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So some friends in a neighboring state needed some help with a sudden family emergency. I used Zelle with my Chase bank account to send them 2500. I have a large balance with Chase, and I have used Zelle with Chase to send money many times to relatives. My friends had a Zelle account, so the transfer usually takes only minutes, which was important to them. I got a call from Chase fraud to verify the transaction. Good! Never sent money to them before, I appreciate that! The person on the phone, speaking with a heavy accent, (clearly in an offshore call center), asked to verify who I was, and then sent a text to the cell number on my account, and I responded with the code. She asked if I intended to send the money, I said yes. She then asked why I was sending the money. I said I'm sorry, but that's none of your business. She then asked is it a merchant? I said no. She then said then what is the purpose for sending them money? I replied again, none of your business. She asked is it a relative? Again, none of your business. She made another attempt or two to question me, and I said, we're done here, and hung up. The tranfer went through a few hours later.

I called on the premium customer line later to inquire as to this policy, and was transferred to a supervisor, also in off shore call center, with the same heavy accent. After explaining the situation, I was floored when he confirmed that this is their policy. He said "we have found that in 5 out of 10 cases, these transactions are being sent to those who are defrauding our customers, and after asking our customers about the transactions, most of them cancel them". I told him I found that number incredulous. I've never had them question any checks I write to individuals to make sure I wasn't being defrauded, nor do I need a nanny to question my money sending decisions. He was firm, so I thanked him for confirming this was bank policy, and I'll make my bank choices based on this information.

Anyone else have Chase or other banks interrogate you as to why you transfer money? I'm great with them verifying that I meant to do it, but personal questions as to the purpose for sending it I find outrageous.



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I told him I found that number incredulous.
While annoying, I can understand why they are doing it. There's a reason that blatantly obvious scams exist. Low intelligence, gullible and elderly (or a combination) individuals get scammed all the time so I get why Chase is doing it. 50% doesn't surprise me in the least bit, in general, people aren't very bright.

I've had to call and clear large purchases with Chase and other banks/cc companies before and it's certainly frustrating.

Edit: I should add, some of the scams out there are VERY tricky and intelligently thought through. I see it all the time in my line of work, so it's not just the low hanging fruit that Chase is trying to protect against.
 

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Sounds like you went out of your way to turn this in to a bigger problem than it is. If you were being scammed the first thing you do is report it to Chase and hopefully not be held accountable for the funds. Which means they have incentive to minimize fraudulent transactions.
 

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I have a cousin who nearly fell for the IRS scam until a cashier at Wallmart made a teasing smart-alec remark about the number of people buying gift cards for scammers.

I get a call nearly every day (sometimes twice a day) saying I'm already under arrest for Medicare fraud, and if I don't send them money today the police will come to my door.

I know of a fat, unlovely and not too bright woman who is still sending money to "her boyfriend" in Africa after years of being told it's a scam because she's desperate to be loved by someone--anyone.

These scams keep coming, by the dozens, because people fall for them every day. I rather appreciate my credit card company calling to ask me if I spent $200 in a shop in Texas yesterday only an hour after spending $22 for lunch in Larkspur Colorado. (Turns out that one was at the Renaissance Fair, and Texas was the home processing location of the artists booth I bought an item from.)

They ask what is the purpose of the payment so they can determine if it's a scam. If you had told them the payment was to keep from being arrested because you'd underpaid your taxes they would have set you straight on that scam. Instead of getting bent about it just tell them it's family business. You don't need the babysitting, but boy-howdy a lot of idiots out there do.
 

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I have sent money through western union before. Some of what I wrote on the form drew some red flags and the cashier thought for sure I was being scammed and tried to talk me out of it. After a few minutes of back and forth they went ahead with it. I found it annoying but if it really was a scam it would have been nice for them to warn me and try to talk me out of it.
 

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My husband was almost in tears when he had me listen to a scam message on his voicemail. I laughed and told him to delete it.

My husband's bank didn't have a problem when he wrote a check for $7,500 for the plumber, and mine hasn't had a problem, to my knowledge, with the check for $16K for the water cleanup.

When insurance paid the bank fronted me $5K until the check cleared, I was OK with that.

We bring large sums of $1 bills into the bank to be processed and turned into $20's. His bank does not have a problem with the transactions but others have tried to short us, give us $200 for a $300 transaction, etc. So that bank is OK, and I haven't had issues with mine.

I am doing Google pay transactions to my stepmother for the money my Dad loaned us on the plumbing and Google always says she is not in my phone book AM I SURE and I always say yes. But that is hundreds a month and not thousands.
 

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I get a call nearly every day (sometimes twice a day) saying I'm already under arrest for Medicare fraud, and if I don't send them money today the police will come to my door.
On my work computer I used to get FBI warning about having downloaded illegal porn ( via a DNS stack). It’s funny because the closest thing to porn on my work computer was when I tried to buy my daughter muddy girl camo and the search returned muddy girl porn.

I thought it was funny, but my wife cousin fell for it and sent them money.
 

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Wells Fargo does the same thing but would not send the money to be deposited into another US bank account (Non-Wells Fargo). The story we got with them was they wouldn't send the money because federal regulations were cracking down on money laundering. It was not a large sum of money. Suffice it to say Wells Fargo is not in my banking system any longer.
 

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Through Knowledge, Peace
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i always wondered about how many folks that run experian/transunion/equifax on the overseas phones are giving themselves perfect fico scores with the click of a button. Then cashing out hard here in the states.

What checks and balances are in place to stop this stuff from happening?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sounds like you went out of your way to turn this in to a bigger problem than it is. If you were being scammed the first thing you do is report it to Chase and hopefully not be held accountable for the funds. Which means they have incentive to minimize fraudulent transactions.
:rolleyes:

Sounds like you have a reading comprehension problem, or perhaps a cognitive problem in general....

I had no problem verifying the transaction was mine and intentional and did so. As I said, I welcome that. However, that does not extend to the reason for my sending money to another individual. If I mail someone a check, do they call and ask what the purpose of the check was??? No they do not. That would be just as outrageous.

If you intentionally send someone money through your bank, electronically, or in check form, and you verify your intent to do so, the bank has zero responsibility if you got yourself ripped off by the person you sent it to.



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Discussion Starter #12
Wells Fargo does the same thing but would not send the money to be deposited into another US bank account (Non-Wells Fargo). The story we got with them was they wouldn't send the money because federal regulations were cracking down on money laundering. It was not a large sum of money. Suffice it to say Wells Fargo is not in my banking system any longer.
I have sent money through Zelle with Wells Fargo many, many times. They have never demanded to know my reason for sending someone money. They have called and verified my intent, but not my reason for sending it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have a cousin who nearly fell for the IRS scam until a cashier at Wallmart made a teasing smart-alec remark about the number of people buying gift cards for scammers.

I get a call nearly every day (sometimes twice a day) saying I'm already under arrest for Medicare fraud, and if I don't send them money today the police will come to my door.

I know of a fat, unlovely and not too bright woman who is still sending money to "her boyfriend" in Africa after years of being told it's a scam because she's desperate to be loved by someone--anyone.

These scams keep coming, by the dozens, because people fall for them every day. I rather appreciate my credit card company calling to ask me if I spent $200 in a shop in Texas yesterday only an hour after spending $22 for lunch in Larkspur Colorado. (Turns out that one was at the Renaissance Fair, and Texas was the home processing location of the artists booth I bought an item from.)

They ask what is the purpose of the payment so they can determine if it's a scam. If you had told them the payment was to keep from being arrested because you'd underpaid your taxes they would have set you straight on that scam. Instead of getting bent about it just tell them it's family business. You don't need the babysitting, but boy-howdy a lot of idiots out there do.
Having worked in law enforcement my entire adult life, I certainly understand how many folks get scammed. But while I feel bad for them, (and actually arrested individuals doing it), being forced to give my reasons for sending someone money, to a foreign call center employee, is not OK with me. It's none of their friggin business. My refusal to say, should have ended the conversation.

You are correct, I should have just said "family business" and seen if that would have appeased them.

This is a self reliant forum. I would hope most here would appreciate my resentment at being nannied by a private company, through a foreign agent.


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Discussion Starter #14
While annoying, I can understand why they are doing it. There's a reason that blatantly obvious scams exist. Low intelligence, gullible and elderly (or a combination) individuals get scammed all the time so I get why Chase is doing it. 50% doesn't surprise me in the least bit, in general, people aren't very bright.

I've had to call and clear large purchases with Chase and other banks/cc companies before and it's certainly frustrating.
I have gotten those calls many times and they don't frustrate me at all. I'm glad they do it. But they never ask what the purpose of the transaction was, just verify my intent to do so.

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.

I get a call nearly every day (sometimes twice a day) saying I'm already under arrest for Medicare fraud, and if I don't send them money today the police will come to my door.
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Oddly I hadn't had one since I screamed "You'll never take me alive copper!" And proceeded to yell about how I had lots of Guns And was ready to go out in a " blaze of glory":D:


As to Chase:
After having them lie to me about having a bank in an area I was moving to, and then tell me there was no fee for a transfer.... And then try to charge me a fee...I closed my account.
 

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So some friends in a neighboring state needed some help with a sudden family emergency. I used Zelle with my Chase bank account to send them 2500. I have a large balance with Chase, and I have used Zelle with Chase to send money many times to relatives. My friends had a Zelle account, so the transfer usually takes only minutes, which was important to them. I got a call from Chase fraud to verify the transaction. Good! Never sent money to them before, I appreciate that! The person on the phone, speaking with a heavy accent, (clearly in an offshore call center), asked to verify who I was, and then sent a text to the cell number on my account, and I responded with the code. She asked if I intended to send the money, I said yes. She then asked why I was sending the money. I said I'm sorry, but that's none of your business. She then asked is it a merchant? I said no. She then said then what is the purpose for sending them money? I replied again, none of your business. She asked is it a relative? Again, none of your business. She made another attempt or two to question me, and I said, we're done here, and hung up. The tranfer went through a few hours later.

I called on the premium customer line later to inquire as to this policy, and was transferred to a supervisor, also in off shore call center, with the same heavy accent. After explaining the situation, I was floored when he confirmed that this is their policy. He said "we have found that in 5 out of 10 cases, these transactions are being sent to those who are defrauding our customers, and after asking our customers about the transactions, most of them cancel them". I told him I found that number incredulous. I've never had them question any checks I write to individuals to make sure I wasn't being defrauded, nor do I need a nanny to question my money sending decisions. He was firm, so I thanked him for confirming this was bank policy, and I'll make my bank choices based on this information.

Anyone else have Chase or other banks interrogate you as to why you transfer money? I'm great with them verifying that I meant to do it, but personal questions as to the purpose for sending it I find outrageous.



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I was similarly interrogated by a local bank in person when cashing 2 USPS money orders for around $1800ish. They refused to cash them until I told them what I had sold to be paid the money. It was extremely annoying. Your situation is not unique.

Also, yes, a ton of fraud occurs like this, and I believe in your case they were trying to make sure you werent being scammed, because a "relative/friend in need" is a common ploy.

My bank utilizes an America-based call center.
 

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:rolleyes:

Sounds like you have a reading comprehension problem, or perhaps a cognitive problem in general....

I had no problem verifying the transaction was mine and intentional and did so. As I said, I welcome that. However, that does not extend to the reason for my sending money to another individual. If I mail someone a check, do they call and ask what the purpose of the check was??? No they do not. That would be just as outrageous.

If you intentionally send someone money through your bank, electronically, or in check form, and you verify your intent to do so, the bank has zero responsibility if you got yourself ripped off by the person you sent it to.



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Not necessarily. My bank has been there for me when I got ripped off doing just that, except via my debit card to a merchant that sold me vaporware to the tune of $1200. Yes I intended to purchase. Yes I intended to be billed said sum. When the goods never arrived, my bank gave me the money back and went after the merchant.
 

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It happens with wires also. Both of our businesses are with Chase. They do this with Zelle and wires, especially new recipients

They are on the hook if it’s fraud. I would do it to. Although annoying because it slows the process down, imagine if you didn’t approve it and they didn’t ask? It happens a lot

Next tine you help that friend or family it won’t happen, was just the first time.
 

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:rolleyes:

Sounds like you have a reading comprehension problem, or perhaps a cognitive problem in general....

I had no problem verifying the transaction was mine and intentional and did so. As I said, I welcome that. However, that does not extend to the reason for my sending money to another individual. If I mail someone a check, do they call and ask what the purpose of the check was??? No they do not. That would be just as outrageous.

If you intentionally send someone money through your bank, electronically, or in check form, and you verify your intent to do so, the bank has zero responsibility if you got yourself ripped off by the person you sent it to.



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You're the one getting triggered over a simple innocuous question that you ultimately didn't have to answer yet was able to still send money. Maybe you have an anger problem?

What nefarious plan do you think they were hatching?
 

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HappyinID, you should be happy that your bank questions these transactions. Thousands of scams take place every day. Most banks cover your losses in the case of unauthorized transactions, so they are on the hook if the fraudulent transaction goes through.

I'm amazed about how many people fall for the wide range of scams I see out there.

The one that I cannot understand is when someone gets a call from someone claiming to be a friend or a grandchild or a cousin and claims to have been arrested in another state. They urgently need to borrow $5,000 for bail. The person is asked to either buy gift cards or traveler's checks in $500 or $1000 denominations, then mail them using overnight express to an out-of-state address. Every aspect of this should raise red flags. I don't understand how someone can claim to be a family member and the victim thinks it actually is a family member.

One of my friends fell for this one, even though he is normally a pretty savvy guy. In the case of my friend, the scammer started out the conversation with, "Do you know who this is?" My friend thought it was an old friend he had not seen in 20 years. He thought he was helping out an old buddy, even though the scammer never claimed to be that person. Stupid is as stupid does.

This month's issue of AARP magazine has an interesting article about inmates in prison who were scamming people via telephone to the tune of millions of dollars.
 
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