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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a canner just a small one with a weight 5 10 15 pounds!! I am a poor man survivalist!! I canned some MIX bean soup and it turned out great kinda hard to not just eat it all lol. Well the wife likes beef vegetable soup and need a good whole meal canning recipe for it! For that matter i would like any whole meal Canning recipes!!
 

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Shade Tree Gynecologist
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No whole meat canning recipes for you. I usually do stews, veg beef soup and other like items. I call them meals in a jar. I don't really follow any recipes
 

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Looks like rain to me.
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I'm not sure if the Ball Blue Book is copywrite material or not. You can get it at Wal Mart or Barnes & Noble etc.

Great reference
 

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nothing
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Is 10lb pressure pretty standard at regular elevation?

My canning experience is limited I've done pickles and a few other things years ago but I usually just dehydrate everything. Say you cook some soup/stew for dinner you eat it and then you want to can the leftovers in a few quart jars. Doesn't processing them for an hour and a half over cook the already cooked stew?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am pretty new at canning but what I just did was!! Prepared the soup for canning left a little of the un finished soup in pot and continued cooking!! Then processed the stuf i put in the jars!! Works out well for me! I dehydrate things also and smoke jerky! i am just thinking long term survival or rewind 100 years homesteading! I can make heat from multiple sources and I can grow things!! Most dehydrators are electric other then sun drying dehydrating to perserve foods I think canning is a good deal! obviously you can dehydrat your prep food storage but eventually that will run out! 10 is pretty standard just depends on what you are canning! Like I said I am new to canning myself so maybe someone else can enlighten us!!
Medical and first aid is my specialty!! Combat medic for 9 years with 3 tours!!
 

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I just fill a quart jar half full of meat, then top it off with a mix of potatos, carrots, celery and onion. If I'm in the mood for a roast beef dinner, I eat it as is. If I want stew, I just put in a little brown gravy powder to make a sauce. For soups such as chicken noodle, I do not can it with the noodles because they break down in the canning process, plus you can make a pretty good size batch of soup with one quart by not wasting space with noodles in the jar. I put a quart of soup in the kettle, add one quart of water and a couple bullion cubes, and bring it to a simmer and add about 1 1/2-2 cups of dry noodles. Simmer until the noodles are tender.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah I am starting to figure out it isnt roket science!! I hope i can get my harvest in before I have to go overseas! So I can can it all up for the wife for winter!!
 

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Didn't your canner come with an instruction book? Mine did, though it's been lo these many years ago.

Generally, high-acid foods and high-sugar foods (tomatoes, berries, and fruits) do not need to be pressure-canned. All other veggies, and all meats, must be pressure canned. You need to know your elivation; you can get this info online if you don't already know it.

I live at less than 1000 feet; so I know from experience that meat is processed at 10-lb pressure for 70 to 90 minutes, depending on size of the jar.

Google, and type " How to can (the food you want to can) ".

If you mix items in a given jar, you must process it for the time that the ingredient which takes longest. So if you have a tomato/ meat sauce with onions, mushrooms, bell pepper, and garlic, You would process it for 90 minutes at the weight needed for your altitude.

I prefer raw pack whenever possible, since processing at 10lb for 90 minutes might turn the item you are cooking to mush if it is already cooked.

Last spring I got 3 cases of asperagus and put it up in jars. I can't say I saved a lot of money (it cost about the same as what I would pay for cans in the store) but it tastes better, because glass jars don't give any flavors.

Lehmann Brothers has bulk lids. Once you get jars, you can reuse jars for many many times.

You will get addicted to canning!
 

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But don't be afraid to can plain meat. "A pound is a pint" -- I got a good buy on some boneless, skinless chicken thigh filets this week, canned seven pints. When I get ready for chicken and rice, chicken and noodles, chicken and dumplings, I'm all set. That much chicken is >12 meals for me.

PS Doc2000, all those exclamation points make a person dizzy!!!
 

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Ghost
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As far as measurements I dont measure anything so add as much as you like to taste.
Chili- ground beef or deer, diced onions, diced bell pepper, dark red kidney beans, pinto beans stewed tomatoes, a couple teaspoons of chili powder, a lil minced garlic or garlic powder, salt and pepper. dont drain grease from meat, it gets hotter spicy wise the longer it cooks, and the best chili i ever ate was made from leftover pinto beans cooked in a crock pot the day before.

Vegetable beef soup
chunks of stew beef sauteed in garlic onions and salt and pepper
a bag of frozen veggies, soup mix
diced potatoes
butter
salt and pepper
stewed tomatoes

grandmas chili
ground beef
diced onions
light red kidney beans
stewed tomatoes
butter
salt and pepper
tablespoon +/- of chili powder

jambalaya
box zatarans jambalaya rice mix
smoked sausage
diced onions and bell peppers
diced or stewed tomatoes
kidney beans
cook according to directions with all xtras added, may need to cook a lil longer

hope these help!
 
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