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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having and carrying cordage or rope is a must in a survival situation. I just never really developed the skill on how to wind cordage and carry it without tangling it in my bag. This is a primitive skill that I lacked. I really wanted to make sure that when packing either my BOB or just camping that I didn't spend excess energy fighting a tangled mess or rope/cordage.

I had my buddy, Survivor Johnny do a quick video demonstration on how to wind and carry rope. He uses 550 cord as a demonstration but I learned a lot in a short period of time. I hope this simple quick video helps others like me.

 

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Good info in case anyone is having similar problems. I've used a variation on that for years for carrying 100 foot lengths. I wind it using my hand to grip it, running it around the elbow of the same arm a number of times and then fold it over, leaving about 3 feet of cord to wind around the folded coil. Winding the remaining 3 feet neatly and tightly and applying an overhand knot around the coil as a last step keeps it all in place until needed. Another method that takes a little longer is to use a daisy-chain braid like with utility ropes and long electrical extension cords. This works well with 550 and larger cords and utility rope.

www.threesixtyosi.com
 

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Too young 2 feel this old
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For fast easy access you can daisy chain the 550 cord, push it into a .5L water bottle with the loose end toward the opening, punch a small hole in the lid, feed the tag end through and tie a quick overhand knot, and screw the lid on. As long as the hole you punch isn't too big it acts as a friction fit so the cord won't slide out and all you have to do is pull in the free end when needed. you can easily keep 50' in the bottle.
 

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For rope I coil it then near one end push a loop through the coil, over the top and cinch it in place.
For para cord the most compact form I have found is to coil it,and wind one end around it, over its length, to compress it into a cylinder then do the loop through and cinch one one end.

Secure to gear with Velcro or ranger (bike inner tube) bands.

Enjoy!
 

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For rope I coil it then near one end push a loop through the coil, over the top and cinch it in place.
For para cord the most compact form I have found is to coil it,and wind one end around it, over its length, to compress it into a cylinder then do the loop through and cinch one one end.

Secure to gear with Velcro or ranger (bike inner tube) bands.

Enjoy!
TOO EASY DRILL SERGEANT!
(that's exactly what I do)
 

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Winter is coming.
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For rope I coil it then near one end push a loop through the coil, over the top and cinch it in place.
For para cord the most compact form I have found is to coil it,and wind one end around it, over its length, to compress it into a cylinder then do the loop through and cinch one one end.

Secure to gear with Velcro or ranger (bike inner tube) bands.

Enjoy!
Yep me too.

Heres the animated version...

http://www.animatedknots.com/coilin...ge=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

I also carry most of my cordage in pre-cut lengths. I colour code them with different colours of paracord so i grab a black coil and thats 3' or grab a coyote coil and i know thats 5' or grab an OD coil and thats 10'. Takes up a little more space, but means i'm not working with a pile of spaghetti and having to cut and seal everytime i wanna tie something down. Its much quicker and tidier to do small jobs.
 
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