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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I am looking for a Good quality Cast iron stove to purchase new if possibele but i will look for second hand if available, does anyone have a recommendation for a wood stove to heat one large room if needed?
Something that is built correctly and will last years is what i am interested in and also heats efficiently and also not extra large.
Any brands that are preferred over others?

Thank you !
 

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reluctant sinner
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As kid I used a cast iron Franklin, not a very good stove. I have used a Taiwan Jodul, it was good stove. I re-assembled it with furnace cement. A few small fires in it to burn off the paint while it was outside, was fine after that. "Boxwood stove" at the china places.

I have larger steel wood stove "Jones" the fore runner of Timberline/ Flat top, brick lined, big door with glass insert, air tight. Been using it 25 plus years, no issues. Stainless steel pipe is still good. My first roof jack lasted 12 years. Then the snow/ice ripped it off my metal roof. The next one lasted 2 years. I got tired of that 2# POS and built an 80# unit out of angle iron and 10 gauge steel that is both welded and bolted together. My unit is still here 15 years on the job.

If you can run the chimney straight vertical and exit the roof at or near the peak.

$300

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/p...MI1t6-3Pfx6wIVFRvnCh3OewsqEAQYASABEgL19PD_BwE
 

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Does not have to be cast iron to last and likely be better choices that are not cast iron.
The old Fisher wood stoves were more or less lifetime stoves and they only had a cast iron door with the rest heavy steel. There are many good choices, both old and new.
 

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Fisher stoves are made of heavy steel plate, all welded and lined with firebrick. People actually collect them. I have two, one in the basement, the other in the garage.

You can get a crusty one on craigslist or FB marketplace for under $200. Put another $100 in paint and new firebrick and you have basically a new stove.

I would look for a newer, UL listed model.

Here's a site dedicated to them with lots of information. https://www.hearth.com/talk/forums/fisher-stove-information-parts-history-and-more.28/
 

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Jotul makes good stoves , the 602 is a great looking stove but I’ve allways need more heat for a larger space .
The down size to the smaller stoves is that you have to keep feeding them .
I would try to find a stove with a 2 cubic foot fire box so you stand a chance of holding a fire over night after a few months of burning you won’t want to relite it every morning.
I’m using a hearth stone equinox now it’s cast iron and soap stone.
They make some really nice smaller stoves .
Get a stove one size up from there specs for your sq foot you won’t be sorry.
 

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My family has used vermont castings stoves for 35 yrs for our primary heat. Typically we start the wood stove in Oct and it dosnt go out until March. For heating get a big stove. You can always build a smaller fire. Getting up every 3hrs to fill the stove really sucks
 

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Buy a good stove:

When we first moved to MO, got a nice large cast iron stove for the 3 room cabin... laid up 4 cords of wood (2-3 year old tops). Was out of wood by Christmas, had to get up in the middle of the night to keep the cabin above freezing. Bought an "airtight" firebrick lined sheet metal circulating "Ashley" knock off, and stoked twice a day, burned just over a cord for the rest of the year. Used 5 more years.

Moved and left the stove. Have had two more fire brick lined stoves since, one 1/4" steel plate, and one cast iron Swedish stove kinda like a Jotul. Still using the latter, moved the former to storage a few years ago when we put in an outdoor boiler to heat the water tubing in the floors (warm floors are nice, and with the radiant heat from all house floors can keep the house cooler and still be comfortable). Plan to put the plate stove in a greenhouse soon to be built. Both are over 30 years old now.
 

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We bought a steel stove about 10 years ago...i used to burn 5 cords a winter to keep 3k square ft warm....worked well...steel stoves can run at 700 degrees....try to heat cast iron at 500...good luck..,I don’t use wood that much, but I have it for back up SHTF......you can always find wood....no one ever said ...i have free pellets...🤔
 

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High Concept
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You might be better off with a modern one.



Stove top and oven.

I have a copper pipe element in the fire box to heat the hot water for the house.

You can cook your veggies on the stove top and roast or bake meats in the oven, and all while your kettle is on the stove as well.
 

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We have an older Jotul 602 in our off-grid camp...approx 400 sqft. It's an awesome stove but in winter, needs to be filled a few times during the night to keep the place comfortable. The firebox is small, so that has to be taken into consideration when putting up wood for the winter.

The 602 replaced an older Morso that took up took more floor space. Even with the smaller firebox, I have never regretted changing stoves.

At home, we have a Jotul F-500 Oslo. We've had it since 2007. There was a definite learning curve for me since it's different from the old box stoves I had grown up with. Once I got familiar with its operation, I love it. It heats our split-level house very well (approx 2000 sqft).
 

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I agree that cast iron will crack if it gets too hot. I'd also suggest a stove that is at least 16" deep from door to the back of the stove so it will handle a 16" log. 16" is pretty standard length for firewood cutting. And as stated, you can always build a small fire and yes, getting up in the middle of the night to build a fire sucks ass.
Depending on your budget, Vogelzang makes a decent stove that won't break the bank. If you've got the bank, Hitzer is an Amish made stove that seems popular, but pricey.
 

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We bought a steel stove about 10 years ago...i used to burn 5 cords a winter to keep 3k square ft warm....worked well...steel stoves can run at 700 degrees....try to heat cast iron at 500...good luck..,I don’t use wood that much, but I have it for back up SHTF......you can always find wood....no one ever said ...i have free pellets...🤔
That may be true about cheap cast iron cracking. I peg my gauge out past 700* at least once per year. I get it burning to at least 500* once every other week to help burn the creosote out.

I have also seen many many warped steel stoves. More than I have seen quality cast iron stoves that are cracked.
 

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I agree that cast iron will crack if it gets too hot. I'd also suggest a stove that is at least 16" deep from door to the back of the stove so it will handle a 16" log. 16" is pretty standard length for firewood cutting. And as stated, you can always build a small fire and yes, getting up in the middle of the night to build a fire sucks ass.
Depending on your budget, Vogelzang makes a decent stove that won't break the bank. If you've got the bank, Hitzer is an Amish made stove that seems popular, but pricey.
Vogelzang is just about bottom of the barrel of the wood stove world. Anything stove you buy at a big box store I would stay away from. Also stay away from any stove that you load from the front, has a horizontal diverter plate and the chimney in the back. These stoves burn from the front to the back. Making it necessary to rake the coals around every time you add wood.

Top load with an ash tray are the easiest to use. You just keep adding ontop or even off to the side if you want a small fire. An ash tray allows you to never let the stove go out.
 

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NRA Life 1971
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My family has used vermont castings stoves for 35 yrs for our primary heat. Typically we start the wood stove in Oct and it dosnt go out until March. For heating get a big stove. You can always build a smaller fire. Getting up every 3hrs to fill the stove really sucks


Vermont casting Defiant 40+ yrs. here.
 

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Don't know if still made, but when I lived in New Hampshire our farmhouse had a locally-produced "Warner" cast-iron stove which was an end-loader that would take 30-inch logs, had a 2-burner cook top and 10-gallon water boiler with spigot which could be used to fill buckets for the wringer-washer.
 

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We had Vermont castings in the late 70s....my old man drove to the factory to get it in our 78 dodge van...I think we had the resolute....top load cast iron...the technology is better now....we have a lennox steel and it’s designed to actually burn the smoke iirc....first liner scrub...1 handful of crap....6 yrs....
 
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