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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #1
Retreat Checklists - checklists to be used once relocation to retreat has occurred. Checklists will aide in making sure things are started in an orderly and efficient manner with minimal oversight.

This list is for a retreat that is actually a house in the country and a full time residence. Group members will be arriving at the retreat should some "event" transpire.

Any suggested additions or changes to the checklist? This will involve approx 4-5 families with varying age groups and 2 teenagers and a couple younger under-10 kids. Most all supplies are already pre-positioned at the retreat.


Day 1 Checklist - first 24 hours upon arrival:

Injuries? Check and treat.
Gather facts from all groups members
What has been seen and where?
What has been heard? Source?
Make sure everyone is informed and educated on all information.
Notes should be taken to reference later rather than relying on memory.
Determine potential threats if any? If so set up security watch right away.
Get someone on commo to gain intelligence/information. This includes internet/radio/TV/social media/Ham/CB
How much combined cash/silver/gold is on hand?
If safe - formulate a supply run(s) to purchase additional supplies while the ability still exists(see “Supply Run Checklist”)
Get inventory of all fuel.
How much is in each vehicle in gallons?
How much is currently stored?
Is it safe to go out for more? If so go get some. Get back quickly.
How much propane?
How much charcoal?
If electricity is still on get all rechargeable batteries into a charger.
Water running? If so fill all available containers.
Set up sleeping arrangements at a minimum on a temporary basis.
Cook a large, filling dinner - important for moral




Day 2-3 Checklist:

House rules - all determined by property owner
Everyone has communication methods on their body if they venture away from retreat more than “normal voice distance”
Set up Security/Patrol schedules
Get solar systems set up and running
Set up water filtration methods
Set up alternative bathroom facilities
Set up bathroom/sanitation schedule
Camouflage driveway entrance
Set up medical station for self treatment of minor cuts, burns, and scrapes
Determine any specific projects that need attention and seek volunteers/assign duties
Reach out to family and friends - OPSEC!!!!





Day 3-7 Checklist:
Determine outward patrol location and schedule
Set up OPLP areas
Set up defensive position and assign members to areas
Review communication protocols between members in defensive situations
Determine procedure for dealing with strangers/approaching people
Gather and set up rain gear/clothing
Doublecheck food inventory to determine how many days available for group




Thanks
 

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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #3
You may wish to also take into consideration quarantine in the event of illness or pandemic, etc. Having a permanent set up quarantine area for all new arrivals insures that any possible disease will not spread to the remainder of your community.
Good thinking. Pandemic is not something the group is considering but that is certainly worth noting and a discussion.

Appreciate it.
 
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RIP Dad
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Another thing to do would be to have something on the initial checklist for inventorying and adding the goods brought by those arriving. I know you said that most supplies were propositioned, but obviously each family would have food in their house that is part of their normal weekly consumption, hopefully that food would make its way into the vehicle before leaving for the retreat. That's how it's set up with my brother and his family. Every ting consumable and useful not already in place is to be brought along. You never know what useful goodies may be added to the groups available resources.
 

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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #5
Another thing to do would be to have something on the initial checklist for inventorying and adding the goods brought by those arriving. I know you said that most supplies were propositioned, but obviously each family would have food in their house that is part of their normal weekly consumption, hopefully that food would make its way into the vehicle before leaving for the retreat. That's how it's set up with my brother and his family. Every ting consumable and useful not already in place is to be brought along. You never know what useful goodies may be added to the groups available resources.
Appreciate that bacash - good idea. Will add to the list.
 

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You might want to think about a check list for the first people to arrive too...ensure place is safe and secure before settling in, assess any immediate considerations (fire wood, needed repairs, security concerns, etc), things the first group there has to do to signal to others arriving after them it is all clear (say, putting a flag out on porch or such), etc.

In addition to the note taking, an actual, written, day by day journal is a good idea. So is having a map handy to annotate as well.

In addition to the fuel check a vehicle condition and assessment after bugging out is a good idea too.
 

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Rifleman
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46 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You might want to think about a check list for the first people to arrive too...ensure place is safe and secure before settling in, assess any immediate considerations (fire wood, needed repairs, security concerns, etc), things the first group there has to do to signal to others arriving after them it is all clear (say, putting a flag out on porch or such), etc.

In addition to the note taking, an actual, written, day by day journal is a good idea. So is having a map handy to annotate as well.

In addition to the fuel check a vehicle condition and assessment after bugging out is a good idea too.
Appreciate the information. There are full time residents at the retreat now and your suggestions got me thinking about setting up communications as members get close.

Thanks.
 
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Pistol Shooter
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I would probably move "set alternate bathroom facilities " to day 1.

Are you going to need additional shelter, or temporary shelters for all these extra people?

What about, setting plans for gathering additional food to minimize use of stored food. Like gardening, hunting, fishing, & foraging

Set up plans for alternate rally locations in case everyone has to bug out or evacuate.


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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Small Town -

The bathroom facilities are sufficient for the first day or two with the qty of people at the retreat however long term need to be addresses. Depending on timing and what is going on it MAY be addressed first day. It is a low priority item.

Food gathering is a long term item that we deem not pertinent to be a priority within the first several days. An opportunity would not be passed up however sending out hunting parties and people to local fishing holes will certainly happen but not within week 1.

Rally points are an excellent idea although we should be communicating on the way in. The retreat is our bug out location.

Appreciate it.
 

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member
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As communications may not be a viable option, consider signals, codes, visual alerts in the event your retreat is compremised. Just sharing here but our group has prepositioned portable shelters (no tents) for all members. I like details and checklists also!... good post

I am in the midst of writing a series (week 5) on "Prepper Communities" to aid others in starting their group...
 

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If I had a voice I'd sing
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I was going to say, set up commo, and get someone watching the perimeter/gate with a handheld radio should be #1 on the list. If the folks have arrived at the BOL, something big has happened and there may already be crazy people out there.

OTOH, that may be on the checklist for the residents.

You inventoried some stuff, but I didn't see guns and ammo, web gear, etc.

Night vision, too.

.
 

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Couple questions.. Ill start with one.

Why the charcoal? Humans can smell meat when hungry and even more when starving a good distance. Woman smell even a longer distance than men.
 

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Good suggestions all, especially the commo considerations WRT in place, approaching, monitoring, etc. However, while mentioned comms at the front gate (I'm assuming your reference to primary entryway) might I suggest not only R/T handheld (for ease of carry and always having on-person) but also some kind of hard-wired unit as backup in the event EMP/CME etc. having taken that option out of the equation at least temporarily? Field phones come to mind (low tech versions to preclude them being toast in an electtonic spike situation) but there are other, similar, options available, too, the upside being no outsiders being able to monitor. Obviously this would preclude arrivals being able to communicate initially, and someone would always need to be on the receiving end to listen for incoming message(s).
Secondly, while you touch on medical self-help, what provisions are in place or prepped for for any members who are on meds that cannot be replaced/augmented by homeopathic methods? I'm referring to diabetics/insulin, heart meds and the like.
I understand that those with medical needs are responsible for making arrangements to attend to those specific needs, but unless you have an actual doctor or other legally privileged types to write prescriptions for such needs, what provisions do you have plans for to address those needs, if any in your situation, should the need arise?
In my mind, water, food, defensive/offensive topics are paramount, but health concerns rate at or near the top of the "needs" or must-haves, especially if an event ends up becoming a very long-term situation.
Ideally, having a physician within your group would be ideal and better knowledge above and beyond basic First Aid a huge plus for any group.
Along that line is what, if any, plans are in place should you have passerby types who are in need of medical assistance, and what/how much/how long would you or could you be willing to offer such assistance?
I understand that helping non-members is not a "primary" concern and any humanitarian aid rendered is entirely a personal decision, but if you won't/don't help them, will your compound be able to deal with (not to be uncaring) the remains should they expire nearby?
Lastly, and without giving away too many details, I'm curious about others suggest and what their means are for actually securing the property/compound perimeter, i.e., chain link fencing, barbed wire fencing, etc.
Needless to say, an 8' high cyclone fence topped with concertina razor wire would be the same as a neon sign stating "Lots of high value goodies inside!" to anyone who would happen upon it or seeing it from a distance. Those kinds of improvements aren't easily disguised, obviously, so what, if any, ideas might others suggest to try and maintain as low a profile as possible with regard to perimeter obstacles?
Thanks for any ideas put out for discussion. There is a LOT to consider and take into account when discussing a BOL and all it entails for maintaining its integrity in a SHTF scenario.
 

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I have a BOL location in the mountains in Arizona in a well forested area. I do have several neighbors and I know at least one is prepper minded. Securing the area is fairly difficult, but one advantage is that is is on a road with one way in and one way out. I plan to set out noise makers (using 12 gauge primers) on likely routes of approach on foot to alert us. We will also having roving patrols of the are 24x7. After a SHTF event I expect it to take a week of so for people to get desperate and the Security needs will escalate from that point for several months to a years. After most die from starvation of killing each other things will start to calm down a bit.
 

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Tested in the Wilderness
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I typed out this long checklist a few years ago which quite a few seem to like. It can be printed out and checked off if any wish to do that.

And I call mine a survival retreat but it can also be called a defensible retreat, a BOL = Bug Out Location, or even a vacation cabin / camp or a homestead if developed enough. The link to the Checklist and the actual checklist is a bit down the post > http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=84562=#5

AND if no one will click the link and look at the 60 questions and give it at least a quick look, here are a few on the Defensible Retreat Checklist >


Yes or No

___ ___ Have I devised a workable defense plan?

___ ___ Do I have a library in the retreat?

___ ___ Is the library good enough to provide the information needed after the collapse? If not, what books do I still need?

___ ___ Do I know the warning signs that will indicate that it is time to put my retreat plan into operation?

___ ___ Do I have the correct guns and ammunition or have I been swept away by the armament gurus into believing that tons of hardware can replace the right amount of the proper equipment?

___ ___ Am I highly motivated and self-confident?

___ ___ Am I psychologically equipped to defend my retreat? Can I or any of my group actually shoot intruders or raiders?

___ ___ Do I have a battle plan that fits everyone into the defense structure? such as shooters, non-shooters, gun loaders, look-outs etc...

___ ___ Do I know how everyone will get to the retreat, unless it is their permanent residence? Do they have at least one alternative contingency plan for getting to the retreat, preferably two?

___ ___ Do I know my home territory?

___ ___ Is water available independent of any municipal supply or source?

___ ___ Do I know how to use game, fish and wild plants in my area?

___ ___ Do I know how to garden in my area?

___ ___ Do I have a stock of barter goods? Are they properly stored?

___ ___ Is it possible for attackers, raiders to sneak up on my retreat unseen or, more importantly, for them to detect my retreat without exposing themselves?

___ ___ Have I tried to look at defeating my retreat from the eyes of an enemy?
 

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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #17
Good suggestions all, especially the commo considerations WRT in place, approaching, monitoring, etc. However, while mentioned comms at the front gate (I'm assuming your reference to primary entryway) might I suggest not only R/T handheld (for ease of carry and always having on-person) but also some kind of hard-wired unit as backup in the event EMP/CME etc. having taken that option out of the equation at least temporarily? Field phones come to mind (low tech versions to preclude them being toast in an electtonic spike situation) but there are other, similar, options available, too, the upside being no outsiders being able to monitor. Obviously this would preclude arrivals being able to communicate initially, and someone would always need to be on the receiving end to listen for incoming message(s).
Secondly, while you touch on medical self-help, what provisions are in place or prepped for for any members who are on meds that cannot be replaced/augmented by homeopathic methods? I'm referring to diabetics/insulin, heart meds and the like.
I understand that those with medical needs are responsible for making arrangements to attend to those specific needs, but unless you have an actual doctor or other legally privileged types to write prescriptions for such needs, what provisions do you have plans for to address those needs, if any in your situation, should the need arise?
In my mind, water, food, defensive/offensive topics are paramount, but health concerns rate at or near the top of the "needs" or must-haves, especially if an event ends up becoming a very long-term situation.
Ideally, having a physician within your group would be ideal and better knowledge above and beyond basic First Aid a huge plus for any group.
Along that line is what, if any, plans are in place should you have passerby types who are in need of medical assistance, and what/how much/how long would you or could you be willing to offer such assistance?
I understand that helping non-members is not a "primary" concern and any humanitarian aid rendered is entirely a personal decision, but if you won't/don't help them, will your compound be able to deal with (not to be uncaring) the remains should they expire nearby?
Lastly, and without giving away too many details, I'm curious about others suggest and what their means are for actually securing the property/compound perimeter, i.e., chain link fencing, barbed wire fencing, etc.
Needless to say, an 8' high cyclone fence topped with concertina razor wire would be the same as a neon sign stating "Lots of high value goodies inside!" to anyone who would happen upon it or seeing it from a distance. Those kinds of improvements aren't easily disguised, obviously, so what, if any, ideas might others suggest to try and maintain as low a profile as possible with regard to perimeter obstacles?
Thanks for any ideas put out for discussion. There is a LOT to consider and take into account when discussing a BOL and all it entails for maintaining its integrity in a SHTF scenario.
All good stuff but much beyond the scope of the original posting and checklist. The checklist is merely for remembering.

Regarding medical preparedness each member is responsible for their own medications and pre-staging extra supplies.

Thanks
 

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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #18
Couple questions.. Ill start with one.

Why the charcoal? Humans can smell meat when hungry and even more when starving a good distance. Woman smell even a longer distance than men.
Situation and conditions will dictate cooking methods.

Thanks
 

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Rifleman
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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the checklist MtnMan Mike!
 
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To build on the checklist format how about this:
Immediately Upon Arrival Role
Triage any injuries or medical conditions Medical Lead
Set perimeter watch Security Lead
Ensure everyone is hydrated and fed Engineering Lead
Establish signals and pass signs Security Lead
Establish internal communications system Communications & Intel Lead

Soon After Arrival Role
Treat injuries and medical conditions Medical Lead
Organize sanitation, cooking, and sleeping arrangements Engineering Lead
Take inventory
- Water
- Food
-Weapons & ammo
-Valuables & trade items" Inventory Lead
Assess vehicle condition and fuel Engineering Lead
Camouflage route taken if possible Security Lead
Establish communications monitoring system Communications & Intel Lead
Establish procedures for dealing with incoming people Security Lead
Set security schedules for perimeter watch Security Lead

Ongoing Role
Perform regular inventory evaluation of food, water, and valuables & trade items
- Incorporate medical supply needs from Medical Lead
- Incorporate arms & ammo needs from Security Lead
- Incorporate utility & fuel needs from Engineering Lead" Inventory Lead
Maintain a prioritized "Supply Run Checklist" Inventory Lead
Maintain means of water collection and purification, sanitation, cooking, lodging, power, and heating Engineering Lead
Communicate utility & fuel needs to Inventory Lead Engineering Lead
Establish and maintain quarantine area for new arrivals Medical Lead
Maintain inventory of medical supplies and communicate needs to Inventory Lead Medical Lead
Establish and ensure procedures for issuing medical supplies Medical Lead
Plan outward patrols and supply runs Security Lead
Communicate arms & ammo needs to Inventory Lead Security Lead
Ensure comms are monitored to gather intel Communications & Intel Lead
Compile intel and provide briefings to Community Lead Communications & Intel Lead
Prioritize and approve supply runs Community Lead
Prioritize and approve outward patrols Community Lead
Establish and maintain controlled access of arms & ammo Security Lead
Collect intel and sources from new arrivals Communications & Intel Lead

The roles aren't necessarily individual people, just a set of expectations that can be assigned.
 
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