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Which is the better fig tree, celeste or brown turkey fig?

Two and a half years ago my grandkids and I planted a couple of brown turkey fig trees and a couple of Kadota fig trees.

Here in southeast Texas during the summer of 2015 we had a drought that lasted 3 months. During that time I did not keep the trees watered like I should of and 3 of the trees died.

Video of the original trees being planted.


I replaced the three dead trees and one more tree with two brown turkey figs and two celeste fig trees.

Video of the new fig trees.


I might be planting a couple of more fig trees. For those of you who have experience with the celeste and brown turkey fig please share your experiences.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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Celeste figs came in a couple weeks earlier than the brown turkey figs. Good when you have enough but when they first started bearing I had to freeze the celeste to wait for the brown turkeys to have enough to process. The celestes were sweeter than the brown turkey.

Celeste figs were a bit darker when ripe and I fight with the birds over fruit. The darker figs seem to have more bird problems. (Best for that problem was a light colored fig developed in Louisiana, the name escapes me right now.)

The celeste trees seemed to grow faster by a small bit than the brown turkeys but that could simply have been placement. I don't know about watering. The Florida sand means water everything frequently if you want it to live. :cool:
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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Which is the better fig tree, celeste or brown turkey fig?

Two and a half years ago my grandkids and I planted a couple of brown turkey fig trees and a couple of Kadota fig trees.

Here in southeast Texas during the summer of 2015 we had a drought that lasted 3 months. During that time I did not keep the trees watered like I should of and 3 of the trees died.

Video of the original trees being planted.

Planting fig trees with the grandkids - YouTube

I replaced the three dead trees and one more tree with two brown turkey figs and two celeste fig trees.

Video of the new fig trees.

Had to replant fig trees - YouTube

I might be planting a couple of more fig trees. For those of you who have experience with the celeste and brown turkey fig please share your experiences.
Figs usually put down roots much larger than the crown in the first few years. Mulch the living daylights out of them, and they shouldn't need to be watered. Ever. A 6' tall fig tree probably has 8' deep roots. Deeper if grown in a dry climate.
 

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Figs usually put down roots much larger than the crown in the first few years. Mulch the living daylights out of them, and they shouldn't need to be watered. Ever. A 6' tall fig tree probably has 8' deep roots. Deeper if grown in a dry climate.
I have had trouble getting my figs to do anything. I have not mulch them to speak off and about 18 inches down is a clay, then gravelly with rock hard pan. I have some new cuttings that budding out, maybe I need to make a mound at least a foot of soil and mulch to get make them happy. I get 60" average rain fall and I live on a hill.
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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I have had trouble getting my figs to do anything. I have not mulch them to speak off and about 18 inches down is a clay, then gravelly with rock hard pan. I have some new cuttings that budding out, maybe I need to make a mound at least a foot of soil and mulch to get make them happy. I get 60" average rain fall and I live on a hill.
Try sterile comfrey. Bocking 14 or Bocking 4. It breaks up solid ledge. Give it 2 years to set down solid (2-3" thick, 8-10' long) roots. All the while, much the entire area with 6-12" of ramial wood chips.

The second year of the system, plant alfalfa starts througout. Seeds likely won't sprout as well as you would like. You can also plant lupine and other deep-rooted plants. Top off the mulch.

By the start of the third year, you should be able to plant figs and other fruit and nut trees. You can likely, by that point, also plant herbs and other pest-repellent ground covers.

Over the years, as the trees grow, you will create a humus-rich, moisture-retentive ecosystem with much better drainage, without having to do any engineering.
 

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Try sterile comfrey. Bocking 14 or Bocking 4. It breaks up solid ledge. Give it 2 years to set down solid (2-3" thick, 8-10' long) roots. All the while, much the entire area with 6-12" of ramial wood chips.

The second year of the system, plant alfalfa starts througout. Seeds likely won't sprout as well as you would like. You can also plant lupine and other deep-rooted plants. Top off the mulch.

By the start of the third year, you should be able to plant figs and other fruit and nut trees. You can likely, by that point, also plant herbs and other pest-repellent ground covers.

Over the years, as the trees grow, you will create a humus-rich, moisture-retentive ecosystem with much better drainage, without having to do any engineering.
I did not understand all of it but getting better and more soil humus is a goal. Many useful trees grow well just as things are. So far for nut trees only blight resistant chestnuts and oak grow well which is fine. Pears grow ok as do disease resistant apple. But fig and mulberries are not as happy here.
I will study what you wrote and keep on the alert for similar soil improvement methodology.
I have large brush piles that are gradually rotting/composing down. Those might be useful sights for planting things in the future.
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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I did not understand all of it but getting better and more soil humus is a goal. Many useful trees grow well just as things are. So far for nut trees only blight resistant chestnuts and oak grow well which is fine. Pears grow ok as do disease resistant apple. But fig and mulberries are not as happy here.
I will study what you wrote and keep on the alert for similar soil improvement methodology.
I have large brush piles that are gradually rotting/composing down. Those might be useful sights for planting things in the future.
Break them up and spread them as mulch. It will loosen your clay soil and promote earthworms to spread the humus trough the clay.
 

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patriarch
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I don't know much about fig trees, but fig pudding is good! An old recipe my wife gleaned from her school lunch room. You know when schools actually cooked dinners? I would call it more like a soggy cake. Figs were used in the filling and the juice they were canned in was made into a glaze/icing poured over the top. Ummmmmmmmm :)
 

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Break them up and spread them as mulch. It will loosen your clay soil and promote earthworms to spread the humus trough the clay.
when I moved in here about 25 years ago earthworms were rare. But I also leave the fallen leaves on the ground as well as branches or grass I cut so it all decomposes here. The soil has gotten better. Previously it was a pine plantation and was regularly burned about every 3 yrs or so.
 

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Deo iuvante
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I planted several fig types a couple of years ago and only the two brown turkeys have survived. Up here it's cold during the winter and dry (9" annual rain), but the trees are on a timed drip line. The figs died back to the roots the first two years because I failed to insulate them before the first cold snap. But they grew back surprising well last year, growing to a bit over four feet from roots in a single year. I'm waiting to see if they've survived the winter this year. One of these years I will get it right.
 

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I planted several fig types a couple of years ago and only the two brown turkeys have survived. Up here it's cold during the winter and dry (9" annual rain), but the trees are on a timed drip line. The figs died back to the roots the first two years because I failed to insulate them before the first cold snap. But they grew back surprising well last year, growing to a bit over four feet from roots in a single year. I'm waiting to see if they've survived the winter this year. One of these years I will get it right.
The is at least one very cold hardy fig: Chicago Hardy fig.
Stark Brothers Chicago Hardy fig.
Description
Also called bensonhurst purple fig

Productive and easy to grow. Bears delicious medium-size figs. Exhibits drought-tolerance once established. May die back in colder climates and resume growth in spring. Bears fruit early on new growth. Fruit produced on the older wood will appear in early summer and fruit on new growth will appear in early fall. Ripe fruit has a dark mahogany color. Originates from Sicily. Grows well in containers! Heat-tolerant. Ripens in July through frost. Self-pollinating. Zone Range 5 - 10
 

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Village idiot
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Celeste is the "Old-fashioned" country fig of the South. Grandma's tree was more than likely "Celeste" if you are from a part of Old Confederacy". Most of the newer varieties including Turkey have come more recently. Many of them are better suited to a particular climate but Kev will be well satisfied with "Celeste".
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I have had trouble getting my figs to do anything. I have not mulch them to speak off and about 18 inches down is a clay, then gravelly with rock hard pan.
That's the problem we have here. Many years back we had an awesome fig tree. It took no work and produced bumper crops every year. I never knew the variety, but it was a dark fig. Anyway, it wasn't able to set down deep roots so it had to be watered during the hot, dry part of summer. One year the wind just blew it over. It didn't have the root base to carry the load.
 

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All over Europe
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We have Brown Turkey growing fantastically in the clay soil of Somerset, England. Two of them, facing south, growing against the stone wall of the house.

Fresh, in Fig Newton biscuits, Figgy Pudding, all good!
 
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