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Clever ain't wise.
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Anyone have experience with glass canning lids on old mason jars?

Are these advantageous because they can be reused? Do they have an indefinite life span?

Also wondering how they traditionally sealed them?
 

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I think they still had some type of rubber sealor other type of seal, maybe cork. Makes sense if you can find the seals. That is what they used in the 1800's and early 1900's. From what I read, some French chefs for Napoleon developed canning so they could store food for the army. Otherwise they had to "live off the land" except for dry goods and jerkey. Since they didn't have pressure canning, they canned meat by boiling for 6-8 hours. They didn't know why it preserved the meat, but it did. I think they used this type of glass but I don't know how they sealed the lids.
 

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Cat Herder
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My wife and I inherited a big quantity of the Glass Top Bale Jars when we bought our old Farmhouse. We were able to find the rubber replacement seals online (Amazon, methinks). The challenge came when we went to use them. All of the canning overlords pooh-poohed them because supposedly, there's no way to be sure you have a proper seal (no metal or plastic lid to "pop"). As a result, we've only used them for dry storage of grains and beans on our Baker's Rack. At the time, we were only Water Bath Canners. Now that we have a few more miles under our belts, and are pressure canning more, we may re-visit them.
 

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Chicken Collector
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They're not really that old. You can find them under the name 'European canning jars' or their major manufacturer; Weck. Both Lehmans and Lee Valley sell them.

Unfortunately they're very expensive compared to Ball jars. But the seals are reusable.
 

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Watched their video. I'm sold! Haha. Not real wild about plastic for canning though, that's the only thing.
Me neither on the plastic, but the silicone rings are reputed to last much longer than the rubber rings on the other brand. I would use them on quick turnover items like pinto beans that I am constantly canning. I should do another batch tomorrow, down to one jar and the grand kids like their refried beans (I just can the beans and mash them on reheat).
 

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just sell the jars .... you'll make twice, three, or four times the cost of a regular Ball jar .... why screw around trying to use old technology when dealing with a health involved issue ....
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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We have a bunch of them. Rubber gaskets are available in grocery stores and hardware stores.

My wife uses them mostly for high-acid stuff, and for things that are self-preserving.

Things pickled in vinegar do not require vacuum sealing. Which is why many table condiments are in a vinegar base, so they do not require refrigeration.

Also salt-brine stuff [though it is smart to avoid high nitrate brines].
 

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Homesteader
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I bought a stockpile of Tattler but have not yet tried them. I'm hoping they would be a safeguard for a time when regular mason jar lids may not be available. I do have some concerns that the gaskets might not hold up in long term storage but I have the same concerns with the regular lids.

Being reusable, the Tattlers might buy you a few years in the event of a shortage.

FB, I'm glad to hear of some of the caveats and also the uses of the old rubber ring lids/jars. I still have some too and the area in which I live, quite rural and well populated by Mennonite communities, the stores do still carry the rubber rings. They are not quite as old as early 1900's. I remember my mother using them up to the mid 1900's (War Years) and then the major switchover to bands and lids came about that time and maybe before that but their use was still not as uncommon as they are now.



NC Hippy, I just looked at the 4ever link and I'm impressed with their claims and guarantee. Now I'll have to save up a couple hundred bucks and order and try some. If they work reliably that is a good answer for my requirements. It will only take a couple of re-uses to pay for the cost of them compared to one time steel lids.
 

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We tried some of the Weck jars and had very bad luck with them. Wife bought them cheap at a yard sale. Maybe there was a reason they were cheap.

My own strategy for assuring that I will have lids for a long time is when I open a jar with a ball or kerr type lid is to do it carefully and then save the lid. I have reused a few of these used lids and they do reseal. How many times they will reseal I don't know, nor do I know if lids I have stored for a long time will reseal.
 

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Gypsy in the Midwest
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I bought a stockpile of Tattler but have not yet tried them. I'm hoping they would be a safeguard for a time when regular mason jar lids may not be available. I do have some concerns that the gaskets might not hold up in long term storage but I have the same concerns with the regular lids.

Being reusable, the Tattlers might buy you a few years in the event of a shortage.

FB, I'm glad to hear of some of the caveats and also the uses of the old rubber ring lids/jars. I still have some too and the area in which I live, quite rural and well populated by Mennonite communities, the stores do still carry the rubber rings. They are not quite as old as early 1900's. I remember my mother using them up to the mid 1900's (War Years) and then the major switchover to bands and lids came about that time and maybe before that but their use was still not as uncommon as they are now.



NC Hippy, I just looked at the 4ever link and I'm impressed with their claims and guarantee. Now I'll have to save up a couple hundred bucks and order and try some. If they work reliably that is a good answer for my requirements. It will only take a couple of re-uses to pay for the cost of them compared to one time steel lids.
One thing to note about old lids & old jars.... Check them very very well before you use them. I have some old ones that have air bubbles & other imperfections in the glass. They are fine for waterbath canning but I would not trust my old ones in a pressure canner.

And if you've ever had an explosion in your pressure canner of a jar breaking... You know what a hassle it is! (And It will scare the crap out of you!) :cool:
 

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What, me worry?
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Tell the truth, coward.
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My wife and I inherited a big quantity of the Glass Top Bale Jars when we bought our old Farmhouse. We were able to find the rubber replacement seals online (Amazon, methinks). The challenge came when we went to use them. All of the canning overlords pooh-poohed them because supposedly, there's no way to be sure you have a proper seal (no metal or plastic lid to "pop"). As a result, we've only used them for dry storage of grains and beans on our Baker's Rack. At the time, we were only Water Bath Canners. Now that we have a few more miles under our belts, and are pressure canning more, we may re-visit them.
They are a horror story.

The rubber rings perish with age and stick like glue to the glass lids. You have to attack them with a chisel to get them open.

Also: the vacuum seal is unreleasable. :) That's the fun bit. Unreleasable vacuum seal.

Just thought I should warn you.
 

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Homesteader
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They are a horror story.

The rubber rings perish with age and stick like glue to the glass lids. You have to attack them with a chisel to get them open.

Also: the vacuum seal is unreleasable. :) That's the fun bit. Unreleasable vacuum seal.

Just thought I should warn you.
I do remember them getting brittle and how hard they are to get off the glass at times.

I wish they'd make something like that in silicon for reusable lids.
 
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