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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I was hacking some branches off some old dried Golden bamboo. I take my knife and sharpen it today, and notice several small chips from the edge of the blade. Holy crap. I knew the stuff was hard, but not that hard. Granted, it was not the most expensive knife I had, but I never imagined bamboo would damage it like that.

I'm wondering if I can make the bamboo into a workable blade.
 

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crustulum latro
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I suspect some of the forums Vietnam vets could answer that question for you.
So, I was hacking some branches off some old dried Golden bamboo. I take my knife and sharpen it today, and notice several small chips from the edge of the blade. Holy crap. I knew the stuff was hard, but not that hard. Granted, it was not the most expensive knife I had, but I never imagined bamboo would damage it like that.

I'm wondering if I can make the bamboo into a workable blade.
 

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google punji stick ... think hypodermic needle, long tapered cut on one end. Good for stabbing, not so much for hacking or slicing.
 

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Bamboo is very hard and I am not surprised at your blade damage. Pine knots are hard on blades as well. Any pics?
 

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Crusty, Crunchy and Cute
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Stainless steel, to sharp of an edge and to brittle at the edge. It was going to happen. Unless you are really fond of that knife I would get a brush knife for that kind of work, it only costs you once and will probably outlast you. Be careful about your edge angle, you want a working edge not a shaving edge.
 

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Stainless steel, to sharp of an edge and to brittle at the edge. It was going to happen. Unless you are really fond of that knife I would get a brush knife for that kind of work, it only costs you once and will probably outlast you. Be careful about your edge angle, you want a working edge not a shaving edge.
+1. There was a thread on blade grind recently. For a working blade a convex is generally the best choice while a scandi/flat grind is best for minor chores and gives more "sharpness" than the convex while not being as strong.
 

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How about some more info, what kind of knife was it, what kind of steel? Some steels are hard and they chip instead of bend or roll, others are soft and roll instead of chip.
 

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I bet it is NOT a convex edge
 

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1st the heat-treat is unknown and the steel is crap.
2nd with a newer knife the first edge tends to be easy to chip because the blade is sharpened by a monkey with a grinder, thus over heating the edge of the blade makeing it brittle.
3rd Why are you useing that type of knife to chop with in the first place?
 

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Crusty, Crunchy and Cute
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But if you feel chopping is what you need or want to do get a real chopping tool, any of these would be better than what you were using.

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've got 3 of those machetes plus some others. The Fiskar's brush ax is the best for removing limbs.

I had the knife and wanted to see how it performed. Needless to say, I am disappointed by it. I bought it and a Condor Rodan at the same time, both for about $55 total. I tend to favor carbon steel blades and wanted to see how well the stainless steel blade would do. I think I'll stick with carbon steel whenever I can.

I have since built a fence of out bamboo around the garden, primarily using a Japanese style pull saw to do the cutting.
 

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The European Outdoorsman
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Some bamboo (depends on the variety) are on par in hardness with some steels. So, that shouldn't be a surprise.

Also, If I were you, I wouldn't clear bamboo. There are many, many poisonous types and on type in particular has a chemical similar to cyanide in its core. If you do cut it, use it for something else, it is extremely useful stuff!

As for the knife, I chipped a BK2 that I bought for $55 too. Doesn't mean the knife is bad. Take your time with some stones and if the chips are small, they should come out.
 

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I had a Buck "General" at one time and the first day I took it hiking I chopped a hickory tree about 1 inch in diameter for a walking stick. It rolled the edge like it was made of aluminum foil. Last buck I ever owned. I usually carry an original Kbar and never had anything like that happen.
 

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I had a Buck "General" at one time and the first day I took it hiking I chopped a hickory tree about 1 inch in diameter for a walking stick. It rolled the edge like it was made of aluminum foil. Last buck I ever owned. I usually carry an original Kbar and never had anything like that happen.
Regardless of how good Bucks heat treament is, their 420HC steel is still on the softer side and will tend to roll and get burrs with use. But it is still possible that you had a bad blade though, possible heat treament issue at the factory.
 
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