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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At this present time, owning a cannon would be frowned upon, but after it has all gone to hell in a hand cart & there is no longer any law enforcement to protect us:rolleyes:, then anything goes, right? So, if you are looking for some big guns, now is the time to get them. You can pick up hydraulic rams for a song second hand, sometimes totally free. It will take very little modification to turn one of these into a Black Powder cannon. I am sure if you look at the images below you will instantly see the potential:D: Just remove the piston!

Keith.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Australia, NOT America.

Wow. Frowned upon? By who?

My new 2 1/2" 10lb Cannon Arrived Today.

Looks like if you want a Cannon, you can get one.

One would need a fairly high-pressure hydraulic cylinder to withstand any substantial charge.
We are in Australia, not America. We can't even own a matchlock pistol unless we have an "H" class licence with club membership & the only place it can be used is on the club range.

Well I was looking at a hydraulic cylinder a few weeks back, & it was huge. I think it would take a large overload of black powder to blow it up.
Keith.
 

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We are in Australia, not America. We can't even own a matchlock pistol unless we have an "H" class licence with club membership & the only place it can be used is on the club range.

Well I was looking at a hydraulic cylinder a few weeks back, & it was huge. I think it would take a large overload of black powder to blow it up.
Keith.
You can own cannons in Australia, normal category A firearm most states, same as a single barrel shotgun or 22LR. They limited the bore in QLD to 2" and less than 48" barrel. But you can still throw a decent load from that, almost two pounds of shot. 70 x 50 cal lead balls will slow down assailants. :thumb:
 

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I am not sure how a black powder cannon would be helpful in a defensive role. It would have to be an awfully specific use. The US military hardly ever used artillery in post invasion Iraq.

But for fun factor they can't be beat.
 

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@OP, instead of vintage canon why not using bow & arrow?
A solid hit from bodkin arrowhead that has been treated with venom is extremely lethal
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you.

You can own cannons in Australia, normal category A firearm most states, same as a single barrel shotgun or 22LR. They limited the bore in QLD to 2" and less than 48" barrel. But you can still throw a decent load from that, almost two pounds of shot. 70 x 50 cal lead balls will slow down assailants. :thumb:
Many thanks for that info sixtus, I will have to look into that.
Regards, Keith.
 

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I am not sure how a black powder cannon would be helpful in a defensive role. It would have to be an awfully specific use. The US military hardly ever used artillery in post invasion Iraq.

But for fun factor they can't be beat.
Perhaps on a timer, set to cover a particular access point, like inside a gate. Bad guys break through the gate, you set off a cannon full of scrap and chop them to bits.

But improvised claymores are lighter, easier to make and more portable.
 

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Another situation would be to drive attackers out of a place where they are immune to direct fire. In this case the tube would be used more like a mortar. Projectiles would have to be large enough to be dangerous with just freefall velocity and stabilized probably by fins to have some accuracy.

There are cannons being made for play that have bores sized to fit soda cans filled with cement.
 

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Another situation would be to drive attackers out of a place where they are immune to direct fire. In this case the tube would be used more like a mortar. Projectiles would have to be large enough to be dangerous with just freefall velocity and stabilized probably by fins to have some accuracy.

There are cannons being made for play that have bores sized to fit soda cans filled with cement.
A cheaper and easier method is to plan your defence so you identify areas of dead ground, and cover them with claymores and/or CCTV, or other obstacles. I don't fancy the idea of trying to develop an improvised mortar. It took the IRA decades to manage that.
 

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A cheaper and easier method is to plan your defence so you identify areas of dead ground, and cover them with claymores and/or CCTV, or other obstacles. I don't fancy the idea of trying to develop an improvised mortar. It took the IRA decades to manage that.
That is what I was thinking.

For a cannon to be useful it would have to be worth being exposed to small arms fire to operate it and yet the threat would have to be close enough to determine it is a deadly threat to engage it. Then you would have all the rules of gun safety to worry about.
 

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A cheaper and easier method is to plan your defence so you identify areas of dead ground, and cover them with claymores and/or CCTV, or other obstacles. I don't fancy the idea of trying to develop an improvised mortar. It took the IRA decades to manage that.
What you're talking about has a modern title. It's called an IED and comes in all shapes and sizes. Creates lots of government interest. :taped:
 

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Okay, thanks everyone. I think it is unanimous, cannons are a bad idea.
Keith.
I always though they could be an okay idea for corridors of fire or covering approaches on open ground. An array of even small falconet size( 2 pounders) could lay down serious hurt and deterrance.

The issue is how quickly you can load them, or leave them loaded.

Eg can cannons be left loaded reliably for several days or longer? Can they be unloaded without having to fire them?
 

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There is or was a wwII Matilda tank for sale down your way, which while neat enough on its own ,she was a rare one. Known as a Matilda Frog. They were flamethrower tanks. This one was used in combat with Aussie Army and seems to be in good condition if I remember right.

Nothing says "get off my lawn" like 30 tons of armored fire breathing fury.
 

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Okay, thanks everyone. I think it is unanimous, cannons are a bad idea.
Keith.
Actually, it is not unanimous, or a bad idea. At least in my opinion. Black powder cannon, along with literally dozens, if not hundreds, of other types of, and specific weapons not generally considered for prepper use, even in the PAW, can have a role.

So much of who, what, when, where, why, and how are going to be very situation specific, so discussion about these types of things have valid points on both sides, for every SINGLE situation. That does not mean that other situations would not be completely different, and different conclusions reached.

One of the points I try to make as a person that believes in having options, is that almost always it is better to have something than not have it, as long as it is legal at the moment to have the pieces and parts at least even if not the item; it is not used before the PAW/WROL comes about; it/they do not cause some other significant lack in preps due to the obtaining, holding, and using them; they are depended on solely, without planning and using other methods in concert; and they are not dangerous to oneself, family, or friends if stored and used properly.

I have participated in several discussion here and elsewhere (and not participated in even more than I did participate in), where things like this have been brought up, almost always with a huge negative reaction. Cannon; mechanical siege weapons; some unmentionables that got mentioned anyway; boats/ships; fixed wing, rotary wing, and lighter than air aircraft; fortifications; and many more I will not waste time listing.

And I... although advocated is not the right word... at least tried to present the information that just about every one of them could be used by the person bringing it up, in their situation, or by some one in a similar situation, with the same needs. Often training would have to be done, and investment made, other preparations made in addition, and even then, if that particular situation did not occur, whatever it was might not ever be needed.

But that is always true about many of the things preppers do.

This is my long, round about, rather preachy, way of saying, yes, black powder cannon can have a place in a prepper's arsenal and planning. I can visualize many situations where they would be useful.

1. Defensive fire on a pass, bridge, ford, or choke point that is too far to bring enough firepower onto to make a difference, pre-placing the means to defend it are not possible, the available manpower makes defending the place other ways too dangerous, or having any other type of effective defense is not legal or too expensive.

2. Psychological impact. There will be very few people, especially people with the mindset of raiders, mobs, and self-styled 'we should control everything for the good of all' types, will not be expecting long range, or even short range, artillery fire of any kind, in any situation. It does not matter if some of the types of cannon and/or projectiles they fire might not be all that effective, one soda can of concrete through the windshield of 'your' vehicle is going to make a huge impression and put the fear of God (or cannon fire) into them, making it must less likely they will continue the attack. Or come back and try again. (Although that is always a risk once a 'secret weapon' is no longer secret.

3. Use of other types of projectiles. A cannon, for the lack of some other things, and the multi-purpose uses it has, can be used for creating avalanches, damage or destroy key makeshift defenses, reach some places direct fire cannot, lay much greater amounts of force on various things than hand weapons, can launch LTL projectiles like nets, smoke projectiles, some vary nasty gaseous materials, flame/fire producing projectiles, etc. (Now, most of them require a great deal of knowledge and skill. But if those are available, then they are an option.)

4. 'Gate' protection. The US military often had a cannon aimed at the main gate of western forts. Since most attackers, even back then, often had a familiarity bias to use the gate to gain entry, rather than other methods, if the gate was breached at least one round, usually a canister round, and sometimes a second, that often broke off the attack. As was stated, cannon fire down a restricted path or approach can be deadly. Just like machine gun fire in WW I was set up to cover the few, limited, and know approaches the enemy would have to take. When you are approaching, literally under the gun, you often do not approach once you find out the hard way what you are facing.

5. Indirect fire. Even if not used with mortar-like angles, elevated barrels can fire over some significant rises. And the cannon mount does not even have to be set up to do it. It was not usually possible, even if thought about, to have ramps and such arranged to be able to elevate the muzzle end of a cannon much higher than the carriage was capable of doing. Just by elevating the carriage on a slope, you have the same effect, and the cannon can still be loaded just as it is on level ground.

I can think of many other situations where a cannon can be of use. But, there are always trade-offs. Do not acquire one and everything needed for it, and not obtain the rest of the preps that are definitely going to be necessary. Water, food, and so on.

Having the means to only make a handful of shots make the idea of having the cannon much less desirable. The means to make black powder pretty much has to be a part of the whole process. So does the ability to make the projectiles. And other than some very small cannon, this is not lead. Lots of other things, including rocks of approximately the right size, smoothed with tools, or wrapped with padding to fit the bore. The tools to load, clean, maintain, adjust, and otherwise use the cannon must be obtained and training done. A study of ballistics is mandatory. You do not just aim the can in the direction of the target. The elevation, powder charge based on range and payload, windage, and though earth's rotation will not need to be factored in the way it is with larger and longer range cannon, there are some other things that do have to be considered, such as humidity.

I would have cannon, along with various siege engines, to protect my place, if I was at all able.

Just my opinion.
 

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I agree with Jerry. What I am trying to find out is how long cannon can stay loaded for, and how easy they can be unloaded.

Having them ready is obviously the preference, trying to load them during assaults is more problematic.

So can they be loaded and left for several days or more? Or can they be emptied and reloaded fresh each day/week to ensure they are always capable of firing?
 

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We used one in re-enactments. Usual projectile was a baby food jar full of concrete. They could be loaded the night before, if there was a reason to do so. Cleaning one of these after firing is an interesting experience.
 
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