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For my rifles, I like the coated Dewey rods. They have interchangeable tips that make it easy to switch between brush and jag.

Handguns, I use 3 or 4 of the aluminum rods, each with different tips/brushes, so I dont have to keep changing them out.
 

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+1 on the Dewey rifle rods and implements. They also make a ball bearing handle pistol rod for .22-9mm/.357. For my .44 and .45 revolvers I use a Dewey shotgun chamber rod with .410 shotgun implements. For shotgun cleaning I use a WW2-era one-piece solid brass GI shotgun rod which takes common shotgun implements and resembles an S&W pistol rod sized up for King Kong.
 

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I like all steel rods, BUT been using bore snakes last few years
Jointed steel rods are OK for utility use, but not for precision equipment. One piece steel rods should be used with a bore guide and should be frequently wiped, every stroke, to avoid carrying abrasive residues down the bore. Same precaution is recommended with coated rods when cleaning that $1000 Krieger barrel.

Bore snakes tend to pick up abrasive primer combustion products from bore residue, which become embedded in the cord. You must be careful in pulling the snake through and out the barrel. They are OK for occasional expedient use on utility grade guns, especially for shotguns, but I would not use them on precision competition or sniper weapons, as they can damage the muzzle crown unless you are VERY careful.
 

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I like brass or aluminum rods for handguns and rifles, because they are softer than the barrel I'm cleaning. Same reason I prefer brass cased ammo over steel cased. I had bought an old canvas shotgun carry case at a rummage sale, and it had a hardwood cleaning rod with brass screw joints packed in the front pouch. I like using it just for nostalgia sake.
 

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Bore snakes tend to pick up abrasive primer combustion products from bore residue, which become embedded in the cord. You must be careful in pulling the snake through and out the barrel. They are OK for occasional expedient use on utility grade guns, especially for shotguns, but I would not use them on precision competition or sniper weapons, as they can damage the muzzle crown unless you are VERY careful.
So….are you telling me these abrasive primer combustion products are harder than steel?
Because if they aren’t, they won’t do anything but polish the bore and crown.

And unless you pull the bore snake a few hundred times…..well, really….how many pulls do you think it will take to hurt a crown, much less ruin it?

Not sure how my bore snake is any worse than the 50-250 rounds I drove through that barrel at high speed, at high temp, pushing the previous shells’ residues in the process.
 

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Another vote for Dewey. I have a Dewey knockoff for a range rod because I got tired of my Deweys sprouting legs and walking off. It works well enough, but it ain't a Dewey.

Bore snakes work okay until one breaks in the bore. There is no easy way to get it out.
 
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