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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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That always makes me jealous that we have no local source. I mail ordered my first major wheat shipment. I've been buying supplimentals through the health food store, which unfortunately, is the cheapest local source here.
 

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Sorry - I have to ask...

What do you do with all that wheat?



Just bought 500 lbs of red winter wheat in 50 lb sacks at Summitville Grain in Summitville, TN.

Nice folks, Grown locally. I drove this stuff home to Florida where it cost a whopping $50 for 50 lbs delivered (after spending Thanksgiving at the new BOL!).

cost? $8.50 per 50 lb bag.

Bubba
 

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Adventurer
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nice how do you plan to store it ?
 
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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Just bought 500 lbs of red winter wheat in 50 lb sacks at Summitville Grain in Summitville, TN.

Nice folks, Grown locally. I drove this stuff home to Florida where it cost a whopping $50 for 50 lbs delivered (after spending Thanksgiving at the new BOL!).

cost? $8.50 per 50 lb bag.

Bubba
What is the moisture level, is it dry enough to store as is or will you have to dry it further?
 

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Forever Vigilant
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What do you do with all that wheat?
The average adult male (close to obese in this country) consumes close to 500 lbs per year of products made from wheat. The non-obese adult male would consume approximately 325 lbs per year.

As far as your personal survival, wheat is about the most important long-term storable food you should have. For adult males, also add 125 lbs of rice, 60 lbs of sugar/honey, 15 lbs of salt, 100 lbs of legumes, 200 eggs, 75 lbs of powdered milk, and 40 gallons of oils (vegetable, olive, canola, etc.) for a well-rounded one year supply of long term food for one person.
 

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locomotive jockey
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The railroad and Cargill just completed the largest transfer of Winter red wheat in history, over 1.2 million tons in just over a week and a half. Not sure what it means but this years harvest is one of the largest in the last 80 years
 

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The railroad and Cargill just completed the largest transfer of Winter red wheat in history, over 1.2 million tons in just over a week and a half. Not sure what it means but this years harvest is one of the largest in the last 80 years
It means the prices of things made from wheat will start dropping because of the abundant harvest.

(Just thought you guys could use some humor this AM - :D:)
 

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Limpin to safety.
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That always makes me jealous that we have no local source. I mail ordered my first major wheat shipment. I've been buying supplimentals through the health food store, which unfortunately, is the cheapest local source here.
Get up with the local Texas Survivalist groups man. You can order things in bulk, and save your butt a ton.

Texas has more Survivalists groups then any other state. Really good ones too. Hell, some of the most organized to say the least.

Network and socialize brother, its fun, safer, provides alternative means to obtaining preps, and gives you hands on training.

Having a doctor and a dentist for a friend, is a plus too. :D:

Also, try and shop at Farmers markets as much as possible. I have a farmer that sells me 14 ears of Corn for a dollar. However I buy thousands of ears a year, and he already sets aside the crop for me.

SHTF, guess who still has a farmer friend growing him food? ;)
 
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Being Prepared
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What do you do with all that wheat?
Gave 100 lbs to a buddy, another 100 lbs to another friend and prepper.

Keeping 300 lbs (10 homer buckets in mylar) for my preps. Finally have a years supply for the family.

I don't know how to evaluate the moisture content for storage. Advice welcome, otherwise it's getting pack in mylar soon.

Bubba
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Gave 100 lbs to a buddy, another 100 lbs to another friend and prepper.

Keeping 300 lbs (10 homer buckets in mylar) for my preps. Finally have a years supply for the family.

I don't know how to evaluate the moisture content for storage. Advice welcome, otherwise it's getting pack in mylar soon.

Bubba
Desiccant.

I got mine from a internet floral supply house.

Re-usable.

10% of it turns blue when it is dry.
10% of it turns red when saturated.
80% is white all the time.

I use it for our grains. I filled 55-gallon drums with barley, or oats, or corn; and a small mason jar with about a cup of desiccant. It sucks the moisture right out of the grain.

After use, [if it is red] I pour the desiccant into a casserole dish and put in the oven at 120 degrees for 12 hours, to make it dry again [blue].

It should last nearly forever.

:)
 

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grow your own food
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What is wheat good for?

What do you do with all that wheat?
Really,

First, Learn how to make bread, from scratch. With and without yeast.

Second, Cracked wheat cereal, I grew up on the stuff and still love it.

Third, Whole wheat cereal, preheat a metal thermos by filling it with boiling water. Let set for a few minetes. pour water out and fill half way with fresh boiling water and 2 cups wheat. (I prefer white wheat for cereals) In the morning your cereal is hot and ready to go. No need to reheat if you use a good metal thermos.

these are just a few of the uses for wheat. It is the staff of life.:)
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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Get up with the local Texas Survivalist groups man. You can order things in bulk, and save your butt a ton.

Texas has more Survivalists groups then any other state. Really good ones too. Hell, some of the most organized to say the least.

Network and socialize brother, its fun, safer, provides alternative means to obtaining preps, and gives you hands on training.

Having a doctor and a dentist for a friend, is a plus too. :D:

Also, try and shop at Farmers markets as much as possible. I have a farmer that sells me 14 ears of Corn for a dollar. However I buy thousands of ears a year, and he already sets aside the crop for me.

SHTF, guess who still has a farmer friend growing him food? ;)
My location in Texas puts me 500-600 miles away from any of the groups. El Paso is isolated in far west Texas and everyone else is pretty much on the east side of the state. I'd probably do better to try and get involved with the ones in New Mexico, actually.

I'm friends with a lot of the local farmers. Nobody grows wheat here, but I do pick up a lot of veggies from the farmers market. In fact one of them owns what would be my first BOL if I'm forced to bug out, so networking definately comes in handy sometimes.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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My location in Texas puts me 500-600 miles away from any of the groups. El Paso is isolated in far west Texas and everyone else is pretty much on the east side of the state. I'd probably do better to try and get involved with the ones in New Mexico, actually.

I'm friends with a lot of the local farmers. Nobody grows wheat here, but I do pick up a lot of veggies from the farmers market. In fact one of them owns what would be my first BOL if I'm forced to bug out, so networking definately comes in handy sometimes.
According to the USDA:
http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Texas/Publications/pr14309.pdf

"The 2009 Texas winter wheat crop is forecast at 66.2 million bushels ..."

They have a cool table which breaks all of Texas into farming districts, and shows how much each district produces.

On their map El Paso looks to be in district #6, which borders districts #1-S and #7.

District #1-S's harvest this year is 5,100,000 bushels of wheat.
District #7's harvest this year is 1,700,000 bushels of wheat.

I think that a trip to Midland would put you into district #1-S, not sure how far that is, but it does not look like it would be a bad trip.
 

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Member
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That always makes me jealous that we have no local source. I mail ordered my first major wheat shipment. I've been buying supplimentals through the health food store, which unfortunately, is the cheapest local source here.
MikeK,

Check with your local feed store and ask for their feed wheat. Just make sure you're not getting seed wheat. It may be treated with insecticide and/or germination enhancers. The lables will be plainly marked.

There is no difference in the wheat that ends up going for animal feed vs the wheat that goes for human consumption other than possibly how much it is cleaned. Try to get tripple cleaned grain. Cleaning is just a process of blowing the chaff and dust out of the grain.

The one thing that you may not know for sure is which type of wheat you get. I went to our local Farmway dealer and paid $10.50 for a 50 lb sack that he said was triple cleaned but didn't know what type it was. It appeared to be hard red winter wheat and I figured since that was what the vast majority of wheat grown is (especially in our area) than it probably was. We made some bread out of it to be sure and it was great. Went back and bought 400 lbs more.

I'd be willing to bet you have a Farmway dealer near you (or some other) and could do the same thing. Don't get scared off by the 'animal feed' thing. I also bought my corn there too. Ask for feed corn. Makes great cornbread.

gk
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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MikeK,

Check with your local feed store and ask for their feed wheat. Just make sure you're not getting seed wheat. It may be treated with insecticide and/or germination enhancers. The lables will be plainly marked.

There is no difference in the wheat that ends up going for animal feed vs the wheat that goes for human consumption other than possibly how much it is cleaned. Try to get tripple cleaned grain. Cleaning is just a process of blowing the chaff and dust out of the grain.

The one thing that you may not know for sure is which type of wheat you get. I went to our local Farmway dealer and paid $10.50 for a 50 lb sack that he said was triple cleaned but didn't know what type it was. It appeared to be hard red winter wheat and I figured since that was what the vast majority of wheat grown is (especially in our area) than it probably was. We made some bread out of it to be sure and it was great. Went back and bought 400 lbs more.

I'd be willing to bet you have a Farmway dealer near you (or some other) and could do the same thing. Don't get scared off by the 'animal feed' thing. I also bought my corn there too. Ask for feed corn. Makes great cornbread.

gk
We do not have hulled or 'pearled' grains here. So what I buy can still be cleaned a bit more.

We have threshed it ourselves, but really it makes good bread either way.

Winnowing is easy. :)

If anyone is concerned about how clean it is, I would recommend that you simply do a quick winnowing yourself.
 
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