C (both stainless steels) are superior alloys for knives and swords. The author has a limited knowledge of metallurgy because hardness is only one of several traits that will define the usefulness of an alloy for a specific application. He must be thinking of Mall Ninja stores and those wallhanger Katanas made of 304. BTW 304 is used for kitchen sinks, pots & pans, and dinner table flatware. 304 is often thought of as a 'low grade' stainless but this not the case. It is cheaper because the tonage and variety of commonly used products is far greater than others. 5160 is an excellent sword and throwing knife alloy, but does not have great edge retention. The author was spot on with emphasis on heat treatment and the trick is more that than the alloy as long as the carbon content is sufficient. You could use the same steel for a sword and a knife but the heat treating method would be slightly different for the two.
 

·
AimSmallMissSmall
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
Superflux....I see no need to argue your position on how SS is acceptable....but with all your information..you failed to provide a link....for those products you find to be acceptable....and the costs of them...

nor have you provided a link to back up your position on SS for swords....so at this point it is only your opinion....I can post links that show reason...NOT to use ss....


www.martialartswords.com/blogs/articles/stainless-steel-vs-high-carbon-steel-swords

www.quora.com/Is-stainless-steel-good-for-swords

https://armablade.com/strongest-sword-material/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I recently purchased the Honshu Boshin Wakizashi. Its Awesome! Im no expert but it’s everything they claim it to be, im going to get their Katana and Tanto so I’ll have the set. Very well worth it IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,290 Posts
Superflux....I see no need to argue your position on how SS is acceptable....but with all your information..you failed to provide a link....for those products you find to be acceptable....and the costs of them...

nor have you provided a link to back up your position on SS for swords....so at this point it is only your opinion....I can post links that show reason...NOT to use ss....


www.martialartswords.com/blogs/articles/stainless-steel-vs-high-carbon-steel-swords

www.quora.com/Is-stainless-steel-good-for-swords

https://armablade.com/strongest-sword-material/
Cost is really the only limiting factor, not performance. I would put my custom ATS34 sword up against any carbon steel sword. I've hit a large rock, cable, and wire; only one small dent...zero chipping. Again, a properly forged and/or heat-treated, quality stainless alloy is not the issue...it's simply the price. If you want a solid performing sword at a good value, a carbon steel is the better choice, but they still rely on good forging and/or heat treatment.

Ironically, my favorite machete that I abuse for work around the homestead is a Condor Knife and Tool 420SS machete. Yes, it's chipped a little, but has handled some significant abuse.

ROCK6
 

·
AimSmallMissSmall
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
Cost is really the only limiting factor, not performance. I would put my custom ATS34 sword up against any carbon steel sword. I've hit a large rock, cable, and wire; only one small dent...zero chipping. Again, a properly forged and/or heat-treated, quality stainless alloy is not the issue...it's simply the price. If you want a solid performing sword at a good value, a carbon steel is the better choice, but they still rely on good forging and/or heat treatment.

Ironically, my favorite machete that I abuse for work around the homestead is a Condor Knife and Tool 420SS machete. Yes, it's chipped a little, but has handled some significant abuse.

ROCK6

show a link to a ss blade that is acceptable....in price and performance..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,290 Posts
show a link to a ss blade that is acceptable....in price and performance..
You won't find any acceptable at an acceptable price. That said, if I wanted an acceptable stainless sword, your only choices are something in 420HC. I was just pointing out stainless can be used, it just requires custom work and expensive (I paid something like $550 for my custom Bush Sword about 15 years ago or so...).

For inexpensive, carbon steels are simply a better deal and much more forgiving if mass-produced.

ROCK6
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,910 Posts
The couple of cheap, SS swords I have/had took decades of abuse, and the one I have is still going, and I just used it yesterday taking out an unruly bush in the yard.

Makes me wonder whats wrong with it. :)

How many who have the the more expensive carbon steel blades are willing to use theirs like I use mine? :thumb:
 

·
What would Mal do
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
fair nuff.

I'm not worthy of an expensive waki...

mine is from SaberSmith.. better known for their Renfest presence., and not a true Waki - in fact it was their hand n a half design that caught my attention

modified a bokken to the same dimensions for practice.

beyond just coolness, and enjoying the sport a little, I can only imagine that i've watched too many movies to think that I might grab it instead of a firearm for a bump in the night moment. But i'm sure not taking this thing out to do yard work.
 

·
What hell, pay attention
Joined
·
7,910 Posts
LOL. I dont doubt it. Most wouldnt.

I bought my first with no intention of using it for work. I was pretty heavily into a couple of different martial arts at the time, and had a little bit of training with different weapons, including the sword and knife.

That sword was one of the few available at the time, that had a blade that could actually be used to strike something harder than a ripe lope or melon with. Most were pot metal display blades.

After dealing with machetes and brush hooks at work for a long time, and not really messing with the sword much anymore, I figured why not give it a try.

It was the one of my better choices in life too. :)

And one big advantage to using it at work, if you were ever planning on actually using it as a weapon, it actually gives you experience with how to properly cut things with it, and what to expect.

You wouldn't believe the number of people in the past who wanted to try it once they saw it, and had trouble cutting a 1" sapling and even light brush with it.

Trying to explain that the cut doesnt occur and stop at the point of contact, and that your focus is a point out beyond the target. You have to "cut through", and use your body, not your arms to do it.

Its basically the same principle as a punch. Youre not trying to hit a spot on the body with just your hand, but a point out beyond it, using your whole body, so youre "punching through".

If youre really into the Kenjitsu thing, might be worth picking up one of the SS blades and start doing some yard work. :D:
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
Top