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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I'm sure this has been discussed before but recently in my area there was controlled burn that caused a highway shut down. The shut down caused major traffic as everyone was taking the same alternative routes to get home, it was a mess. It wasn't that bad but it did really get me thinking about having a bag and some kind of items on hand. I have a truck and I'd be limited with space and hiding a bag, I'd hate have it stolen also! I have a half tactical shoulder size pack I was thinking I could pack under the seat and I would also like to hear some important/essential items that should be packed? Space is very limited and this is probably designed for the utmost important items to get me directly home.
 

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Not knowing the likely distance, but also assuming you live in Florida (?)...

1. Water for a hike in hot weather plus a small filter (e.g., Sawyer Squeeze) and a bottle of water purification tablets. Both available at Walmart for very little money. Wally world now sells chlorine dioxide tablets (in foil pack x 20; 1 per quart) as well as iodine tablets (in small glass bottle x 50; 2 per quart). The chlorine dioxide tabs will reliably kill more stuff, but the iodine tabs work as well. Have 2-3 quarts capacity (canteens, bottles, or bladder) that you can refill along the way.

2. Local map & a compass. In case your foot route has to change to unfamiliar territory or detours. Especially at night.

3. Whatever you think you might need for your feet (dependent upon distance of hump). Mole skin blister kit, spare socks, pair of sport insoles, small foot powder, etc. Job #1 is to walk home... so anything that happens to cripple feet = Mobility Kill.

4. LED headlamp or flashlight. If nothing else, for reading map or road/street signage at night.

5. Rain gear (jacket at least; possibly a small umbrella). Think afternoon thunderstorms or hurricanes.

6. Sun gear (wide brimmed hat, cheap spare sunglasses, neck cravat/scarf, sunscreen, long sleeves & pants to prevent sunburn). Again... an umbrella will keep the sun off of you just as well as it sheds rain.

7. Insect gear (DEET spray at a minimum). Mosquito Headnet if you expect to make RON (rest over night) for sleep. Light gloves (which will also be of use if you need to bust brush while walking).

8. Cash. For whatever you need to purchase along the way if power/ATMs/registers are out. At least enough for a taxi ride, food/drink, hotel room, or a bar tab.

9. Spare pair of broken-in hiking footwear (if you don't normally wear such while out and about). If you intend to mostly handrail roads and not carry a lot of crap... a decent pair of running/trail shoes will handle the job. I live in a more cold & snowy climate. So I keep a spare pair of insulated hiking boots in my vehicle kit (along with spare winter wool socks & snow gaiters). Just in case my daily footwear ain't up to that walk-all-the-way-home task.

10. An emergency meal. Could be a lifeboat ration (which stores pretty well in a hot vehicle). Or something like granola/trail mix. Honey in a squeeze bottle also keeps damn near forever. Freeze dried entrees. Add water, let soak, eat cold. They're fine that way. BTDT. A coupla meals if the distance is expected to be a multi-day hike. You just want foods that are storable more or less year round in a hot car. The items I mentioned will handle that.

11. A basic shelter. Could be a poncho & 550 cord. Could be that umbrella I mentioned. Could be a breathable bivy sack like this one:


Which is exactly the model I keep in my vehicle GHB. SOL offers it in blaze orange, but I like earth tone version better. Easier to hide with. You could lie down in a rain storm and still get some sleep. Very compact and very light weight.

For a 1+ day push, it might be unnecessary. You could probably find shelter inside of or in the lee of some structure or vehicle. But if you have to make an exhausting multi-day movement... the ability to sleep weatherproof and (mostly) insect free inside of a bivy sack would be valuable.

12. Something spare to wear when you get chilled or wet. Jungle sweater, mid-weight polypro top, windbreaker, fleece hat, etc.)

13. The other usual Boy Scout Be Prepared items: lighter, knife, fire starter, ibuprofen, caffeine tablets, cell phone, small first aid kit, etc.

14. If the distance is manageable, spare running shoes/shorts and a small hydro-bladder pack with pouch/pockets for both water and a few "get home" items. Just run/jog/walk home... as distance and physical shape allow.

15. If you're up near the frost line of the Panhandle... add some appropriate contingency winter stuff. Warmer jacket, poncho liner, light sleeping bag, ground pad, etc.

16. For serious weather (hurricane, flooding)... consider a coast guard approved flotation device: boating/fishing life jacket or water ski vest kept in the vehicle. Just in case you get caught in rising waters or have to swim across some water obstacle. Maybe a plastic bump/skate/bicycle helmet for the same scenario.

It's been awhile, but I was once pretty familiar with hiking Florida, both winter and summer. From Eglin to Tampa to Miami. The good thing is that, for most of the year, you don't need a lot of clothing/shelter items. The bad thing is all the weather, bugs, snakes, and water obstacles. Most especially the electrical storms, tornadoes, & hurricanes.

- Astronomy (former 11C2V)
 

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I’ve never had a problem keeping a GHB safe in a truck. My truck has some smaller storage bins under the rear seat and that’s where most of the contents are kept. There is more under the passenger seat. The at leaves the nearly empty bag laying flat on the floor. The bag is black and the windows have some tint. The end result is you couldn’t notice it from the outside if you tried.
 
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I've kept a bag in all my automobiles for years.

Remember the rules of 3 when you stock it. That being:
  • 3 hours without protection from the elements...absolutely essential.
  • 3 days without water...and may even be less time, considering the Florida heat indexes.
  • 3 weeks without food...and you may not even need to absolutely pack such, but it is still a good idea to pack something that will keep.
Going by what you stated in the OP, you likely won't be able to pack everything needed for a 72 hour excursion. Though you can stock it with items that you can utilize resources along the way, such as a few Coast Guard approved 4 oz. water packets and a Lifestraw.
 

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My get home bag continues to evolve as get more experience and/or training. Run a scenario with what you have and you’ll find out very quickly what’s worth rucking with you or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great information there and I'm located in the Space coast of Florida. I'll definitely look into a road map and I have a lensatic I can throw in there. The water supply is definitely an issue. I'll get another lifestraw and some tablets with a few bottles of water. Another ponhco will be on the list also. Thanks for sharing.
 
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Great information there and I'm located in the Space coast of Florida. I'll definitely look into a road map and I have a lensatic I can throw in there. The water supply is definitely an issue. I'll get another lifestraw and some tablets with a few bottles of water. Another ponhco will be on the list also. Thanks for sharing.
Having that information, you may consider another alternative source for potable water, particularly if freshwater is overrun with ocean water. A Lifestraw cannot be used to make ocean water or other salt water drinkable.

Smaller desalinators have some strides lately, but you should know how to do it manually. The following caught my attention last year, but I can't tell you anything about it: Handheld Desalinator to Go into Production
 

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Having that information, you may consider another alternative source for potable water, particularly if freshwater is overrun with ocean water. A Lifestraw cannot be used to make ocean water or other salt water drinkable.

Smaller desalinators have some strides lately, but you should know how to do it manually. The following caught my attention last year, but I can't tell you anything about it: Handheld Desalinator to Go into Production
Im goimg to have to look into that myself. Thanks.
 
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Having that information, you may consider another alternative source for potable water, particularly if freshwater is overrun with ocean water. A Lifestraw cannot be used to make ocean water or other salt water drinkable.

Smaller desalinators have some strides lately, but you should know how to do it manually. The following caught my attention last year, but I can't tell you anything about it: Handheld Desalinator to Go into Production
There are already several of them on the market. Katadyn makes one. I've seen others in various sizes.
 

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When contemplating what you need for a minimalist GHB don’t duplicate unnecessarily the gear you already may EDC on your person. My EDC carry is a Benchmade folding knife, a SAK executive mini for minor tasks, a Surefire Stiletto rechargeable flashlight, a couple pens & 3x5 index card notebook, business cards in a holder with a microfiber cloth to clean glasses, iPhone, keys & a little pocket change plus my wallet with ID, credit cards and usually a couple hundred in cash. My GHB/EDC bag is a Tom Bihn Pilot shoulder bag with a water bottle nested into a small camping cup, a package of Biltong, a container of almonds, a pack of gum, roll of lifesavers and usually a couple RX bars for calories, important as I am diabetic, so I also have my testing kit & insulin injection pens in a small zippered case. Also sunglasses, neck gaiter/mask, a titanium spork & an Izula knife for culinary chores, if lighter x2, pack of baby wipes to stay clean, small trauma kit, some OTC meds (Tylenol, sinus pills) plus a battery bank & charging cables to keep my phone & flashlight charged. I need to add a good head lamp to this as well as my old one crapped out and hands free light is invaluable. The bag is fairly lightly packed, and will fit behind the compact rear seat of the Tacoma. I also keep other gear in my vehicle, a Toyota Tacoma Double Cab pickup. Each door holds 2 water bottles, plus usually a couple more in the cup holders, plus a 20oz Yeti for coffee & 30oz for cold drinks, both with mag lids. I also keep a rain jacket, Carhart vest, fleece, several hats. Not to imention a box of face masks & another of nitrile gloves. I always wear good socks & shoes capable of walking/hiking. I can add as needed from that gear as there is spare room in my bag. This is NOT a BOB, but does give me the needed items to get home or get by for a day or so if need be.
 
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There are already several of them on the market. Katadyn makes one. I've seen others in various sizes.
I've seen quite a few myself, but many are size and/or cost prohibitive for a BOB.

The one I previously mentioned, seems to be of a reasonable price and size.
 

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Another ponhco will be on the list also.
Instead of an umbrella, I'd have a rain poncho that doubles as shelter. Remember to have some paracord also. It covers the backpack during rain and works as a camo cover too if necessary.

Actually I would still keep an umbrella in the car, it is still faster and simpler to use when you just want to stay dry when moving out of the car.
 

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I would suggest everyone configure/load their car up AS a bob. A good starting point is being able to live out of it for x amount of days, in hot or cold. Water and filtering ability, tools necessary to acquire food, protection, at a minimum.

I have a bob, actually 2 but the 4 door pu is also a self contained bob, thoughtfully configured and inventoried.
 

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Having that information, you may consider another alternative source for potable water, particularly if freshwater is overrun with ocean water. A Lifestraw cannot be used to make ocean water or other salt water drinkable.

Smaller desalinators have some strides lately, but you should know how to do it manually. The following caught my attention last year, but I can't tell you anything about it: Handheld Desalinator to Go into Production
If that Desalinator actually becomes an affordable product, I will buy one. Almost a must-have for anyone with a boat.
 

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I carry a 72 hr bag in my BOV with food, shelter, water filter, hammock and much more. It weighs less than 10 pounds and when combined with my EDC and a canteen of water it should get me out of where ever I was that I had to abandon my ride.
 
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If that Desalinator actually becomes an affordable product, I will buy one. Almost a must-have for anyone with a boat.
It appears that they will begin to be shipped in July 2021, for under $150.
 

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Would not any common under the counter R/O unit remove the salt from seawater?

They have sold fresh water units for sailboats for many years now that work only from being towed through the water by the sailboat.
 
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