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Who here has some recipes on canning squash and zucchini?

For fathers day I got a Presto 01370 8 quart pressure cooker. Then today my wife bought me a Presto 1745 16 quart pressure canner.

The squash and zucchini are still producing, which means I need to start canning.

How do you can your squash and zucchini? I am looking to can quart and pint jars.
 

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I have done it, but I didn't like the results. It pretty much turns to mush. It could be good possibly for things like casseroles, maybe?

I have used both yellow squash and zucchini to make pickles. Not bad at all! I also made zucchini relish once, but it was the first non-jam/jelly thing I canned, and I think I messed up on the spices because it was pretty gross, and I ended up dumping it.

The National Center for Home Food Preservation doesn't recommend it (http://nchfp.uga.edu/questions/FAQ_canning.html#24)

Here's this http://newlifeonahomestead.com/2011/07/how-to-can-squash-zucchini/
But you'll notice in the comments that the author states they haven't tried any of it yet!
She left an updated comment, 2 years after, saying that the really prefer fresh to canned, and probably wouldn't be canning any more since they primarily used the canned squash for baby food.

I don't think you're going to like the result, but if you are dead set on it, go a head and do a batch, and then open a jar and see what you think. But try it before you do jars and jars and jars of it!

Alternatively, you could try dehydrating it. I cut it in slices, drizzle with olive oil and sea salt, and make zucchini chips! Or slice it, dehydrate it, and grind it up into powder. Add it to soups and pasta for extra nutrition.
 

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DamnifIknow
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The "Ball Blue Book" doesn't even have a recipe for canning squash or zucchini in jars. The closest thing is a recipe for zucchini pickles. Maybe adding other vegis to make a soup would work.
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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This is how I've canned them. The old instructions from the late 60's and early 70's had inadequate processing times and when they were withdrawn, Ball and USDA never republished any guidelines. Canned squash and zucchini are pretty mushy but if you like squash casserole they work fine. Just cook the onions separately, then put the casserole together and bake it.

Back to canning: I'm going to say squash but squash and zucchini work the same way
This is for pints.

- Cut the squash into 3/4 to 1 inch squares.
- Put pieces in boiling water for 2 or 3 minutes, then pack into jars. They mush down when processing so pack them as tight as you can.
- Put 1 tsp. salt in the top of each jar then fill the jar with hot water, the water you blanched the squash in is fine.
- Do the normal jar finishing (cleaning edges, putting on lids, etc.) and process at 10 pounds for 40 minutes.

The only difference between pints and quarts is 2 tsp. salt for quarts and process for 50 minutes.

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Unasked for note:
I shred, blanch and dehydrate more squash and zucchini than I can because the canned is really limited in usage.
 

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Dehydrated is the way to go w/ squash. It dehydrates very well and I like the flavor better than fresh.

I slice it, dehydrate it then when I want to cook it; I soak it in cool water. I then dry w/ paper towels then batter w/ flour then fry it. Add a little salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The "Ball Blue Book" doesn't even have a recipe for canning squash or zucchini in jars. The closest thing is a recipe for zucchini pickles. Maybe adding other vegis to make a soup would work.
So if I can squash and zucchini it will turn into a slush.

Probably best not to go down this route?
 

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Peas and Carrots!
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So if I can squash and zucchini it will turn into a slush.

Probably best not to go down this route?
We love squash and I still put up no more than maybe a couple of canners full a year because it is limited in use. Slush is a good description.

Dehydrated, shredded squash you can make squash fritters, squash casserole, throw it into lasagna as an extra vegetable, etc. I throw a handful into a lot of casseroles in the winter especially if I'm cooking for the grandkids when "snuck in" vegetables help.

In July when fresh squash are everywhere, squash fritters are so-so in taste. In January when you'd love something like fried squash, squash fritters just melt in your mouth they taste so good.

Just an idea.
 

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The best way I've found is by making pickles out of them. I use summer squash and zucchini that are just smaller in diameter than the inside of a pint canning jar. Don't peel them. Slice them into thin rounds. Alternate the yellow squash and green zucchini rounds in the jars. Use whatever pickle recipe you like best. My family liked the dill, made with fresh dill, best but I also like them as bread and butter (sweet) pickles. You can make smaller slices, too, if you want. If you make the big rounds be sure and use a recipe that makes them crispy, cruncy. If you don't they get mushy. The green and yellow pickles make a pretty gift, too. Good luck!
 

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zucchini jam

Original recipe makes 12 pints
6 cups peeled, seeded, and shredded zucchini
6 cups white sugar
1 (15.25 ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained
1/2 cup lemon juice
1 (6 ounce) package strawberry[ or other flavor] flavored Jell-O® mix

Directions

Combine the zucchini, sugar, pineapple, and lemon juice in a large pot over medium heat. Boil mixture until the zucchini is clear; remove from heat. Add gelatin mix and stir until completely dissolved.
Ladle into hot, sterilized jars to within about 1/4 inch of the top. Seal, and process in a boiling water canner for 5 minutes.
 

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democrats = Hydra
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I have canned several batches of squash. I add tomato, which brings some zing to the flavor, and adds acid (most anti-canning advisements are based on the lack of acid squash brings to the table). it is mushy but still useable
 

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You talkin' to me?
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I make pickles out of them, better than cucumbers if you ask me. I use Mrs Wages pickleing mix, available at any Walmart and my local grocery store. Just beware any city/community water source, it contains stuff that will turn your pickles to mush, use only untreated well water or distilled water.
 

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My Temperature is Right
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Some things were never meant to be canned. Dried squash works great. Even thinking about canned squash still gives me the willys. It's like that great quote from "A Child's Garden of Grass" Profound Revelation-- "Although you may not like pickels, what else can you do with cucumbers?"
 

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Can WINTER squash the same way you would pumpkin pie filling. Not bad, but how many pumpkin pies can you eat?

American Indians dried their squash. I tried drying winter squash but it wasn't great. In her book "The Resiliant Gardener" Carol Deppie says that it was zucchini that they grew and dried. She recommends a specific variety that I can't remember. I am growing some this summer that I will try drying. Get her book it is worth the $.
 
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