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I am wanting to start canning for the first time in my life. I usually have a nice sized garden, and plenty of wild game that I would like to can. Does anyone have any books, or web sites that go into deep detail on how to do this safely?
 

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Fideli Certa Merces
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I am wanting to start canning for the first time in my life. I usually have a nice sized garden, and plenty of wild game that I would like to can. Does anyone have any books, or web sites that go into deep detail on how to do this safely?
Lessons I learned when I started (in no particular order):

1 - Google is your friend!

2 - The Ball Blue Book is a must - get it as soon as you can.

3 - Use common sense.


Good luck! :thumb:
 

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I want to can meat. I am confident at canning fruits and veggies, but have never tried meat and am still afraid to. My biggest question is this: if the meat is spoiled, will we know it before we eat it? I know salmonella is stealthy, but it won't survive canning, right?
 

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I want to can meat. I am confident at canning fruits and veggies, but have never tried meat and am still afraid to. My biggest question is this: if the meat is spoiled, will we know it before we eat it? I know salmonella is stealthy, but it won't survive canning, right?
ditto - same concern here - I got into canning 4 years ago & some of the stuff went bad after a year & longer and I followed the directions...

I've never tackled meat before, but it will definitely be necessary in the future.

I do remember the canning times are much, much longer for meat & I'm sure that is the reason. I'm also planning on cutting it into small cubes - the reason being that I won't have to worry about a cool spot in the middle of a piece of large meat.

Enough heat & time and you should be able to kill anything...
 

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Take a look at the Ask Jackie section at Back Woods Home. If you go to the BWH site and enter "canning" or "canning beef" or what ever into the search box it will pull up the relevant items. Jackie's posts are what got me to try canning. I started with beans and have now moved on to meat, poultry and will now can just about anything.

http://www.backwoodshome.com

http://www.backwoodshome.com/advice/advice.html

http://www.backwoodshome.com/search...000000;GFNT:0000FF;GIMP:0000FF;FORID:11&hl=en
 

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Use the above references, they will tell you what type of canning you need for acid based foods and bases. Yes there is a difference.
You will need a pressure cooker and a regular hotbath canner (all can be bought from wally world), make sure you buy canning tongs, and have a drying rack.
 

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I was reading this morning on caning meat. For most meat that is not ground you cube it or slice it into strips that will fit in the jar and add water or broth with a minimum of fats (fats will go rancid in time), cook it about 1/2-3/4 as long as you would for consumption then can it and it looks like 1 1/3 to 1 1/2 hour in the pressure cooker to finish things off.
If you are doing meat sauces things change as to time to cook and time to pressure cook. This is generalization and not be used to prepare your meats with!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Take a look at the Ask Jackie section at Back Woods Home. If you go to the BWH site and enter "canning" or "canning beef" or what ever into the search box it will pull up the relevant items. Jackie's posts are what got me to try canning. I started with beans and have now moved on to meat, poultry and will now can just about anything.

http://www.backwoodshome.com

http://www.backwoodshome.com/advice/advice.html

http://www.backwoodshome.com/search...000000;GFNT:0000FF;GIMP:0000FF;FORID:11&hl=en


This was a very helpful post. I have been a long time subscriber to Backwoods Home, and never thought about looking up the "Ask Jackie" articles. I have a few of the Anthologies, and I will look into those for a little more advice. Thanks for reminding me about this.
 

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I have friends that quarter a chicken and shove it into the jar, bones and all. When they are ready to use it, they pour off the stock and set it aside. The meat falls of the bone and it only takes a few seconds to pick through it. By doing this, you save a ton of time rather than trying to debone the bird with a knife while raw. The only thing you have to add is a pinch of salt. A slice or two of dehydrated garlic is good as well, it doesn't have that funky harsh taste that powderd stuff does. Most recipes benefit from some garlic anyway so it's best to have it cooked with the meat.

Add some veggies with your stock, cook up some rice and throw it all together. You've got a slow cooker meal in 20 minutes, with meat you (should've) bought on sale. Quarters are really good stew meat that go for next to nothing, too.
 

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+1 on JR2980's post about the blue ball book. This is what our family has used for time out of mind. The only suggestion I can give is make sure you check your cans, lids(ESPECIALLY the seals on the lids) and your canning pot to make sure everything is in running order.

To maryfrancis: You're right to be wary of canning meats, because if there is a crack in your sealant or a dimple in your lid you may end up with something you'll regret deeply later! Because of the temperature you can meats(I only do beef.. wouldn't trust chicken in any kind of situation), it kills pretty much ANYTHING- even parasites- which is why it takes so dang long to do. I would avoid canning ground beef, in any circumstance, simply because it gets gross when liquid is added(Not to mention ground beef is a germ-playground in most cases.. more surface area because of the grinding = yuckfest). Make sure to do your reading first, but canning meats is very safe if you take your time and follow instructions. :)

Our normal canned delight: 1 tbs corn starch, cubed pot roast, peas, green beans, pickled corn and okra, salt, pepper and red pepper(Flakes) plus garlic powder(Garlic is something you need to be wary of because of the high potential for botchelism). The salt and corn starch will gravy-fy over time, so it's a heat n' eat straight from the can. The longer it sits, the spicier it gets from the red pepper flakes.
 

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Here is a hot link to canning usa. They have several videos that are worth watching

CanningUSA

Here is a link to several canning videos
 
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